Oral-History:List of all Oral Histories

From ETHW

The Engineering and Technology History Wiki aims to build the premier oral history collection of engineers and technologists in the world. An "oral history" differs from an "interview" in that interview is a finished product that you might see in the newspaper, on TV, or in some other medium. It is meant to convey particular information.

An oral history, on the other hand, is considered by historians to be a "primary source," raw data from which they will, in combination with other primary and secondary sources, create historical narratives. Although a historian might also use a magazine interview or a videotaped speech as a primary source, an oral history is a document created by themselves or another historian through the informal recording of a dialogue between interviewer and interviewee. Although edited by the interviewer to conform with the IEEE Social Media Operations and Best Practices Guide, flow, style and consistency, and by the interviewee to confirm that his or her words have been appropriately captured, an oral history transcript is relatively unedited when compared to other forms of interview.

The ETHW is determined to preserve as source material for the future historians of technology the personal memories of pioneers in the electrical, electronics, and computer fields, the technologists who transformed the world in the 20th and 21st centuries. We also preserve the personal memories of those who have played major roles in the various engineering associations.

The ETHW oral history collection is made up of oral histories conducted and owned by the ETHW partner societies, which include: AIAA, AIChE, AIME, ASHRAE, ASCE, ASME, IEEE, SPE and SWE. The conducting society of the oral history is noted at the end of the description in the abstract.

The following oral histories represent the views of the interviewee and they do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the ETHW partner societies. Interviews should be viewed as a part of the historical record and as a window into the environment many of our members and colleagues have faced during their careers.

For more information on IEEE's Code of Ethics and Code of Conduct please visit the IEEE Code of Ethics

Oral History Collections

The oral histories on the ETHW can be broken down into several collections:

Group Oral Histories

The following oral histories feature interview subjects with multiple participants:

  • Bailey, James J., and Dunn, Rosalie - surveys developments and people in electrocardiography from the 1950s to about 1980. Dunn's role is as a statistician and Bailey evaluates the results of tests. (IEEE)
  • Beverage, Harold H., and Peterson, Harold O. - Harold Beverage, known for his pioneering research in early radio, was the former director of radio research for RCA Laboratories, Dr. Peterson was formerly in charge of the Reception Laboratory at Riverhead. (IEEE)
  • Bierman, Elizabeth, and Pedersen, Allison - Elizabeth Bierman is FY15 SWE President, a senior product support manager at Honeywell Aerospace, Allison Pedersen is a Engineering Manager within the Air Data Systems Center of Excellence at United Technologies (UTC) Aerospace Systems (formerly Goodrich Aerospace). (SWE)
  • Brody, Bernice and Jeff - Bernice, SWE Fellow, retired from IBM in 2016 as an Infrastructure Delivery Project Executive at IBM, where she had worked since 1979, Jeff was instrumental in the founding of the SWE Mid-Hudson Section. (SWE)
  • Byford, Mick; Williams, Robert; and Winton, Bob - In the interview, the three discuss the motivation for founding the UKRI Section as an alternative to an IEE dominated by "heavy" electrical engineers; the sometimes tense, but generally amicable relation with the IEE and other national societies; the differences between the transnational IEEE and IEE; the working relationship between section volunteers and IEEE staff; the founding of Region 8; political, cultural and linguistic issues within Region 8; and the governance, finances and services of Region 8. (IEEE)
  • Clarke, Yvonne, and Sharpe, Irene - Yvonne Clark, SWE Fellow, began her career working at Frankford Arsenal-Gage Laboratories and at RCA. She became the first female faculty member in the College of Engineering and Technology at Tennessee State University and has taught at TSU for over 50 years, where she has served twice as department chair and eventually became an associate professor. Irene Sharpe, SWE Fellow, worked on automotive electrical systems at Ford Motor Company and later at General Motors Corporation. She joined United Technologies in 1988 and remained there as a principle engineer until her retirement in 1999. (SWE)
  • Davies, Donald, and Barber, Derek - Donald Davies was a Welsh computer scientist who was a co-inventor of packet switching (and originator of the term), Derek L.A. Barber was a deputy at NPL before becoming chair of the European Information Network and eventually moving to Logica, in the private sector. (IEEE)
  • Fowler, Kathryn, and Fowler, Charles - at the MIT Rad Lab, Charles worked on the Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) system and Kathryn assisted mathematicians on the Marchand mechanical calculating machines. (IEEE)
  • French, Isabelle, and Pitts, Elaine - Dr. Isabelle French, SWE Fellow, joined Bell Telephone Laboratories in 1954 in Allentown, Pennsylvania, where she remained until her retirement more than 40 years later. Elaine Pitts, SWE Fellow, worked at the Sperry and Hutchinson Company, where she organized and installed its packaging department. She was appointed the Vice President of Corporate Relations in 1970, and nine years later moved to California to open the Dalton/Pitts Associates packaging company. (SWE)
  • Gaylard, Phyllis, and Strong, Pamela - Pamela Strong is a rocket scientist and the recipient of the 2007 SWE Achievement Award. Phyllis Gaylard is a retired aerospace engineer. Strong and Gaylard are friends and SWE Fellows. (SWE)
  • Goldey, James; Hittinger, William; and Tanenbaum, Morris - the panel members discuss the events leading up to the development of the silicon diffused-base transistor. They touch on the disadvantages of germanium, the difficulty of purifying silicon, and the influence of other researchers. In the second session, they focus on devices, in particular the PNPN diode and its development by Shockley, as well as the hybrid integrated circuit and its ultimate displacement by CMOS technology. (IEEE)
  • Kazato, Kenji and Ito, Kazuo - Founders of JEOL, which specializes in the design and manufacture of electron microscopes. (IEEE)
  • Kellerman, Richard, and Kocher, Alix - Richard Kellerman and Alix Kocher are co-founder and current CEO, respectively, of Nielsen Kellerman (NK), a company that produces sports performance monitors and weather instruments. The company was started in 1978 by Kellerman and Paul Nielsen – co-workers at Xerox Corporation – after Rowing Coach Ted Nash from the University of Pennsylvania brought broken pieces of rowing equipment to them, leading Kellerman and Nielsen to devise their own products for the sport of competitive rowing, eventually creating the CoxBox. The company has expanded to manufacture not only rowing equipment, but other sports products as well as weather instruments used in various circumstances such as firefighting. (IEEE)
  • Lucietto, Anne, and Peters, Diane - Anne Lucietto and Diane Peters are mechanical engineers. They have both served as president of the Chicago Regional Section of the Society of Women Engineers and Lucietto continues to chair committees at the national level. (SWE)
  • Rajchman, Jan, and Hoagland, Albert S. - Dr. Jan Rajchman's pioneering career in electronics contributed enormously to computer technology and data processing, Dr. Albert Hoagland has contributed a great deal to computer data recording. (IEEE)
  • Rhee, Tae-Won, and Kim, Duck-Jin - At the Korea University Rhee directed the University's computing center and its Research Institute for Information and Communication Technology (RIICT). In 1988, he served as president of KITE, the Korean Institute of Telematics and Electronics. Kim worked as a research engineer for the Atomic Energy Research Institute, and he worked on the restructuring of the Korean Institute of Electronic Engineers, the predecessor of KITE. In 1985 Kim served as president of this organization, which would later become IEEK, the Institute of the Electronics Engineers of Korea. (IEEE)
  • Van Deerlin, Lionel, and Jackson, Charles - Democratic Representative Lionel Van Deerlin of California and his aide, electrical engineer Charles Jackson, helped create the proposed Communications Act of 1980. This bill was a Congressional attempt to alter the regulation guidelines set forth in the 1934 Communications Act. The new bill addresses nearly fifty years of change in the telecommunications industry, including the advent of computers, lasers, and fiber optics. (IEEE)
  • Weisman, Renee; Brody, Bernice; and Inden, Marjorie - Renee Weisman retired from IBM in 2007 as a distinguished engineer and director of engineering after spending nearly thirty years with the company. Marge Inden is a senior registered associate with Morgan Stanley. Bernice Brody retired from IBM in 2016 as an Infrastructure Delivery Project Executive at IBM, where she had worked since 1979. (SWE)

Individual Oral Histories

The following oral histories feature interview subjects with single participants:

A

  • Aatre, Vasudev K. - IEEE Fellow in 2002 “for leadership in research and development for strategic electronics and defense systems.”, director of the Defense Research and Development Organization and science advisor to the defense minister (IEEE)
  • Abajian, Henry B. - worked at MIT Rad Lab in the 1940s and provided systems support and training for the SCR-584 (IEEE)
  • Acero, Alex - IEEE Fellow, President of IEEE Signal Processing Society (2014-2015), member of the Board of Directors of the IEEE Foundation. Leads the speech team in Siri, Apple’s personal assistant for iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, Apple TV, and Carplay; and he is an Affiliate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering at the University of Washington. (IEEE)
  • Adcock, Willis - involved with Texas Instrument’s development of the portable, transistor radio for Regency Radio, their supply of transistors to IBM, and their supply of transistors to the military as compact electronics for their Atlas and Minuteman missiles (IEEE)
  • Adler, Michael - 2003 IEEE President, worked for GE, including the Insulated Gate Bipolor Transistor (IGBT), high voltage power MOSFET’s, and the High Voltage Integrated Circuit (HVIC) (IEEE)
  • Adler, Norbert - worked in the patents department of Siemens, from 1960 to 1985 he managed consumer appliances for the living room (IEEE)
  • Aguilera, Roberto - Distinguished Author of the Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology and AAPG co-instructor on fracture reservoir analysis from 1984 to 1996 (AIME)
  • Aiken, William Ross - inventor of the thin cathode-ray tube, an early version of "flat-screen television" developed for armed forces airplanes and helicopters (IEEE)
  • Alami, Rachid - director of Robotics and A.I. research at the Laboratory for Analysis and Architecture of Systems (LAAS) of the CNRS, the French National Research Center at the University of Toulouse (IEEE)
  • Alexander, Charles - 1997 IEEE President, IEEE Life Fellow and educator at Tennessee Tech, Temple University, Cal State Northridge and Cleveland State (IEEE)
  • Allaire, Royal P. - worked at MIT Rad Lab on transforming magnetron, cathode, etc. tubes, from design to production readiness (IEEE)
  • Allan, David W. - worked for 32 years at NBS/NIST in Boulder, CO and developed the Allan variance, the Modified Allan variance and the Time variance, all three of which became international standards (IEEE)
  • Allen, Frances Fran - an expert on compilers for high-performance computing, Allen worked at IBM and published on optimization, interprocedural analysis and automatic parallelization (IEEE)
  • Altshuler, Edward - IEEE Life Fellow for "for contributions to the understanding of tropospheric effects on millimeter wave propagation", Chair of the IEEE Boston Section of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society, 1965-1966. (IEEE)
  • Ambrose, Robert - Principal Investigator of the Game Changing Development Program at the NASA Johnson Space Center, and head of NASA's Robonaut project (IEEE)
  • Amm, Kathleen - head of the Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Lab (IEEE)
  • Anderson, Brian - Professor and Head of the Department of Systems Engineering, and later as Director of the Research School of Information Sciences and Engineering at Australian National University (IEEE)
  • Anderson, Deborah - researched the Dayton code breaking project, and her father's, Joseph Desch's contributions to information technology (IEEE)
  • Anderson, W. Cleon - 2005 IEEE President, worked for Sperry, Univac, Unisys, Loral, Lockheed Martin and L3 Communications (IEEE)
  • Anderson-Rowland, Mary - SWE Fellow, Associate Professor in Arizona State University’s Industrial Engineering Department. While serving as the first female Associate Dean in the ASU Fulton School of Engineering, Anderson-Rowland developed the Women in Engineering and Minority Engineering programs to help increase the number of underrepresented minorities in ASU’s engineering programs (SWE)
  • Anderson, Wes - worked on magnetometers and on NMR spectrometers and was the Systems and Techniques Lab director at Varian (IEEE)
  • Andrei, Eva - an experimental condensed matter physicist recognized for her work on low dimensional electron systems, including two-dimensional electrons on helium, magnetically induced Wigner crystal in semiconductor heterojunctions and vortices in superconductors (IEEE)
  • Andrews, Fred - President of the IEEE Communications Society, 1986-1987. He was elected to IEEE Fellow grade in 1973 for "contributions to digital transmission and to systems, and to transmission objectives and standards." (IEEE)
  • Angwin, Bruce - graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and has worked at GE and other locations like Oakridge, Fermilab, Los Alamos, Santa Fe and Albuquerque. Angwin also served as IEEE Region 6 Director from 1964-1966 and has been involved in Wescon since its origins in the 1940s (IEEE)
  • Anthony, David - senior Information Systems manager in BHP Billiton's Petroleum division, where he serves as lead for IT Strategy. He is also responsible for IT services for Cyber Security, Compliance, Controls and Project Delivery (SPE)
  • Apelian, Diran - Alcoa-Howmet Professor of Engineering and Founding Director of the Metal Processing Institute (MPI) at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI). He is credited with pioneering work in various areas of solidification processing and powder metallurgy – specifically in molten metal processing, aluminum alloy development, plasma deposition, spray casting/forming, and semi-solid processing of metals (AIME)
  • Aplan, Frank F. - Distinguished Professor of Metallurgy and Mineral Processing at The Pennsylvania State University, a former chairman of the Minerals and Metallurgical Processing Division and Board member of SME. he was elected a Distinguished Member in 1978 (AIME)
  • Arai, Tatsuo - IEEE Life Fellow and Osaka University full professor in the Department of Systems Innovation and past Vice President of IAARC, Chair of the Robotics and Mechatronics Division of JSME, and a Director of RSJ (IEEE)
  • Arbib, Michael - Arbib's work has focused on the intersection of theoretical neuroscience and computer science, and the influence of that intersection on the field of robotics (IEEE)
  • Arkin, Ronald - IEEE Life Fellow, has spent most of his career at Georgia Tech, where he is currently Regents' Professor, Director of the Mobile Robot Laboratory, and Associate Dean for Research and Space Planning. Much of his work is in robot ethics and deception. He is also known for his corporate consulting, especially his decades-long work for SONY on the AIBO and QRIO robots (IEEE)
  • Arnold, Barbara J. - Chair of Mining Engineering and Professor of Practice in Mining Engineering at Penn State, 2018 SME President, for over 20 years, she represented several coal and mineral processing equipment companies in the US and consulted with coal companies and engineering contractors to develop flowsheets for new coal preparation plants, and plant retrofits through her company, PrepTech, Inc. (AIME)
  • Arnold, Ken - over 40 years of industry experience in facilities design and management. He has taught facilities engineering at the University of Houston, and has written two textbooks and over 50 technical articles on project management and facilities design (SPE)
  • Arscott, Lyn - retired in 2001 as the Executive Director of the International Association of Oil & Gas Producers (OGP) which represents the upstream oil and gas industry before international regulatory agencies (SPE)
  • Arzbaecher, Robert - Worked in teaching before transitioning into biomedical engineering. He worked on theoretical electrocardiography, invented the swallowable pill electrode, and founded the Arzco Medical Systems with his family (IEEE)
  • Asada, Minoru - IEEE Life Fellow, earned a Ph.D. in control engineering from Osaka University in 1982. In 1997, he became a graduate professor in the Department of Adaptive Machine Systems at Osaka University. His research focuses on “computer vision,” or pattern recognition, and the structure of motion in mobile robots, image processing, and robotic behaviors (IEEE)
  • Ash, Eric - Electrical engineer who has specialized in electron optics and ultrasonics (IEEE)
  • Aspray, William - In 1989, Aspray became director of the IEEE History Center, and during his tenure created a bigger oral history program, started Center conferences, and built an international presence for the History Center (IEEE)
  • Astrom, Karl - Aström has made many practical applications of control theory, including work with artificial intelligence, ship steering, water treatment plants, and heating and air conditioning systems. He is the recipient of the Callender Silver Medal from the Institute of Measurement and Control in London, and is an IEEE Life Fellow (IEEE)
  • Atal, Bishnu - IEEE Life Fellow and an Affiliate Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA. He retired in March 2002 after working for more than forty years at Lucent Bell Labs, and AT&T Labs. He was a Technical Director at the AT&T Shannon Laboratory, Florham Park, New Jersey, from 1997 to 2002 and the Head of the Acoustics and Audio Communication Research Department at Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ, in 1996 (IEEE)
  • Atkeson, Chris - Professor at the Robotics Institute and Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University (IEEE)
  • Auerbacher, Werner F. - taught at the Radio Television Institute where he provided both educational training for the army and technical guidance to the U.S. Government, which secured Auerbacher's U.S. citizenship so that he could contribute to the Radio Television Institute's defense projects. After World War II, Auerbacher returned to Pilot to work on FM converters and televisions, and later joined Emerson working on a variety of government projects, specifically in the field of magnetics (IEEE)
  • Aylor, James - IEEE Life Fellow and an Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, was president of the Computer Society in 1993. His research focuses on digital design and he is an innovator in the development of VHDL, the VHSIC Hardware Description Language used for describing digital hardware (IEEE)
  • Aziz, Khalid - Otto N. Miller Professor of Earth Sciences and Professor of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University. He served as professor of chemical and petroleum engineering at the University of Calgary where he established the Computer Modeling Group and managed it for 5 years (SPE)

B

  • Baal-Schem, Jacob - served as chair of the Life Members Chapter Group in Israel and served as the IEEE Israel Section Chair from 1978 to 1981 and Region 8's History Activities Coordinator. For his many contributions to IEEE, Baal-Schem received the Larry K. Wilson Transnational Award of 1987 for his involvment in initiating MELECON in 1981, and the IEEE Region 8 Volunteer Award in 2008 (IEEE)
  • Babb, Albert Les - Worked in chemical, nuclear, and biochemical engineering and made his most significant contributions applying the latter for medical advancements (IEEE)
  • Bachman, Charles - worked with torn tape systems at Dow Chemical in the 1950s, developed a manufacturing control system at General Electric in the 1960s, and on databases and distributed systems while working for Honeywell in the 1970s (IEEE)
  • Bachman, Henry - 1987 IEEE President, an IEEE Life Fellow, and an Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, is an industrial engineer and senior manager with Wheeler Laboratories. As IEEE President he oversaw the IEEE adoption of approval voting for institute elections (IEEE)
  • Bacon, Jean - IEEE Life Fellow, helped establish computer science as an academic discipline. She is currently Professor of Distributed Systems at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, Director of Studies in Computer Science at Jesus College, and heads the Opera Research Group (IEEE)
  • Bailey, Betty Lou - had a long career at General Electric, where she held positions as a testing, design, and systems engineer in GE's Large Jet Engine Department, Gas Turbine Department, and in its Valley Forge Space Technology Center, where she worked on the NASA Nimbus weather satellite project (SWE)
  • Baim, Robert - Worked in many Westinghouse positions, including as a test supervisor, positions in sales engineering and program management and as Director of Business and Technology Development. Projects he worked on included BOMARC, Minute Man Missile, Univac, F-15 radar, APQ-120, MIFASS and Comanche (IEEE)
  • Bainbridge, Kenneth T. - Performed administrative tasks at the MIT Rad Lab such as arranging housing for incoming scientists, recruiting scientists, and his main responsibility, which was heading up the modulator group (IEEE)
  • Bajcsy, Ruzena (2002) - IEEE Life Fellow, has long been a member of the ECE Department at UC-Berkeley. While her previous research centered on robotics and automation, her current focus is on artificial intelligence; biosystems and computational biology; control, intelligent systems, and robotics; graphics and human-computer interaction, computer vision; and security (IEEE)
  • Bajcsy, Ruzena (2010) (IEEE)
  • Baker, Edythe - Worked as an assistant to Dr. Lee A. Dubridge, director of the MIT Radiation Laboratory. (IEEE)
  • Bakken, Earl - Bakken constructed the world’s first self-contained pacemaker, an electronic device that provides a normal heartbeat through electronic stimulation of the heart muscle (IEEE)
  • Bala, Kavita - Dean of Cornell Ann S. Bowers College of Computing and Information Science at Cornell University. She co-founded GrokStyle, a visual recognition AI company, which drew IKEA as a client, and was acquired by Facebook in 2019 (IEEE)
  • Balde, Jack - worked at Western Electric on airborne radar, underwater sonar, and navigational systems autopilots, hearing aids, and other military subjects up to ca. 1958. From 1956 on he taught at Western Electric’s in-house graduate engineering program, where he taught radar systems designing, engineering statistics, human factors engineering, and other systems design (IEEE)
  • Bale, Christopher - devoted most of his career to the development of the FactSage system particularly in the area of software development, and to the research and development of other interactive interfaces, especially internet-based programs at Ecole Polytechnique (AIME)
  • Baliga, B. Jayant - joined General Electric Company where he invented, developed, and commercialized the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) and spearheaded commercialization of wideband semiconductor integrated circuits. IGBTs are integrated widely in consumer, industrial, lighting, transportation, medical, renewable energy, and other technologies (IEEE)
  • Bang, Jens - son of Peter Bang, was born in 1935 and graduated from the technical university in Copenhagen in 1958. After employment with General Electric in the United States, Bang returned to Denmark in 1963 and worked in product management for Bang and Olufsen (IEEE)
  • Baran, Paul - Electrical engineer who is most well-known for his role in the development of packet-switching networks (IEEE)
  • Barrette, C.E. - commanding officer of the Attachment 3, 805th Signal Service Company and was in charge of the maintenance and operation of the SIGSALY system in Algiers, North Africa during World War II (IEEE)
  • Barrow, Bruce - founding member of the IRE Benelux Section and elevated to IEEE Fellow in 1970 “for contributions to the field of standardization and to communication theory and practice.” (IEEE)
  • Barthold, Lionel - power engineer whose technical and business work at General Electric led him to found his own power studies company, Power Technologies Incorporated (PTI) (IEEE)
  • Bartik, Jean - Among the first generation of women programmers, Bartik worked on the ENIAC and UNIVAC computers (IEEE)
  • Bartlett, Thomas - after taking low-level jobs at the AIEE, he studied accounting at night school and was elevated to an accounting position. From there, he rose to the head of accounting operations at AIEE and stayed on with the IEEE after the merger of the AIEE and IRE in 1963 (IEEE)
  • Bassingthwaighte, James - The originator of the Human Physiome Project and former director at the Center for Bioengineering at the University of Washington, his research has combined physiology and biomedical engineering (IEEE)
  • Baum, Eleanor - IEEE Life Fellow, an Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, a SWE Pioneer, and an electrical engineer, received her Ph.D. from Polytechnic Institute of New York in 1964. She has played leadership roles in numerous professional associations and was awarded the SWE Upward Mobility Award in 1990. In addition, she was inducted into the Women in Technology Hall of Fame in 1996 (SWE)
  • Beck, Arnold - telecommunications engineer who was a research engineer at Hughes and STC and then taught electrical engineering at Cambridge University until his retirement. He received his degree from University College in London, and then went to work at Henry Hughes and Sons where he worked on various electronics projects and early klystron research. During World War II, he joined the naval scientific service and worked at the H.H. Wills physics lab (IEEE)
  • Bedi, Joyce - Senior Historian Emerita, at the Lemelson Center, National Museum of American History. In this oral history, Bedi discusses her education and career, especially her employment, during the 1980s, as Curator and later, Acting Directory (two years) of the IEEE History Center (at that time it was the Center for the History of Electrical Engineering). (IEEE)
  • Bekey, George - IEEE Life Fellow, spent forty years on the engineering faculty of the University of Southern California. He has played major roles in the fields of robotic prosthetics, human robot interaction, and robot ethics (IEEE)
  • Bellanger, Maurice - received his undergraduate degree in electronics engineering in 1965 from Ecole Nationale Superiéure Des Télécommunications. He joined Télécommunications, Radioélectriques and Téléphoniques [TRT], a subsidiary of Phillips Communications, in 1967 and since then has worked on digital signal processing and its applications in telecommunications (IEEE)
  • Beltrami, Ottorino - joined the Commercial Division of Olivetti in 1950 and became managing director of Olivetti General Electric in 1964 when GE bought the Computer Division. He stepped down in 1970, when GE sold the division to Honeywell, but returned to Olivetti in 1971 to oversee its transition from mechanical calculators (and similar equipment) to electronics (IEEE)
  • Benjamin, Ralph - worked for the Scientific Civil Service at the Admiralty Surface Weapons Establishment (ASWE). He moved to the Admiralty Underwater Weapons Establishment (AUWE) and was involved in developing information, intelligence, and military (torpedoes, submarines, etc.) technologies. After the seven-year's work at the AUWE, Benjamin started a new career at the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) at Cheltenham, UK. He carried out Signals Intelligence tasks and developed a speech security system and an encryption system. When he retired from the GCHQ post, Benjamin joined NATO and got an appointment to the Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers of Europe (SHAPE) Technical Center as Head of the Communications Technique branch (IEEE)
  • Bensoussan, Alain - completed his Ph.D. in Mathematics at the University of Paris in 1969. He is an IEEE Life Fellow whose research interests include control theory, applied mathematics, analysis and stochastic processes, and automatic and applied mathematics. For his contributions to the field, he has received several awards and honors, including the 2014 W. T. & Idalia Reid Prize from SIAM (IEEE)
  • Beranek, Leo (1996) - worked with Professor Hunt as his assistant at Harvard University’s Cruft Laboratory. Beranek began work on a sound control project for the U.S. National Defense Research Committee in 1940, attempting to control vibration and sound in aircraft used in the war effort. The Kamikaze pilot dilemma of World War II initiated Beranek’s second defense project, the effort to speed up marine on-board communications. Beranek, with co-founders Bolt and Newman, started Bolt, Beranek, and Newman (BBN) in 1948 (IEEE)
  • Beranek, Leo (2005) (IEEE)
  • Berman, Fran - an expert in parallel and grid computing, has spent her professional career in Academics, first at Purdue and then at the Unviersity of California at San Diego (IEEE)
  • Berners-Lee, Mary - A mathematician and computer programmer who worked in a team that developed programs for Manchester University’s series of Ferranti Mark 1 computers (IEEE)
  • Berners-Lee, Tim - Known as the inventor of the World Wide Web (IEEE)
  • Beverage, Harold H. - pioneer of radio engineering, particularly of antennas and trans-oceanic transmission. The Beverage antenna was the first wave antenna. As a GE and RCA engineer Beverage developed more than 40 patents and received several professional honors (IEEE)
  • Bey, Lois - chemical engineer who holds the distinction of being the first woman graduate in chemical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Chicago, where she graduated in 1950. She worked for a succession of companies including Ewald Laboratories and the Armour Research Institute (now IIT Research Institute) with responsibilities ranging from lab technician to assistant engineer (SWE)
  • Bhadeshia, Harry - Emeritus Tata Steel Professor of Metallurgy at the University of Cambridge. During 2022, he joined Queen Mary University of London as Professor of Metallurgy. His main interest has been on the theory of solid-state phase transformations with emphasis on the prediction and verification of microstructural development in complex metallic alloys, particularly multicomponent steels (AIME)
  • Bhappu, Roshan - worked on hundreds of mining projects concerned with the extraction of base metals, precious metals, industrial minerals, coal and uranium. Several of these projects have resulted in commercial operations. Bhappu’s special expertise is in the preconcentration of minerals using HMS concept, heap and dump leaching, in-situ extraction of copper and uranium and projects related to environmental considerations (AIME)
  • Bidard, Rene - was employed at Compagnie Électro-Mécanique in 1934, became chief engineer in the aftermath of World War II, and worked with the company until its 1983 acquisition by the Alsthom company (IEEE)
  • Biegelmeier, Gottfried - started his career in the testing laboratories of the Austrian Association of Electricity Companies and the Federal Research Institute Arsenal. From 1957 onwards he worked as a consulting engineer authorized by the state of Austria, and was in charge of the R&D department for low voltage switchgear at Felten & Guilleaume Austria (IEEE)
  • Black, Harold S. - invented the negative feedback amplifier, revolutionizing the field of electronics. Black began experimenting with telecommunications systems in his youth and received a BSS in electrical engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1921. Recruited before his graduation, Black joined the labs at Western Electric Company in July 1921. After undergoing the company’s training program, he joined the Systems Engineering Department, where his projects included carrier system design (IEEE)
  • Blasingame, Tom - Professor and the holder of the Robert L. Whiting Professorship in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University in College Station Texas (SPE)
  • Bledsoe, Woodrow Wilson - Worked on automated theorem proving and helped found the artificial intelligence firm Panoramic Research Inc. (IEEE)
  • Blicq, Ron - wrote manuals for the U.S. Air Force and the RCAF on the installation and maintenance of early warning defense systems. In 1967 Blicq was offered the position of head of the Technical Communication Department at Red River College in Winnipeg, Canada. Blicq developed the program in technical writing and presentation and published the textbook Technically-Write! during his twenty-three year tenure at Red River (IEEE)
  • Blinchikoff, Herman - Worked on electronic filters that were used in a wide range of Westinghouse projects (IEEE)
  • Bloch, Martin - designed timing on fuses, oscillators and crystal filters for guidance systems. Bloch left Bulova to found Frequency Electronics, Inc. in 1962 and as of 2020 is the Executive Chairman and Chief Scientist of Frequency Electronics, Inc. (FEI). Bloch is the recipient of the 1992 Sawyer Award of the IEEE UFFC Society (IEEE)
  • Bloembergen, Nicolaas - received the IEEE Medal of Honor in 1983, "For pioneering contributions to Quantum Electronics including the invention of the three-level maser." He shared the 1981 Nobel Prize in Physics with Arthur L. Schawlow and Kai Siegbahn for their contributions to the development of laser spectroscopy (IEEE)
  • Bobrow, Jim - a long time professor at University of California-Irvine, has spent the greater part of his career developing robots for use in patient rehabilitation (IEEE)
  • Bodnar, Richard L. - founding Director of Research & Development for SSAB Americas in August 2019, after being with the company for 14 years. actively served on the boards of several steel consortia and with technical societies, e.g., he served on the Board of Directors and was Chairman of the Mechanical Working & Steel Processing Division of the predecessor of AIST. He remains active on the AIST Metallurgy: Processing, Products, and Applications Technology; AIST Foundation Kent D. Peaslee Junior Faculty Award; and Hunt-Kelly Outstanding Paper Award Selection Committees (AIME)
  • Bolles, Bob - Bolles has long been a researcher at SRI international. His work has focused on the combined areas of robotics and computer vision (IEEE)
  • Bond, Susan - Bond’s career in computing at the Royal Radar Establishment included work on the Radar Automatic Computer and ALGOL 68 compiler (IEEE)
  • Boone, Gary - At Texas Instruments, he designed custom chips for business and industrial customers, notably the TMS-100. He had departed Texas Instruments in 1972 to develop microcontrollers at Litronix, then joined the Electronics Division of Ford Motor Company, where he assisted the transition of automobile engines toward greater digital control. In 1982, he founded MicroMethods (IEEE)
  • Bordogna, Joseph - 1998 IEEE President, Bordogna was active in the AIEE and the IRE while in graduate school at MIT. He worked on radar, semiconductors, and lasers at RCA and spent time with Applied Research at RCA in Camden, New Jersey. In 1964, Bordogna transitioned into academia and devoted his efforts to teaching, research, and professional activities and service focused on education, the National Science Foundation, and IEEE (IEEE)
  • Borg, Anita - Opening the field of computing to women, Borg founded three professional organizations for women in technology: the online community Systers, the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, and the Institute for Women and Technology (IEEE)
  • Bosch, Berthold - From 1956 to 1957, he held an AEG Foreign Scholarship at the Electronics Department of the University of Southampton. During 1958-1960, as a Research Assistant at the same department, he was engaged in work on microwave-tube noise. From 1960 to 1972, he was with AEG Telefunken in Ulm, Germany, where he occupied various posts in the Tube Works and in the Research Institute, eventually becoming Head of the Electronics Department in the latter institution (IEEE)
  • Boyd, James - began his professional career at 36 years of age as field engineer with Radiore Co. From 1929 to1941 he was on the faculty at Colorado School of Mines where he became associate professor and later, (1946-1947), dean of faculty. During World War II he served in the War Department, aiding in mobilization of the mining industry for the war and then helping direct the flow of raw materials to the military production program. He next served as the first director of the Industry Division of the Military Government in Germany. From 1947 to 1951, Boyd was director of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, and during part of that period headed the Defense Minerals Administration (AIME)
  • Boyer, Rodney R. (Rod) - titanium specialist at Boeing, since 1965, Rod Boyer has been involved in basic research, development and application of titanium alloys for airframes. His efforts have been directed toward furthering the understanding of the metallurgy of titanium, i.e., the effects of processing variations, resulting in microstructural variations, on the properties of titanium alloys (AIME)
  • Bradski, Gary - co-founder of Industrial Perception, the founder of OpenCV, one of the largest computer vision libraries in the world, and is a consulting professor with Stanford University (IEEE)
  • Brewster, George - retired manager of salary recruiting at Corning, Inc. A Fellow of the Society of Women Engineers, he joined SWE in the late 1970s because he understood the challenges women engineers faced at the time. He received the Society's Rodney Chipp Award in 1885 in recognition of his service to SWE and professional support of women engineers (SWE)
  • Brill, Jim - Brill's work in mechanistic and unified modeling of multiphase flow led him to found the Tulsa University Fluid Flow Projects in 1973. Additionally, he has served as a consultant to more than 35 international oil and gas companies in a variety of multiphase flow projects around the world and is the author of over 200 technical papers (SPE)
  • Brill, Yvonne - began her career as a mathematician at Douglas Aircraft Company, but switched careers in 1946 when she became a research analyst on rocket propellant systems for RAND Corporation. Brill held numerous positions as an engineer or manager at a variety of organizations, worked as an aerospace consultant, and served on the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel and numerous U.S. National Research Study Council Committees (SWE)
  • Briskman, Robert - IEEE Life Fellow, received his undergraduate engineering degree from Princeton University. A member of Army ROTC, he trained for the U.S. Army Signal Corps and conducted intelligence work during the Cold War. Much of his career has been devoted to satellites, radio astronomy, and military, space, and civilian communications (IEEE)
  • Brockett, Roger - founded the Harvard Robotics Laboratory in 1983 and is the the An Wang Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Harvard University. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a recipient of the 1991 the IEEE Control Systems Award, and the 2009 IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award (IEEE)
  • Brown, Patricia - graduated as the first woman chemical engineer from Southwestern Louisiana Institute and went on to earn her master's in chemistry from the University of Texas. She briefly taught chemistry at Smith College and then became a research associate at Albany Medical College, after which she worked for Ethyl Corporation in Detroit where her career as a technical information resources specialist began. Brown took a job as a technical writer at Westinghouse's Bettis Atomic Power Division in 1955 and joined Texas Instruments as an Information Services Supervisor in 1957, where she had overall responsibility for the administration of the library. She left Texas Instruments for a research career in information storage and retrieval at Battelle Memorial Institute, later accepting a position in technical information management at Baxter Laboratories. Brown remained in the field of information and research until her retirement from Stepan Company. She is an early member and Fellow of the Society of Women Engineers, and served as its national president from 1961-1963 (SWE)
  • Bruch, Herbert - member of the Board of Grundig AG in Germany. He received his PhD in Physics in 1964. He spent his career working in the R&D department at Grundig. The interview first describes Bruch’s career at Grundig. Bruch then focuses on the innerworkings of the R&D department. He describes Grundig’s relationship with their suppliers and the use of cross-license. He explains how the R&D department develops customized components (IEEE)
  • Bruel, Per - started the Brüel & Kjær instrumentation company with Viggo Kjær, a colleague from the University of Copenhagen (IEEE)
  • Bruyninckx, Herman - spent most of his career at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, where he has studied problems such as the integration of vision and force control (IEEE)
  • Bubenko, Janis - took industrial employment with Riga Electrical Utility while continuing at the Latvia University as a lecturer. Working at the Riga Electrical Utility through 1944, Bubenko planned the power distribution system. He fled to Sweden in 1944 where he worked on lighting and electrical power installation and on laboratory design for four years before spending six months working in South Africa in 1949. Returning to Sweden, Bubenko worked at Chalmers University and received a licentiate degree in distribution planning (IEEE)
  • Buckley, Merrill - 1992 IEEE President, Buckley spent his career as an engineer and manager at RCA. While 1984 IEEE Vice President for Regional Activities, he planned the centennial convocation that became the model for IEEE Section Congresses. As IEEE President, he directed much of his attention to improving professional activities for the working engineer (IEEE)
  • Bullock, Richard L. - retired Mining Engineer consultant who served as a Senior Associate with Behre Dolbear & Co., Inc., while teaching three on-line courses per year for the University of Missouri-Rolla, as Professor Emeritus in Mining Engineering. Before that, as the first Endowed Quenon Chair, he taught three to five courses per semester for six and a half years. He has 47 years of experience in the mining industry in management: mineral property feasibility evaluations, mine developments and projects, ongoing mining operations, mining research, and multi-disciplined engineering design groups (AIME)
  • Burden, Richard - independent communications engineer best known for his work in FM and TV stereo systems. After graduating from RCA Institutes in 1952 he taught radar at Fort Monmouth as a civilian and as a corporal, and then served for a year with Armed Forces Radio in New York. After his military service, he worked at General Precision Laboratory until 1960, when he resigned and began work as an independent engineer, working primarily on a variety broadcast systems applications. He has served on a wide variety of radio-related standards committees (IEEE)
  • Burdick, Joel - long time faculty member at Cal Tech, has focused his work in several areas, including medical applications, especially for the treatment of paralytics, and space exploration work for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (IEEE)
  • Burks, Arthur - Worked on the design of ENIAC and later chaired and helped found the Department of Computer and Communication Sciences at University of Michigan (IEEE)
  • Burrus, C. Sidney - decided to go into digital signal processing with Tom Parks and started the first course in Digital Signal Processing in 1968 at Rice University; they looked at filters and algorithms in DSP (IEEE)
  • Bussgang, Julian - IEEE Life Fellow, worked at MIT Lincoln Laboratory (1951-1955) and at RCA Aerospace Division (1955-1962) where he first served as Manager of Radar Development and later as Manager of Applied Research. Leaving RCA in 1962, he founded Signatron, Inc., an electronics company, and served as its president (1962-1985) (IEEE)
  • Butler, Joe - built his career as an EMC engineer, at RCA Aerospace, Raetheon, and Chomerics, working mainly on military projects. He was president of the IEEE EMC society in 2000-2001. (IEEE)

C

  • Cahalan, Joe - As a child, his family lived in the basement of the Brokaw Mansion, then IRE headquarters, who managing the day-to-day work of maintaining the building. He retired as Vice President of Communications and Social Responsibility and President of the Xerox Foundation (IEEE)
  • Cain, James Thomas, 1995 IEEE President, Cain received his education and spent his career in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the University of Pittsburgh. As IEEE President, he led IEEE further into electronic publishing through IEEE publishing its own CD-ROMs of its Journals (IEEE)
  • Campbell, Archie - During his forty-year career at the University of Cambridge, Campbell pioneered the so-called "Campbell technique" for investigating the penetration of flux in bulk superconductors and, together with late Professor Jan Evetts, authored in 1972 the subject-defining monograph “Flux pinning in Type II superconductors” (Adv. Phys. 21, 199, 1972). (IEEE)
  • Campbell, Betty - worked as a computer programmer at MIT’s Radiation Laboratory. She participated in research projects with the Theory Group, Joint Computing Group, and Nuclear Science Lab, and helped to develop the 704 and Whirlwind computers (IEEE)
  • Candlin, Rosemary - the director of studies in the Computer Science department at the University of Edinburgh, Candlin helped establish computing as an academic discipline. After teaching, she went on to work for the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva (IEEE)
  • Caplan, Norm - spent most of his career at the U. S. National Science Foundation, where he administered programs that funded a wide range of robotics projects. He was also one of the founders and later served as president of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (IEEE)
  • Carassa, Francesco - joined Magneti Marelli, the leading Italian radio communications company. At Magneti Marelli, Carassa played significant roles in radio relay development and experimentation, and he directed the company's research laboratory. After fifteen years of employment at Magneti Marelli, Carassa became Chair for Radios and Relays at Polytechnic of Milano in 1962 (IEEE)
  • Cardullo, Mario - Registered Professional Engineer and an American inventor with multiple patents, most notably for the modern RFID in 1969 (patented in 1970 and issued in Jan 1973). He received a BME and an MME from NYU-Poly, an MEA degree from George Washington University, and a Ph.D. in IT from George Mason University. Dr. Cardullo has served as a professor and written multiple textbooks, and has been instrumental in establishing several businesses (IEEE)
  • Carlisle, Brian - long been a leader in the development and sale of robots for industrial applications, co-founding and leading several companies, including Vicarm, Adept Technologies, and Precise Automation (IEEE)
  • Carter, Emily - Between 1988 to 2004, Carter was employed by the University of California, Los Angeles, where she held professorships in Chemistry and Materials Science. Carter is the Dean of the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science and the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, and a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University (IEEE)
  • Casals, Alicia - professor at Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya and has done work on robotics object recognition (IEEE)
  • Casazza, Jack - power engineer best known for his management of gas and electric systems at Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE&G) in New Jersey (IEEE)
  • Cascadden, Sharon - completed her engineering degree in 1980 while working at Hughes Missile Systems. She retired in 1999 from Hughes Space and Communications. She was a Fellow of the Society of Women Engineers and recipient of its Distinguished Service Award (SWE)
  • Cerf, Vinton - Marconi Fellow, an IEEE Life Fellow, and an Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, played a significant role in the setup of ARPANET and developed the Transmission Controlled Protocol (TCP) with Bob Kahn (IEEE)
  • Chadwick, John - worked for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), where he spent his entire 40+ year career with them. He spent two years in the engineer training program, five years as a field test engineer in Bowling Green, KY, was area supervisor at Bowling Green till 1960, then transferred out of the field and to an office job in the Electrical Engineering and Design Branch in Chattanooga (IEEE)
  • Chaffee, Milton - Worked on power supply for Microwave Early Warnings (MEW) at the MIT Rad Lab (IEEE)
  • Chance, Britton - Head of the Precision Instruments Group at the MIT Rad Lab and member of the steering committee. He was also a sailing Olympic gold medalist (IEEE)
  • Chang, Carl - IEEE Fellow, Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Iowa State University. He received a PhD in computer science from Northwestern University in 1982, and worked for GTE Automatic Electric and Bell Laboratories before joining the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1984. He joined Iowa State University in 2002, and served three terms as department chair. He has also served as President of the IEEE Computer Society in 2004 (IEEE)
  • Chapuis, Robert - attended the Ecole Polytechnique for his post-secondary education. During World War Two he helped train French army men in artillery firing, and was an officer in the Colonial Army. He returned to the Polytechnique in 1941 and entered the telecommunications field. In 1944 Chapuis worked with the French Long Lines under the Occupation. After the war he worked for the CCIF, the international telephone company, and so moved to Geneva, Switzerland. Chapuis focused on signaling and remained with the group throughout its transformation into the CCITT. He travelled internationally, helping negotiate standards for international telephone service, and writing policy papers for CCITT decisions. Chapuis helped design international switching systems during the 1960s. He retired in 1984 and helped create a 500,000 line switching system in Saudi Arabia, as well as writing and publishing papers (IEEE)
  • Chatila, Raja - spent most of his career with CNRS in Paris. His research encompasses a broad range of topics, especially creating an understanding of the interactions and applications of autonomous and cognitive robotics (IEEE)
  • Chato, John C. - Professor of Mechanical, Biological, and Nuclear Engineering for over 30 years at the University of Illinois. His primary focus was on heat transfer research (IEEE)
  • Chen, Li-Chyong - Research Fellow in the Center for Condensed Matter Sciences (CCMS) at National Taiwan University (NTU). In 1981, she received her B.S. in Physics from NTU, and in 1989 was awared a Ph. D. in Applied Physics from Harvard University. She then joined the Material Research Center at General Electric Corporate Research and Development and returned to Taiwan in 1994 as an Associate Research Fellow and was promoted to her current position in 2000. She is now leading the Advanced Materials Laboratory in the CCMS at NTU (IEEE)
  • Chenevert, Martin - devoted his career to researching the petrophysical properties of shales, wellbore stability in shale formations, the dynamic filtration of drilling muds, and properties of synthetic muds. Chenevert has also developed software applications for use in petroleum engineering and holds nine US patents, including several for drilling with low water content in oil emulsion fluids; a method for determining clay reactivity; water-based well fluids for shale stability; and treating subsurface water-sensitive shale formations (SPE)
  • Chien, Shu - Originally in physiology, he transitioned to biophysics. His many accomplishments include being the founding chair of the Department of Biological Engineering at UCSD and president of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (IEEE)
  • Chodorow, Marvin - a physicist who worked with microwaves, Klystrons, and particle accelerators. He also served as the head of Stanford's Department of Applied Physics. (IEEE)
  • Choset, Howie - robotics professor at Carnegie Mellon University since 1996. His research focuses on flexible snake robots, especially their application to medical robotics such as minimally invasive surgery (IEEE)
  • Chung-Graham, Fan - After working as a research manager at Bell Labs, Chung-Graham accepted teaching positions at the University of Pennsylvania and UC San Diego, where she is currently a professor (IEEE)
  • Cioffi, John - Considered by many in the field as the “father of DSL” (IEEE)
  • Clade, Jacques - joined Électricité de France in 1956. His early work focused on the practical problems of rapidly expanding the capacity of France's electrical transmission system in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He also worked on the project of linking French and British power systems via a cross channel cable. He was appointed technical director for transmission equipment in 1970 and assistant director of EDF international in 1983 (IEEE)
  • Clapp, Judy - began her long career as programmer on the MIT Whirlwind Computer Project, and then spent most of her career with the MITRE corporation on a series of computer projects for the U.S. Government (IEEE)
  • Clark, Yvonne Young - the first woman at Howard University to complete her B.S.E.M., graduating in 1951. She became a licensed professional engineer and was the first woman to receive a master's degree in engineering management from Vanderbilt University. Clark began her career working at Frankford Arsenal-Gage Laboratories and at RCA. She became the first female faculty member in the College of Engineering and Technology at Tennessee State University and has taught at TSU for over 50 years, where she has served twice as department chair and eventually became an associate professor (SWE)
  • Clarke, John - After a postdoctoral fellowship at UC Berkeley (1968-1969), he joined the Physics faculty, and he has been a member of the Physics Department since 1969. He received the Distinguished Teaching Award in 1983 and he was the UC Berkeley Faculty Research Lecturer in 2005. Clarke’s research fields are condensed matter physical and materials science. His principal area of research is the development, noise limitations, and applications of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). (IEEE)
  • Coales, John - joined the Admiralty Scientific Civil Service, which led him by chance to electronics and radar R&D for the Royal Navy. Coales’s contributions to the radar project, digital computer development, and control engineering, characterized his long career with the Admiralty Scientific Service, the Elliots’ Boreham Wood laboratory, and finally his academic work and research at Cambridge University (IEEE)
  • Cohen, Maxine - IEEE Senior Member and IEEE Life Member, her primary teaching focus at Nova Southern University has been Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), but she has taught other graduate courses. Cohen views HCI broadly, and her doctoral students have worked on various HCI-related issues, including website design, medical devices and telemedicine, virtual worlds, technology and seniors, privacy enhancing technologies and privacy policy legislation, gender issues, security issues, and trust in e-commerce applications (IEEE)
  • Colton, Clark - Inspired by Ed Merrill, his research focused on biomedical applications of chemical engineering. His thesis was hemodialysis (within the field of mass transfer), involving diffusion in blood, diffusion through dialysis membranes, convective transport, and analysis of performance, and later became a professor at MIT (IEEE)
  • Concordia, Charles - In 1926 Concordia joined the General Electric Company, where he worked on early television research and continued his engineering education by taking classes at Union College. Five years later he joined GE's test program, an advanced engineering course. Concordia began focusing on systems engineering and electric utility work, and became GE's consultant to public utilities, advising on system protection and reliability. During World War Two Concordia worked on generators and turbines for naval destroyer propulsion, researched superchargers for airplanes, and helped develop ships' electrical drives (IEEE)
  • Conger, Harry M., III - Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Homestake Mining Company, joined the company in 1975 as Vice President and General Manager of its Base Metals Division. He was elected President and member of the Board in 1977 and Chief Executive Officer in 1978. In 1982 he was elected Chairman of the Board and held all three posts until 1986. Mr. Conger also serves on the Boards of numerous other companies (AIME)
  • Conner, David A. - taught at four universities and served as the founding chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, IEEE Region 3 direcctor from 1992-93 and held many offices in IEEE, including Institute treasurer (IEEE)
  • Constantinides, Anthony - taught at Imperial College, and made his career in the field of digital filter design, organizing the Digital Filtering Symposium (biennial from 1967), European associations (European Association for Signal Processing) and journals in digital filtering (ca. 1970), seminars, teaching graduate students, and doing research of his own (lately modeling signals which are non-stationary, non-Gaussian, non-linear operations) (IEEE)
  • Cooley, James W. - developed the FFT through mathematical theory and applications, and has helped make it more widely available by devising algorithms for scientific and engineering applications. Cooley was a member of IEEE's Digital Signal Processing Committee from 1965 to 1979, and helped plan the Arden House conferences on digital signal processing (IEEE)
  • Coombs, Mary - As a programmer at J. Lyons & Co., Coombs worked on LEO, the first computer used for commercial business applications (IEEE)
  • Cooper, Betty - While at J. Lyons & Co., Cooper worked as a programmer on LEO I and LEO II, among the earliest computers used for commercial business applications, and wrote the Braille program for both projects (IEEE)
  • Cooper, Lois - became the first African-American woman to work for the California Department of Transportation (CALTRANS) in 1953. Cooper began at CALTRANS as an engineering aide and progressed in her career to become a Transportation Engineer and Project Manager for major transportation projects as well as heading the Public Information and Civil Rights departments in the 1970s. She became a student member of the Society of Women Engineers in 1978 and was elected to the SWE College of Fellows in 1990. Cooper became the first woman president of the Los Angeles Council of Black Professional Engineers in 1971. In her retirement, she worked with the Council to engage African-Americans to pursue engineering and continued to offer math and science tutoring on the weekends (SWE)
  • Cooper, Warren - worked at Airborne Instruments Laboratory, 1948-54, Maryland Electronics, 1954-58 (adapting Identification Friend or Foe radar antennas for civil aviation identification), and Westinghouse, 1958-86. At Westinghouse he invented a system to screen out radar echo off of water at shore-side airports, Boost-phase Antiballistic Missile System (BAMBI) (an unsuccessful system), work on countermeasures, receiver protectors, airborne and satellite radar, and Terminal Imaging Radar (IEEE)
  • Coppersmith, Susan - Specializing in theoretical condensed matter physics, Coppersmith has worked at Bell Labs, was a Professor of physics at the University of Chicago (IEEE)
  • Corke, Peter - spent twenty-five years at the Australian Government research agency CSIRO, where much of his work focused on the applications of robotics in mining and vision based robot control, also known as video servoing. Since 2010, he has been on the faculty of Queensland University of Technology (IEEE)
  • Corry, Andrew - took a job with the Boston Edison Company in 1947. Corry's work with Boston Edison included both technical work on such things as underground cables and atomic power, but also professional duties as a member of CIGRE, IEEE, and the Electric Research Council (IEEE)
  • Cory, William E. - IEEE Life Fellow, introduced to the field of EMC through his work in defense. He worked as an engineer for the U.S. Air Force, Lockheed, and the Southwest Research Institute (IEEE)
  • Cowell, Wayne - Mathematician who worked on software packages for solving specific classes of equations (IEEE)
  • Cox, Donald - spent three years as a Communications Research and Development Officer at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, working on the X-20 Dynasoar, then went to Stanford University for his PhD (1967). He worked at Bell Labs from 1967 to the AT&T divestiture in 1983, to Bellcore until 1993, managing radio research activity, and then to Stanford as a Professor of Electrical Engineering (IEEE)
  • Craig, John - worked with several different robotics groups and companies, including JPL, Adept, Invenios, and his own company, Silma, researching the motion and control of robots and robotic parts (IEEE)
  • Cross, L. Eric - earned his B.S. (1948) and Ph.D. (1952) in Physics at the Unversity of Leeds, where he began his lifelong research on ferroelectrics. In 1961,he joined the Electrical Engineering Department at Penn State University, where he had been ever since. At Penn State, he helped found the Materials Research Laboratory and mentored over fifty doctoral students. In addition to his breakthroughs and publications in the field of ferroelectricity, Cross has been involved in numerous international research efforts and even consulted on the Hubble Telescope (IEEE)
  • Cunha, JC - Cunha’s career spans engineering, teaching, and management positions in South and North America, Africa, and the Caribbean. Prior positions include manager of the Center of Offshore Excellence for Ecopetrol America in Houston, Texas, drilling manager for Petrobras International, well operations manager for Petrobras America in Houston, and associate professor of petroleum engineering at the University of Alberta, Canada (SPE)
  • Curry, David - Baker Hughes Technology Fellow working in the Technology Portfolio Management group. In addition to working on rock property estimation and drilling performance prediction, he is also active on the Baker Hughes materials committee. He is actively involved in developing technology strategy and working with clients and key vendors on technical issues. Prior to his current appointment, he was senior technical advisor and director of research for the Baker Hughes Drill Bit Systems product line (SPE)
  • Cutler, C. Chapin - communications engineer known for his development of and work on the corrugated waveguide, the traveling wave tube, and differential PCM. After receiving a B.S. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1937, Cutler was hired at Bell Labs; although he took courses at Stevens Tech and Princeton, he never fulfilled the requirements for a formal postgraduate degree. During World War II he worked on radar and the development of a proximity fuse; after the war he began work on the traveling wave tube and eventually, after his invention of differential PCM, worked on picture-phone and satellite technology (IEEE)

D

  • Dadda, Luigi - IEEE Life Fellow, conducted research in models and analog computers, and in 1953 he received an NSF grant to study at Cal Tech (IEEE)
  • Daniel, Ron - long time faculty member at Oxford, centered his career on remote control robots, such as those used in nuclear power plants (IEEE)
  • Daniels, Stella Lawrence - SWE Fellow, began teaching electrical circuits at Pratt Institute and physics at the City College of New York during her post-war tenure at Bell Telephone Laboratories. Daniels made the full-time switch to academia a couple of years later, becoming an assistant professor in electrical engineering technology at Bronx Community College, from which she retired as full professor in 1988 (SWE)
  • Dario, Paolo - IEEE Life Fellow, is a leader in the application of robotics to medicine and rehabilitation (IEEE)
  • Davenport, Lee - Worked on anti-aircraft radar at the MIT Rad Lab, serving as a project manager for the SCR-584 also involved in getting equipment to the field quickly and training troops how to use it (IEEE)
  • Davis, Martin - Known for his work on Hilbert's Tenth Problem and for his model of Post-Turing machines (IEEE)
  • Decker, Raymond - Chief Technology Officer of Thixomat/nanoMAG, LLC and Adjunct Professor of Materials Science and Engineering of The University of Michigan. He also is a member of the Board of Managers of QuesTec Innovations, LLC. and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1980 (AIME)
  • de Laet, Edward - worked as a draftsman and technician for Joe Desch at N.C.R. 1940-1945, 1946-1950 (IEEE)
  • DelVecchio, Stacey (2008) - After receiving a chemical engineering degree from the University of Cincinnati, DelVecchio joined Caterpillar in 1989 and has served as a manager since the early 2000s. An active member of the Society of Women Engineers, she served as the Society's national president from 2013-2014. (SWE)
  • DelVecchio, Stacey (2010) (SWE)
  • de Marca, J. Roberto B. - 2014 IEEE President, IEEE Life Fellow for "for leadership and contributions to international communications", Associate Academic Vice President for Sponsored Research at the Pontifical Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro (IEEE)
  • Dempsey, Stanley - geologist, lawyer, executive, and entrepreneur whose interest in the environment and outdoor pastimes led him to spearhead collaborations between the mining industry and activists, which anticipated the environmental legislation of the 1970s. Dempsey was at the forefront of developing the mining industry’s legal and policy responses to environmental regulation during this early period, and became Director of Environmental Affairs for AMAX, Inc., the first position of its kind in the industry (AIME)
  • Denert, Ernst - co-authored one of the earliest computer programming texts, Data Structures (Datenstrukturen, published 1977). Denert started work as a developer for German software company Softlab in 1976, becoming a project manager there before co-founding his own company, SD&M (Software Design and Management), with Ulfried Maiborn in 1982 (IEEE)
  • Denton, Charles - Worked on many important Westinghouse projects, including UK2 satellite, ECM programs, physical countermeasures pod, ALQ-131 and A-10 CFF – and held managerial positions such as engineering supervisor, program engineering manager, program manager and investment manager for commercial systems (IEEE)
  • Devaney, Marjorie ("Marge") - Among the first generation of computer programmers, Devaney spent her career at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where she worked on the Mathematical Analyzer, Numerical Integrator, and Computer (MANIAC) Program (IEEE)
  • Dickmanns, Ernst - spent most of his career at the Universität der Bundeswehr München, where he worked on Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, specifically on dynamic computer vision and on autonomous vehicles (IEEE)
  • Dillmann, Rüdiger - Professor of the Department of Computer Science and is Director of the Research Lab Humanoids and Intelligence Systems at University of Karlsruhe (IEEE)
  • Doi, Miwako - IEEE Fellow, electrical engineer who received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degrees from the University of Tokyo. Her research has involved user interfaces, robotics, and document processing. She has held leadership positions at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology and Tohoku University; and been a professor at Osaka University. Much of her early career she worked with increasing responsibilities at Toshiba (IEEE)
  • Dollimore, Jean - Dollimore began her research career at University College, followed by the Institute of Computing Science, where she taught courses on FORTRAN. She moved to Queen Mary College where she worked on the COSMOS project and specialized in distributed systems, co-authoring the influential book Distributed Systems: Concepts and Design (IEEE)
  • Doolittle, Howard - His most important work at the MIT Rad Lab was on the 584 microwave radar and on developing pulse transformers and pulse networks (IEEE)
  • Doring, Herbert - communications engineer best known for his work in electron tubes. He received his diploma in electrical engineering from the Technische Hochschule Vienna in 1934, and received his Doctor Techn. in electrical engineering from the same university in 1936. He worked at Siemens in Vienna and then at the AEG Institute, moving to C. Lorenz AG in 1941 as Oscar Heil's successor. He became a professor at Aachen in 1952 and founded the Institute of High Frequency Technique there in 1957 (IEEE)
  • Douglas, Joseph - the first African American professor of engineering at Penn State University. Later he served as associate dean of Penn State’s Commonwealth campuses. Douglas received multiple awards from from Penn State and the Pennsylvania State Board of Higher Education for the excellence of his teaching. Douglas' IEEE service includes work as chapter chairman and as Region 2 Director (1985-1986) (IEEE)
  • Doyle, Fiona M. - Doyle joined the faculty at U.C. Berkeley in 1983 and was appointed to the Donald H. McLaughlin Chair in Mineral Engineering in 1998. She served as Chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering from 2002 to 2005 and Executive Associate Dean of the College of Engineering at Berkeley from 2005 to 2009, from 2011 to 2014, and in 2022. (AIME)
  • Drabek, Rudolf - During his career at Philips, Rudolf Drabek worked on the influential recording and video technologies of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This interview details the development of radio and video recording technology, compact cassettes, and Video 2000. From an international perspective, Drabek analyzes the technological and economic influences on the development of video recording and VHS technologies. (IEEE)
  • Dresselhaus, Mildred - graduated from Hunter College and continued her education at Cambridge University under a Fulbright scholarship. Dresselhaus then returned to the US to finish her postgraduate degree at Radcliffe College and the University of Chicago. Her research on carbon-based materials has been instrumental to the development of solid state electronics (IEEE)
  • Drozd, Andrew - IEEE Life Fellow, has spent most of his career as head of his own EMC firm, ANDRO Computational Solutions. He is an IEEE Fellow, cited for his the development of knowledge-based codes for modeling and simulation of complex systems for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). He was president of the IEEE EMC Society in 2006-2007 (IEEE)
  • Duff, William G. - conducted research on EMC through contracts with the Air Force. He has published widely on the topic, including six manuscripts. A former president of the EMC Society, he was inducted into the IEEE EMC Hall of Fame in 2010. (IEEE)
  • Duggan, Robert Jr. - served the members of IEEE for more than sixty years beginning with being an officer in both AIEE and IRE, predecessors to IEEE. Bob held several offices in the Atlanta Section, Region 3 and at the Institute level. He was elected as the Region 3 Director for 1984-85 and as the Vice President of the Regional Activities Board (RAB) for 1987 (IEEE)
  • Dunbar, Bonnie - ceramic engineer and former NASA astronaut. She received her M.S. in ceramic engineering from the University of Washington in 1975. Dunbar began her 27-year career at NASA in 1978, during which time she logged 1,208 hours in orbit on five space missions. She earned her Ph.D. in mechanical/biomedical engineering from the University of Houston early in her career. Dunbar became the Assistant Director for University Research and Affairs at the Johnson Space Center in 1998, a position which she held for five years. Her final position with NASA was as Associate Director of Technology Integration and Risk Management at the Johnson Space Center's Space and Life Directorate. Dunbar then served as President and CEO of the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington and now leads the University of Houston's STEM Center and is a faculty member of the Cullen College of Engineering (SWE)
  • Durrani, Sajjad - Space communications pioneer, COMSAT, NASA, and an IEEE Life Fellow (IEEE)
  • Durrani, Tariq - IEEE Life Fellow, Research Professor with the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, U.K. He has authored 350 publications and supervised 45 Ph.D. scholars. His research interests include AI, signal processing, and technology management (IEEE)
  • Dutka, Harriet G. - member of The Association for Iron and Steel Technology (AIST) and its predecessor organization for over 25 years. She has served on the Electric Arc Furnace committee. She has participated in AIST’s Modern Electric Furnace Training seminar for 20 years and in recent years also participated in the Ladle Refractory and Secondary Steelmaking Training seminar. In 2017, her peers recognized her contributions to the electric arc furnace steelmaking community with the AIST’s John Bell Award. 2019 saw her recognized by the AIST as a Distinguished Member and Fellow (AIME)
  • Dwight, Robert - Manager of administration for Westinghouse’s defense center who was instrumental in starting the National Electronics Museum (IEEE)

E

  • Early, James - worked at Bell’s Murray Hill lab 1951-64, the Allentown Lab (final-development oriented) till 1969, than at Fairchild Cameron. He discovered the Early Effect (figuring out that junction transistors are node circuits, not loop circuits) in 1952. He personally designed the transistors for the Vanguard satellite, but generally did more theoretical work. At Allentown he set the goal of packaging silicon devices properly. At Fairchild Cameron he set up the program to work on the buried channel charge coupled device (CCD) (IEEE)
  • Eden, Murray - A mathematician and biophysicist who was the Director of the Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation Program at National Institutes of Health for almost 20 years. (IEEE)
  • Eisenstein, Bruce A. - 2000 IEEE President, IEEE Life Fellow, and Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, spent his career as a faculty member and chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Drexel University. As IEEE President, Eisenstein developed a number of structural and process changes that improved the way IEEE was run. (IEEE)
  • Elden, Walter - advocate for ethics advice and support programs for members since he led the USAB proposals for creating the original IEEE Member Conduct Committee in 1978 (IEEE)
  • Eldon, Charles - 1985 IEEE President, Eldon spent his career in production and manufacturing engineering at HP. As IEEE President, he reestablished a working relationship with the Popov Society, the electrical engineering society of the USSR (IEEE)
  • Eller, Margaret - spent her career in the field of engineering graphics and drafting. She attended the University of Michigan School of Architecture and received a B.S. from Wayne State University and an M.S. in engineering graphics from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Eller worked in drafting, as an engineering illustrator, and as a technical writer from World War II until the mid-1950s. In the 1950s, she began teaching at a Detroit high school where she taught architectural and mechanical drafting, later moving on to an assistant professorship in engineering graphics at Ferris State University. Eller later taught engineering graphics in the College of Engineering at Louisiana State University, the position from which she retired in 1980 (SWE)
  • Engel, Gerald - held teaching and research positions at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Old Dominion University, and Christopher Newport University. In 1984 he came to the University of Connecticut at Stamford, and became the first holder of the Leonhardt Chair of Computer Science and Engineering and served as the interim Director of the Waterbury Campus of the University. From 1991 to 1995, he was on loan from the University to the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate (CISE) of the National Science Foundation, where he served as a program director (1991-1993) and acting deputy director for Computer and Computation Research (1994-1995) (IEEE)
  • Engel, Joel - His career was largely at Bell Labs from 1959 to 1983. His first major work was on mobile telephone systems engineering; in 1969-72, with Phil Porter and Dick Frenkiel he came up with the basic plan for cellular, mobile radio/telephone communications, Advanced Mobile Phone System, presented by AT&T and accepted by the FCC a decade later—though not actually put into national use until the 1980s. He spent two years working on regulatory policy in AT&T’s corporate planning department, then returned to Bell Labs, 1975-83. There he did research on videotext services and energy management systems. From 1983 to 1987 he was VP of engineering, and then of R&D, for Satellite Business Systems (SBS), working on high-speed data and voice communications via satellite. He then moved to Ameritech, one of the Baby Bell companies, where he set up their new laboratories. While there, Ameritech did much development of digital, fiber optic, e-mail, and voice messaging technologies (IEEE)
  • Engel, Ruth - active in the steel industry since 1979, when she began as an engineer at Armco (now AK Steel). She became a research engineer there in 1983 and was then named a senior process engineer in 1990. In 2004, she joined ANH Refractories (today HarbisonWalker International) as a senior applications specialist focused on the brick market for the production of stainless steels. Since 2006, she has been a consultant to the industry. (AIME)
  • Engelson, Irving - took a position with RCA, most notably as a teacher at the RCA Institute. After he completed his education he taught briefly in colleges in New Jersey, before taking up a position as an engineering Dean at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He later transitioned from academia to several administrative positions at the IEEE including Director for Technical Activities and Managing Director for Corporate Activities (IEEE)
  • Espenschied, Lloyd - worked for AT&T designing loading coils and invented a new kind of loading coil. By 1915, he was involved in high-frequency wire transmission and wireless telephony. Early experiments and demonstrations found Espenschied climbing 160 foot frozen antennas in the ice-glazed hills of Montauk Point, stringing antenna between a water tank and a smokestack in the Hawaiian wildnerness, and building experimental coastal stations on the Jersey shore for short-wave trans-Atlantic telephony. Espenschied's work in the development of commercial equipment for long lines eventually led to the development of coaxial cable. A charter member of both the Wireless Institute and IRE, Espenschied received over 130 patents during his career and was awarded, among other honors the Television Broadcasters Association medal and the IRE Medal of Honor (IEEE)
  • Estrin, Thelma (1992) - After working in electroencephalography at the Neurological Institute of New York, Estrin worked in Israel on WEIZAC, the region’s first electronic computer. She then joined UCLA’s Brain Research Institute, serving as director of the Data Processing Laboratory. She has held various leadership positions within IEEE and was honored as a Life Fellow in 1977 (IEEE)
  • Estrin, Thelma (2002) (IEEE) (IEEE)
  • Estrin, Thelma (2006) (SWE)
  • Eu, Hong - Eu's employment at Signetics began in process engineering. Eu describes the Signetics company's production model, with wafers produced in the U.S. and assembled in Korea. When Signetics eliminated Korea's role in this process, Eu moved to Oltron Corporation, manufacturer of digital wristwatches, LCD watches, CB radios, and video games (IEEE)
  • Everitt, Bruce W. - became an analyst, working in the semiconductor industry. Everitt moved out to Boston in 1964 to form a company specializing in technology investments named G.S. Grumman and Associates, which later merged as Institutional Division of Cowen and Company (IEEE)
  • Ewanus, Walter - A career-long Westinghouse employee, he worked on many projects including Bomarc, satellite communications, B1B, F-117 and transcontinental communications (IEEE)

F

  • Faggin, Federico - Developed the Silicon Gate Technology, which made possible the fabrication of semiconductor memories and the microprocessor. He also led the 4004 project at Intel (IEEE)
  • Fairhurst, Charles - faculty at University of Minnesota School of Mines and Metallurgy, in 1956, serving as Head for several years until 1970, when the Mining program was joined with Civil Engineering to form the Department of Civil and Mineral Engineering. He was Head of the Joint Department from 1973-87 and retired in 1997 (AIME)
  • Falkie, Tom - Past President and Distinguished Member of SME and Past President and Honorary Member of AIME, pioneer in the use of computers and operations research in mine planning, he joined International Minerals and Chemical in various engineering and management positions in its headquarters and Florida phosphate operations (AIME)
  • Fallon, Alma Martinez - SWE Senior Life Fellow, SWE Past President, ASME Fellow, spent her entire career at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries initially working on the Seawolf submarine engineering division and auxiliary piping and machinery systems design projects in the commercial ship and aircraft carrier programs. She progressed to managing steel fabrication and assembly planning for the USS George H.W.Bush aircraft carrier, the Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier, Virginia class construction programs, and SAP/ERP3, and later served as hull structure construction superintendent for the Ford class (SWE)
  • Fegely, Wayne - Served in many Westinghouse departments, including the Air Arm Division, Radar Development Section, and Advanced Development Engineering, and worked on many projects, including radar, stealth and EAR (IEEE)
  • Feinler, Elizabeth "Jake" - Feinler is an Internet and computer information scientist whose work earned her a place in the Internet Hall of Fame. She spent the bulk of her career at the Stanford Research Institute, where she directed the Network Information Systems Center. She then joined the Ames Research Center at NASA (IEEE)
  • Feisel, Lyle - IEEE Life Fellow, became the founding dean of the Watson School of Engineering at SUNY Binghamton in 1983. He has been an active member of IEEE's Educational Activities Board, the IEEE Education Society, the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), ABET as well as the IEEE Foundation. (IEEE)
  • Ferrate, Gabriel - began to develop electronic traffic control systems in the late 1950s, and his company sold them to the municipality of Barcelona and many other European and South American cities over the next two decades, before it went out of business in the late 1970s. He split his business work with teaching and researching in automatic control, eventually becoming in 1975 a full professor at Barcelona in the chair of Automatic Control. In 1979 he became director of the school of engineers; in 1982 he became the first director of the Polytechnic University, when the engineering school integrated into it (IEEE)
  • Fettweis, Alfred - in 1951, Fettweis joined the International Telephone and Telegraph Company (ITT), where he was involved in carrier telephony and line transmission work. Fettweis used insertion loss method five years before its perfection at Bell Labs and argues that Germany pioneered insertion loss technique because of a lack of quartz crystals. In 1956 he discovered the sensitivity property, later published by Orchard. Fettweis was quick to use new technologies to create filter designs. He developed the wave digital filter in 1969, while teaching at Bochum University in Germany (IEEE)
  • Filas, Barbara A. - started her career in the underground coal mines. She joined the coal industry shortly after passage of the Federal Surface Mining, Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. At the time, this new law shifted emphasis toward obtaining permits for the coal mines and preparation plants that she had been working for. This resulted in her unplanned specialization in the environmental and compliance aspects of mining (AIME)
  • Findlay, Ray - 2002 IEEE President and an IEEE Life Fellow, who spent his career on the faculties of first the University of New Brunswick, and then McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, was the third IEEE President from Canada. Findlay spent much of his presidency implementing improvements to IEEE’s financial systems, and coping with post-9/11 conflicts between IEEE’s U.S. incorporation and its global presence (IEEE)
  • Finn, Bernard - became Curator of Electricity at the Smithsonian in August 1962, a position he held until 2005 when he became Curator Emeritus. He also served as managing editor of ISIS, the journal of the History of Science Society. Finn became formally involved with the IEEE History Committee in a consultant capacity in 1971, later becoming an official committee member. and serving as Committee Chairman from 1980-82 (IEEE)
  • Fischer, Joseph - worked as an engineer for various companies before founding his own, Fischer Custom Communications. He is a former president of the EMC Society (IEEE)
  • Flanagan, James L. - His research has primarily been in voice communications, computer techniques and electroacoustic systems. He was a long-time employee at Bell Labs and served as VP for Research at Rutgers University (IEEE)
  • Flaschen, Steward - worked at Bell Labs, developing a hydrothermal synthesis of barium titanate, as well as working on low-melting glasses for semiconductor insulation. At Motorola, he developed at method of silicon passivation important for the plastic packaging of semiconductors. He oversaw research at ITT, pushing for innovations in such diverse fields as fiber optics and anti-skid braking in automobiles. When he retired in 1986, he became chairman of TranSwitch and was on the board of venture capital companies. In the interview, he also reflects on the importance of corporate leadership in producing new technologies and on the demise of central laboratories charged with conducting general research (IEEE)
  • Flemings, Merton C. - established MIT’s Materials Processing Center in 1980, where he served as director until 1982. That year, he was appointed Head of the Materials Science and Engineering Department, a position he held for 12 years. He was MIT Director of the Singapore-MIT Alliance from 1999 to 2001, and Faculty Director of the Lemelson-MIT Program in invention and innovation at MIT from 2001 to 2009 (AIME)
  • Fletcher, Ann - SWE Fellow, began work as an industrial and patent illustrator for Ford Motor Company, at which she worked for 21 years. Fletcher retired from her position as Technical Assistant to Chief Engineer at the Shatterproof Glass Corporation in 1978. Fletcher was an early member of the Society of Women Engineers, was one of the first two women in the Society of Engineering Illustrators, became the first woman elected as Fellow of the Engineering Society of Detroit, and in 1975 became the first woman appointed to the Michigan State Registration Board of Professional Community Planners (SWE)
  • Floriani, Virgilio - founded Telettra in Milan, one of the principal Italian companies producing telecommunications equipment. In 1977, together with Vittorio Ventafridda, he founded the Floriani Foundation to assist terminally ill patients and fund research for better palliative care. In the interview, he reviews the history and principles of Telettra, influenced heavily by Hewlett-Packard, and its ventures into transistors, digital communications, switching, and telecommunications over power lines (IEEE)
  • Flükiger, René - Worked mainly at the University of Geneva and at Karlsruhe, studied the metallurgy and structure of a variety of superconductivity, and then applied that knowledge to the production of superconducting wires and tapes (IEEE)
  • Flurscheim, Charles - A graduate of Cambridge University and a college apprentice at the Metropolitan Vickers company, Flurscheim became an accomplished specialist in electronic switchgear and circuit breaker operations. During the second world war, Flurscheim designed vital electrical systems which increased British military aircraft safety. Subsequently he contributed to electrical and nuclear power station research. His high-voltage circuit breakers are used in power stations throughout the world. (IEEE)
  • Fong, Art - Worked in the MIT Rad Lab test equipment group on a high-speed oscilloscope, signal generators, thermistor mounts, attenuators, and spectrum analyzers (IEEE)
  • Fong, Terry - spent time at MIT, Carnegie Mellon, and NASA Ames, and Fourth Planet, Inc. as director of the robotics group, and made contributions to virtual reality interfaces and Human-Robot Interaction research (IEEE)
  • Forlizzi, Jodi - worked in human-robot interaction at UPenn and CMU (IEEE)
  • Forney, G. David - Marconi Fellow and an IEEE Life Fellow. His research focused on coding theory and information theory. Specific projects include work on error-correcting codes in deep space missions and on modem development (IEEE)
  • Foster, Ted - Had many Westinghouse positions and worked on many projects, including thick film technology, surveillance radar systems, and Very High Speed Integrated Circuits (IEEE)
  • Fowler, Evelyn - part of the small group of women who were the earliest members of the Society of Women Engineers. She was a charter member of the New York Section in 1949, a founding member of SWE national in 1950, and a founding member of the Connecticut Section in 1954. Fowler graduated from the Art School of Pratt Institute in 1942 and later returned to study chemical engineering after she married an engineer. Upon gaining her bachelor's degree she went to work for her husband's company, the American Actuator Corporation of New York as a drafter and later secretary-treasurer (SWE)
  • Frankiewicz, Ted - more than 30 years' experience with Occidental Petroleum, Unocal Corp., Natco Group, and, currently, SPEC Services. He has a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Chicago, holds 15 patents, and has written more than 25 professional publications. At Unocal, he was responsible for developing the water treatment systems that were installed in the Gulf of Thailand to remove mercury and arsenic as well as residual oil from produced water. At Natco Group he developed an effective vertical column flotation vessel design and used CFD to diagnose problems with existing water treatment equipment, as well as designed new equipment (SPE)
  • Freas, Robert C. - President of Industrial Minerals Resource Consultants Inc. (IMRC), Brentwood, TN, a firm he formed upon his retirement as Vice President, Corporate Development for Franklin Industrial Minerals, Nashville, TN. During his tenure with Franklin, Mr. Freas played a key role in growing the firm from two operations and two mineral commodities to eleven operations and seven different minerals (AIME)
  • Freed, Roy - served in the Army Ordnance Corps and in the Petroleum Administration during World War II, and worked with the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division until 1951, when he went to work in a private law firm. Then Freed began studying new computer technology and recognizing how computers would influence the legal profession. He helped develop the field which became known as computer law. This involved addressing problems such as computer performance, software copyright, taxation on computer technology, and trade secrecy law. Freed worked for the Computer Control Corporation from 1964 to 1970 and for various other law firms, concentrating upon legal matters involving computer communications and other high technologies, and representing suppliers and users of those technologies (IEEE)
  • Freeman, Herbert - published numerous works on geometric patterns from ’61 and was a co-founder with Azriel Rosenfeld of the University of Maryland of the Journal of Computer Graphics and Image Processing in ’70. Later it changed its name to Computer Graphics, Vision, and Image Processing Journal, and with the expansion of the industry, the journal was split into two in the 1990s (IEEE)
  • Freyhardt, Herbert - head of the “Crystal Growth Laboratory” as well as the “Superconductivity Section” of the Institute of Metallphysik (IEEE)
  • Fridkin, Vladimir - In 1955, A.V. Shubnikov and A.S. Zheludev invited Fridkin to study as a postgraduate student at the Institute of Crystallography of the USSR Academy of Sciences. His entire life, since September 1955, has been connected with the Institute of Crystallography. In 1958 Fridkin defended his Candidate dissertation on electrophotography, and in 1964 he defended his Doctoral dissertation on the physics of photoelectrets; both studies were done at the Institute of Crystallography. Fridkin has published more than 300 papers and directed 70 Candidate of Science students and five Doctoral students (IEEE)
  • Friedel, Robert - became the first archivist at the Smithsonian’s Museum of History and Technology (now the National Museum of American History) and curated exhibits on themes like maritime history and Edison’s electric light. Friedel then taught briefly at what is now Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York before joining the IEEE as the first director of the IEEE History Center in August 1980. While director of what was then the Center for History of Electrical Engineering, Friedel was a part of major exhibits such as the Faraday/Maxwell traveling exhibit which started at Electro 1981, and A Century of Electricals which was part of the IEEE Centennial celebrations. He also started the center's newsletter and the IEEE Milestones program, and supervised the initial organization of the IEEE Archives (IEEE)
  • Fruehauf, Hugo - Field Operations Test Engineer at Martin-Marietta, part of a team launching TM-76B Cruise Missiles at Cape Canaveral. Then, while at General Dynamics Astronautics, he was part of Atlas-Agena launches and Titan-I ICBM testing at Vandenberg Air Force Base. He joined Rockwell International (formally North American Rockwell) in 1965 at Mississippi Test Facility as a test/electronic engineer. He became Chief Test conductor for Rockwell’s second stage (the S-II) for the Saturn-V Apollo launch vehicle. After the Apollo program, while at Rockwell’s California division, Fruehauf was Chief Engineer for the design and development of the GPS Satellite from 1973 to 1978. As part of the satellite, he was also the team leader and major developer of the fully radiation hardened 20-yr life space-born Rubidium Vapor Atomic Clock (IEEE)
  • Fuerstenau, Douglas W.- Honorary AIME Member, P. Malozemoff Professor Emeritus of Mineral Engineering in the Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, during the course of his career, he supervised the research of 60 graduate students for their Ph.D. degrees and 65 for their M.S. degrees in the broad field of processing minerals and particulate materials (AIME)
  • Fujimura, Tetsuo - Worked as the director of NGK Company in Japan, where the promotion of engineers to management enforces their belief that quality is paramount (IEEE)
  • Fujita, Den - developed a successful export business during the postwar period and became the president of McDonald’s (Japan) in 1971. In this interview, Fujita discusses his early interest in electronics and his work with General Electric and other American companies as an exporter. Fujita moves on to discuss the development of his own company in which he exported Japanese radios to the United States, among other products. He also reflects on past perceptions of Japanese quality and early American knowledge of electronics (IEEE)
  • Fukada, Eiichi - research member at the Kobayasi Institute of Physical Research (KIPR), Tokyo from 1944 to 1963; British Council Scholar at the Department of Physics, Imperial College of Science and Technology, London from 1956 to 1958; Chief Research Member of the Biopolymer Physics Laboratory, the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Tokyo from 1963 to 1980; Executive Director of RIKEN from 1980 to 1984; Research Advisor at the Institute for Super Materials, ULVAC, Tsukuba from 1987 to 1998; and a member of the Board of Directors at KIPR from 1992 to 2002 (IEEE)
  • Fukuda, Toshio - 2020 IEEE President, an IEEE Life Fellow, an Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, and a medical robotics pioneer (IEEE)
  • Fuller, Leonard - graduated from Cornell University around 1912. Upon graduation, he was employed by the National Electric Signaling Company. He then took a position with the Federal Telegraph Company, where he eventually was named Chief Electrical Engineer. During the 1920s, he worked for General Electric Co. on carrier-current communications, subsequently returning to Federal as Executive Vice President and Chief Engineer. In 1930, he joined the University of California, Berkeley faculty as Chair of the Electrical Engineering department (IEEE)
  • Fung, Bert - Influential in both Aeronautical Engineering and Biomechanics, he is the recipient of the President's National Medal of Science . (IEEE)
  • Furui, Sadaoki - IEEE Life Fellow, authored and co-authored more than 1,000 papers and books mostly in the fields of speech recognition, artificial intelligence, and natural language processing (IEEE)

G

  • Gale, Anita - SWE Life Fellow, AIAA Life Fellow, began her career at Rockwell International, working in structural dynamics and later specializing in payload cargo integration on the Space Shuttle and Commercial Crew programs at both Rockwell and The Boeing Company. She retired in 2016 as a Boeing Associate Technical Fellow (SWE)
  • Galil, Uzia - founder of Elron Electronic Industries Ltd., the first high technology multinational holding company based in Israel and operating worldwide. Elron developed about 25 high-tech companies in Medical Imaging, Defense Electronics, Communications, Machine Vision and Semiconductors. Uzia Galil has served as Chief Executive Officer of Elron for 38 years (1962-1999) and chairman or director of most companies founded by Elron (IEEE)
  • Gallager, Robert - Marconi Fellow and an IEEE Life Fellow, has focused on information theory and data networks, working in fields such as coding, multi-access communication systems, distributed algorithms, routing, congestion control, and random access techniques. He helped found the Codex Corporation (IEEE)
  • Galvin, Robert - chief executive office of Motorola for thirty years. Although he was not trained as an engineer, Galvin successfully managed the company for a number of decades with his ability to think differently from engineers and to push them further (IEEE)
  • Ganzhorn, Karl - a physicist who has specialized primarily in computers and communication technology. He studied physics at the University of Stuttgart, working with Prof. Ulrich Deilinger. He worked for IBM from the mid-1950s to 1986, as scientist, development manager, and director of the IBM laboratory at Sindelfingen until 1963, as head of the German, Austrian, and Swedish labs from 1963 to 1973, as Director for Science and Technology in IBM Europe from 1973 to 975, as Vice-President of telecommunication systems from 1975 to 1978, and as head of IBM Germany’s technical and scientific operations from 1978 to 1986. He also served on the German Science Board, the Federal Bureau of Standards, and other advisory panels (IEEE)
  • Garcia, Oscar - the founding dean of the College of Engineering at University of North Texas and professor of electrical engineering, (IEEE)
  • Gascoigne, Anthony - Founding member of the IEEE Victorian Section, has more than fifty years professional experience in the design, development, evaluation and proving of electrical and electronics equipment for a range of defense, automotive and Industrial applications (IEEE)
  • Gass, Wanda - IEEE Fellow "for contributions to digital signal processors and circuits," made crucial achievements in digital signal processing chip development through her work at Texas Instruments. Before joining TI, Gass studied electrical engineering at Rice University and earned a master's degree in biomedical engineering at Duke University (1980) (IEEE)
  • Gaynor, Gus - long time IEEE member, actively involved with various IEEE committees and boards for over 75 years. Prior to retirement from corporate America, Gas was 3M’s Innovation Director who led major engineering product breakthroughs. Gus served as Founding Editor and Editor-in-Chief of Today’s Engineer, President of the Engineering Management Society, and VP of Education, IEEE Technology and Engineering Management (IEEE)
  • Gazzana-Priaroggia, Paolo - In 1945 he joined R&D Department of Pirelli Cables in Milan, initially in the telecommunication field and then in the power field. In 1950 he became manager of the Power Cables Laboratory. In 1958 he was appointed manager of the R&D Department of Pirelli Cables-Italy, and in 1966 Chief Engineer of the Cable Division-Italy. In 1972 he was given the responsibility of the whole Pirelli Cable International Sector as Chief Engineer and R&D Director. Retired in 1982, he served Pirelli SpA as Consulting Engineer until 1987. (IEEE)
  • Geddes, Leslie - Electrical engineer and physiologist who was involved in the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society and was a 2006 National Medal of Technology recipient (IEEE)
  • Gedney, Ron - In addition to his significant contributions in the field of computer packaging and manufacturing, Ron Gedney served in a variety of positions as a distinguished member of IEEE CPMT Society. As an employee of IBM, Gedney was involved in the procurement of components, the development of reliability standard tests, the production of chip and circuit technology, and the management of a thin film substrate program. He served as program chairman of ECTC and on the board of governors of CPMT. He subsequently ran and served as vice president and president of the CPMT. During his tenure, he helped to develop an efficient organizational structure and a successful packaging technical committee, as well as expand the CPMT awards plan and help restore CPMT’s financial security (IEEE)
  • Gerdes, Virginia - Worked as a bench technician, did calculations and worked on the MIT Rad Lab books (IEEE)
  • Geselowitz, David - Geselowitz became the senior person under Herman Schwan, through which he got involved with the IRE, a predecessor to the IEEE, which he believes was a key organization in advancing biomedical engineering, along with other groups such as the ASME . He and Okada, as well as others, continued the work of four major labs that made the core of what he refers to as "the first generation" of biomedical engineering. This work eventually led to achieving results from the cellular activity in the heart. (IEEE)
  • Getting, Ivan A. (1991) - 1978 IEEE President, Getting spent part of his career at MIT, and part in industry, both with Raytheon and as president of the Aerospace Corporation. As IEEE President, he reached out to industry leaders so that they would understand the role and importance of IEEE as a professional society (IEEE)
  • Getting, Ivan A. (1995) (IEEE)
  • Gibbons, James - studied engineering at Northwestern, graduating in 1953. He got his PhD at Stanford, and became a professor there soon thereafter. After a brief period working with William Shockley, at Stanford’s direction, he set up a solid-state electronics lab at Stanford. The work at this lab spawned the graphics chip for SGI and the MIPS chip for risk processors. After setting up the lab, Gibbons moved over to work on the physics of fabrication—wafer fab technology, with epitaxy and ion implantation. (IEEE)
  • Gibbs, Betty - has been involved in the minerals industry for more than 40 years. As an engineer, author, university professor and consultant, Ms. Gibbs has been at the forefront of technology development and adaptation for the mining industry. She has extensive experience in geological database development, resource modeling and is familiar with the requirements of international codes for resource modeling. Ms. Gibbs has experience with a wide variety of minerals and deposit types including seam and bedded deposits; massive, disseminated deposits; and vein deposits. Ms. Gibbs is an active participant in professional organizations and societies, has been a member of the Society of Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME) since 1960, and is currently the Executive Director of the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America (MMSA) (AIME)
  • Gibbs, Sam - Recognizing the need for improvements in sucker rod pumping technology, Dr. Sam Gibbs developed a mathematical method for analyzing rod pumping operations using the wave equation. After forming Nabla Corporation with business partner Ken Nolan, Gibbs went on to develop the SAM Well Manager, which is reportedly the most popular pump off control (POC) in the world today. Gibbs and Nolen also developed the first on-site diagnostic computer to calculate real time parameters of and determine any problems with a pumping unit and its down-hole equipment. Gibbs has written more than 24 technical papers and an engineering textbook on sucker rod 2 pumping. In 2011, Dr. Gibbs was inducted into the Petroleum Hall of Fame for his contributions to technological innovation in the petroleum industry. (SPE)
  • Gilbert, Juan - Juan Gilbert is the Banks Family Preeminence Endowed Professor and Department Chair in Computer & Information Science & Engineering at the University of Florida. Dr. Gilbert’s main research area in human-computer interaction. He holds a PhD from the University of Cincinnati and has formerly taught at Auburn and Clemson Universities. (IEEE)
  • Gillette, Dorothy - Worked in the MIT Rad Lab experimental system group doing signal threshold studies (IEEE)
  • Gilliland, Clinton - graduated with a BS in Physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1959, and from 1960 to 1964 was mainly operating field sites of HF radio receiving equipment collecting data from distant transmitters. His largest project at the Stanford RSL was design and building the antenna beam control for the 2.5 km long array of whip antennas built in the California central valley. In 1968, he went to Barry Research, and was involved with circuit design for the Chirp sounder production designs. In 1968 and 1969 he spent several multi-month stays in Routhwesten, Germany, Aviano, Italy, and San Vito, Italy operating BR Chirpsounder receiving equipment at US military sites (IEEE)
  • Gini, Maria - Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. Before joining the University of Minnesota she was a research associate at the Politecnico of Milan, Italy, and a visiting research associate in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Stanford University (IEEE)
  • Ginzton, Edward - Worked on the development of klystron and linear accelerators and was a Director of the Microwave Lab (IEEE)
  • Giordmaine, Joseph - retired as vice president of physical science research at the NEC laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Toronto in 1955 and did his Ph.D. work at Columbia University on the use of the maser amplifier in planetary astronomy, working with Charles Townes. After leaving Columbia, Giordmaine went to work at Bell Labs in 1961, working with ruby lasers and harmonic generation, eventually moving into nonlinear optics. In 1965 Giordmaine and Bob Millar worked together to develop an optical parametric oscillator. In the 1970s Giordmaine was promoted to laboratory director, and from the 1970s through the early 1980s held a variety of management position at Bell Labs in the research area and, eventually, in the company's development area. In the late 1980s Giordmaine left Bell Labs to help set up a Western-style basic research laboratory for the Japanese company NEC, where as vice president of physical science research Giordmaine also sits on the Board of Fellows (IEEE)
  • Givans, Natalie - senior vice president at Booz Allen in the company's defense business. As a child she was inspired by the television show Star Trek and originally wanted to become an astronaut. Ultimately she she pursued electrical engineering and assistive technologies at MIT, where she received a bachelor's degree in 1984. She began her career at Booz Allen as an engineer designing signaling plans for the company's STU-III secure telephone project, and has remained at the company throughout her career in cryptography and system security engineering. Givans is a life member of the Society of Women Engineers and a recipient of the Society's Suzanne Jenniches Upward Mobility Award. Particularly interested in diversity and work-life integration initiatives, she serves on the Booz Allen Women's Leadership Initiative and represents the company on SWE's Corporate Partnership Council and in the Girl Scouts of America's Make the Connection program (SWE)
  • Glazer, Mike - In 1976, he was appointed Lecturer in Physics at the Clarendon Laboratory Oxford and as an Official Fellow and Tutor at Jesus College Oxford. Mike Glazer's research has mainly been in understanding the relationship between physical properties of crystals and their structures. He is perhaps best known for his classification system for tilted octahedra in perovskites. He is also one of the co-founders of Oxford Cryosystems Ltd, which supplies the world market in low-temperature apparatus for crystallographers (IEEE)
  • Gleiter, Roberta - project engineer and technical manager at Aerospace Corporation. One of the top students in her class at Purdue University, she received a degree in chemical engineering in 1960. Unable to find employment because of her gender, Gleiter instead married and raised three children. In 1980 she participated in a workforce reentry program for women engineers at California State University—Northridge, which was funded by the National Science Foundation. After completing the program and interning at the Aerospace Corporation, she accepted a full-time position at the company and has remained there throughout her career. She served as national president of the Society of Women Engineers from 1998-1999 and was elected into the Society's College of Fellows. Also a Fellow in the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering and a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, International Council on Systems Engineering, and ASME, Gleiter was named an Aerospace Corporation Woman of the Year and received the Outstanding Chemical Engineering Award from Purdue University in 2008 (SWE)
  • Godsey, Frank W. - In 1934 he moved to Sprague Electric, where he worked for six years, holding the positions of assistant production manager and chief electrical engineer. In 1940 he joined Westinghouse in their new products division located in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Near the end of WWII, Godsey was instrumental in the establishment of Westinghouse's military division, based in Baltimore. He continued with Westinghouse as manager of the Baltimore Divisions until 1951, when he left to head Electronic Communications Incorporated, a company that developed military communications equipment. In 1959, he purchased ECI's research division, which became Advanced Technology Corporation. ATI's primary work was in millimeter-wave devices and solid-state technology (IEEE)
  • Goetzberger, Adolf - an applied physicist who has specialized primarily in semiconductors and solar energy. He studied physics at the University of Munich, working with Prof. Gerlach. He worked for Siemens from 1955 to 1958, at the Shockley Laboratory from 1958 to 1963, and at Bell Labs from 1968 to 1973. He was director of The Institute for Electrical Materials (The Institute for Applied Solid State Physics) from 1973 to 1980, and director of Institute for Solar Energy Systems from 1980 to 1994 (IEEE)
  • Gold, Ben - joined the staff at Lincoln Labs in 1953 working there through 1981 on the Application of probability theory to communications. He also designed and implemented a device to recognize hand-sent Morse code signals and a device to measure the pitch of speech for use in voice-coding systems. He contributed to the theory and application of voice coding systems for digital data rate reduction, the development of the theory of digital signal processing, and the design and development of high speed signal processing computers and parallel computers (IEEE)
  • Goldberg, Adele - Goldberg began her career as a researcher at Xerox, where she developed the programming language Smalltalk and managed the System Concepts Laboratory. She continued to develop Smalltalk technology as the head of ParcPlace Systems. She served as president of the Association for Computing Machinery and received a Lifetime Achievement Award from PC Magazine in 1990 (IEEE)
  • Goldberg, Ken - IEEE Fellow, has spent most of his career at Berkeley. Much of his work has centered on the intersection of robotics, art, and social networks. He has also worked extensively on automation, and is the founding editor of the IEEE Transactions of Automation Science and Engineering (IEEE)
  • Goldsmith, Alfred N. - founding member of the IRE, first editor of the Proceedings of the IRE, and a member of the IRE Board of Directors for its entire existence. In 1919, he joined RCA, where he held a variety of positions, including vice-president of RCA Photophone, and vice president in general engineering. Goldsmith received over one hundred patents in the field of electronics and was director emeritus of the IEEE (IEEE)
  • Goldsmith, Andrea - Dean of Engineering and Applied Science and the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Princeton University (IEEE)
  • Goldsmith, Thomas - attended Furman University in South Carolina, graduating in 1931. He received his Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University in 1936, where he was involved in research on cathode ray devices. It was as a graduate student that Goldsmith first had contact with the Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories. Upon receiving his doctorate, Goldsmith went to work for Du Mont as a director of research, a position he held until he left the company in 1966. Goldsmith then returned to Furman University as a physics professor and director of the audio-visual department (IEEE)
  • Golub, Gene - Fletcher Jones Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, was one of the preeminent numerical analysts of his generation. Born in Chicago in 1932, he was educated at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He had been at Stanford since 1962 and became a professor there in 1970. He had advised almost thirty doctoral students, many of whom have themselves achieved distinction. Gene Golub was an important figure in numerical analysis and pivotal to creating the NA-Net and the NA-Digest, as well as the International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (IEEE)
  • Gordon, Eugene - worked for Bell Laboratories, where his first research involved inventing a microwave tube called a cyclotron wave amplifier, for use in submarine cables. He switched over to the new field of lasers, developing gas lasers. He was early concerned with the lifetime and reliability of lasers, and did the practical work of making single frequency oscillators, frequency stabilizers, etc, which turned laser technology into a practical communication system. He co-developed the first CW argon ion laser—which eventually had medical applications, such as saving from blindness people with diabetic retinopathy. He then helped develop the display and imaging devices for AT&T’s picturephone system (through 1970). In the 1970s he worked to develop solid-state versions of these devices—co-inventing CCD, the basis for color cameras, fax machines, etc (IEEE)
  • Gordon, Ruth - first hired by Isadore Thompson to oversee the construction of a hospital in southern California. Gordon became the first female member of the Structural Engineers Association of Northern California in 1953 and the first female state-certified structural engineer in 1959. She worked for the Structural Safety Section of the California Office of the State Architect from 1959 to 1984, primarily overseeing the construction and renovation of hospitals nad schools. In 1984 Gordon founded her own company, Pegasus Engineering, Inc., and conducted safety and earthquake survivability studies and post-earthquake evaluations on hospitals and schools (SWE)
  • Gorman, Judith - Managing Director of the IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) from 1998 to 2012, first joined the staff of the IEEE in 1984. Her educational background in the liberal arts prepared her for an early career in the publishing industry, migrating from the magazine industry, to educational publishing, and finally to the technical environment of the IEEE. She began her IEEE career directing Standards publishing and marketing. In 1991, she became Associate Staff Director of Standards, and in 1995, Staff Director (IEEE)
  • Grabbe, Dimitry - IEEE Life Fellow, played an integral part in advancing U.S. space exploration. His pioneering work has produced nearly 500 U.S. and foreign patents covering machine design, semiconductor packaging, electronics assembly and optoelectronic connector design. His work in printed circuit board technology for electronic packaging led to the development of large, multi-layer printed circuit boards. This proved crucial in helping U.S. astronauts gain greater real-time control of their space-exploration activities. In 1964, Mr. Grabbe founded the Maine Research Corporation which specialized in high-end printed circuit boards; the company was dissolved in 1972. He joined AMP, Inc. in 1973, and helped it become a world leader in electrical/electronic connector technology, test socket technology and miniature semiconductor packages. Mr. Grabbe assisted Dr. Pryputniewicz, professor of mechanical engineering and founding director of the center for holographic studies and laser micro-mechaTronics (CHSLT) at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, Mass. with research on gyroscopes and accelorometers (IEEE)
  • Graham, Lois - the first woman to graduate in engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in 1945, the first to receive an M.S.M.E. from the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the first to receive a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in the country. Upon graduating from RPI, Graham worked for the Carrier Corporation as a test engineer. She returned to academia after 18 months, and worked as a graduate assistant at IIT, where she would spend her entire teaching career. Graham became the first woman faculty member in the engineering department at IIT when she became an instructor in 1949, and was one of the few women to hold the rank of full professor when she became one in 1975. She was appointed Assistant Director for Engineering and Science in 1974 and as Program Center Director of the Education and Experience in Engineering Program in 1977. Her many professional affiliations include the Society of Women Engineers, of which she was a fellow and national past president (1955-1956), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, and the American Society for Engineering Education (SWE)
  • Graham, Martin - Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley. Beginning his work with the Brookhaven and Los Alamos Laboratories, Graham later moved to Rice University, before settling down at Berkeley (IEEE)
  • Graham, Susan - IEEE Life Fellow and an Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, has devoted her research as a software engineer to computer programming language implementation, developing the Titanium system and Harmonia framework. She was the first woman professor of engineering at UC Berkeley. In 2009, she received the von Neumann Medal from IEEE (IEEE)
  • Granger, John - 1970 IEEE President, Granger was an engineering entrepreneur who founded the successful company Granger Associates. As IEEE President, he pursued IEEE’s relationships with national engineering societies, and wrestled with the question of IEEE sponsoring meetings of classified research (IEEE)
  • Gray, Robert M. (1991) - Electrical Engineer, and an IEEE Life Fellow, who made significant contributions in speech processing, developed one of the first examples of a universal code and popularized the algorithm for vector quantifier design (IEEE)
  • Gray, Robert M. (1998) (IEEE)
  • Greatbatch, Wilson - Electrical engineer who advanced pacemaker battery technology and created his own company, Greatbatch, Inc., to develop and sell pacemaker batteries (IEEE)
  • Green, Michael - licensed mechanical engineer in the State of California and is a founding board member of the IEEE Council on Applied Superconductivity. He has worked at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Kernforschungszentrum Karlsrue, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Oxford University (IEEE)
  • Green, Paul - worked at Lincoln Lab 1951-69, IBM 1969-97, and Tellabs, Inc. since. At Lincoln he helped develop RAKE, the first operational spread spectrum system still the basis for spread spectrum cellular telephones. Via some false starts, he figured out a way to do radar mapping in astronomy. In seismology, his idea of a Large Aperture Seismic Array proved less effective than theory had predicted. At IBM he worked on speech recognition, peer (decentralized) networking, an the all-optical IBM 9729 network, using fiber optic technology (1987-96). Since then at Tellabs he has been continuing optical network research, particularly on the optical cross-connect, an optical switch. He has had significant involvement in the IEEE Information Theory Society and the IEEE Communications Society throughout his career, particularly in the latter (IEEE)
  • Gregory, John - Worked in many Westinghouse groups, including the Digital Systems Group, Control Data Systems and Computing and Data Systems. He also worked on many projects, including AWAC, AN/AYK-8, millicomputers and BORAM (IEEE)
  • Gretsch, William - Worked in several Westinghouse management positions and on projects such as AWACS, Apollo lunar TV and airships (IEEE)
  • Grier, David Alan - spent much of the past decade helping the IEEE Computer Society develop new electronic products, editing its periodicals, and writing for its members. He has served as editor in chief of IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, as chair of the Magazine Operations Committee, and as an editorial board member of Computer (IEEE)
  • Gries, David - Worked to advance the teaching of computer science and is known for his research in compiling and in programming methodology (IEEE)
  • Griffin, Denise - worked as a systems engineer at GTE Government Systems for six years, after which she worked in several Dot-Com companies and as a technology partner program manager at a company acquired by Cisco. Griffin went on maternity leave in 2001 with the intent to return to work part-time. The Dot-Com economy faltered during her leave and her part-time arrangement disappeared, however, so she decided to pause her career to stay home with her children. Important to maintaining her professional contacts and identity as an engineer, Griffin became actively involved in the Society of Women Engineers and IEEE during this time away from work, volunteering at both the local and national levels (SWE)
  • Gringarten, Alain - holds the Chair of Petroleum Engineering at Imperial College in London, where he is also director of the Centre for Petroleum Studies. He has made major contributions in many breakthrough advances in well test interpretation, including: the use of Greens functions; the "Gringarten type curves" for wells with wellbore storage and skin, fractured wells, and wells with double porosity behavior; the first major commercial computer-aided interpretation software; and a well-test interpretation methodology which has become standard in the oil industry (SPE)
  • Grubbe, Deborah - chemical engineering executive. Her husband, James Porter, is Vice President of Engineering and Operations at Dupont and received the Society of Women Engineer's Rodney D. Chipp Memorial Award (SWE)
  • Grudin, Jonathan - For many years, he has participated actively in the human-computer interaction and computer supported cooperative work communities. He has worked as a software engineer at Wang Laboratories, a team leader at MCC, a professor of information and computer science at University of California Irvine, and as a researcher at Microsoft (IEEE)
  • Guarrera, John - 1974 IEEE President, Guarrera had a varied career, beginning at the MIT Rad Lab, going from there into industry, and finally into academic administration at California State—Northridge. As an IEEE President, he was instrumental in setting up the USAC, the predecessor of IEEE-USA, and he championed the professional needs of engineers (IEEE)
  • Gueldenpfennig, Klaus - began working for DeTeWe (Deutsche Telephonwerke) in 1954, later taking employment with Telefunken. Gueldenpfennig came to the United States in 1965, working in New York City for two years for DeTeWe and Telefunken. He then spent eleven years working on switching system development for Stromberg, a career which brought him to Rochester, New York, and which produced multiple circuit and switching patents. Gueldenpfennig received an M.S. in electrical engineering at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1974 and received an M.B.A., again at RIT, in 1977. When Stromberg relocated to Florida in 1978, Gueldenpfennig stayed in New York and launched his company Redcom (IEEE)
  • Gulden, Vince - In 1941, Joe Desch recruited Gulden to the National Cash Register Company. At NCR, Gulden worked with radios, vacuum tubes, and counting circuits. Gulden also recounts his role in the World War II effort at NCR, including work on the Bombe project and Rattler code-breaking. After the war, Gulden worked on transistors and various accounting machines, staying at NCR until 1973 (IEEE)
  • Gulyaev, Yury - IEEE Life Fellow, President of IEEE Russian Section from 1988-2016, worked at the Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics (IRE) Ac. Sci. USSR (later RAS) as a Researcher, Senior Researcher and Head of the Department. He served as Deputy Director since 1972, Director of IRE RAS since 1988, and Scientific Supervisor of IRE RAS since 2004. Gulyaev is the author of more than 500 scientific papers and 11 monographs, and has more than 60 patents (IEEE)
  • Gupta, Satya - a Baker Hughes Technology Fellow, he was previously Business Development Director, Technology for Baker Hughes pressure pumping (BJ Services). He has more than 37 years of oil field chemical product development and applications experience (SPE)

H

  • Haddad, Abraham, H. - After graduating, Haddad began teaching at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Most of his career has been in academia. Haddad has also taught at Georgia Tech and Northwestern University, and worked at Dynamics Research Corporation and the National Science Foundation. He has been active in the IEEE’s Control Systems Society – holding positions such as editor of The Transactions on Automatic Control, secretary, chairman of the publications committee and Control Systems Society President in 1992. He also served as secretary for the American Automatic Control Council (A2C2) from 1990 to 2003 (IEEE)
  • Hagita, Norihiro - Educated at Keio University, Hagita has split his career between NTT (Nippon Telephone) and ATR (The Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute). Much of his work has focused on agent systems and pattern recognition (IEEE)
  • Haibt, Lois - Part of the first generation of computer programmers, Haibt was the only woman on the FORTRAN team at IBM (IEEE)
  • Hall, Robert N. - Physicist most known for his work at GE on the semiconductor laser (IEEE)
  • Hamilton, Clark A. - IEEE Life Fellow, spent most of his career at NIST in Boulder, Colorado. His many awards include the IEEE Council on Superconductivity Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012, and two U.S. Department of Commerce Gold Medals for his work on superconducting integrated circuits using Josephson devices, 1984 and 1989 (IEEE)
  • Han, Ki Sun - From 1957 through 1963, Mr. Han worked as an engineer at the HLKZ-TV station, American Forces Korean National Television (AFKN), and the Korean Broadcasting Systems (KBS). In 1963 he joined the Tonyung Broadcasting Company (TBC), a broadcasting company jointly established by Samsung, Gold Star, and other companies. In 1969, Mr. Han moved to a position at Samsung Electronics, and he became the company's CEO in 1973. At the time of this 1996 interview, Ki Sun Han served as a senior advisor on Japanese business to Samsung's CEO (IEEE)
  • Hang, Daniel - Hang spent a few years at General Electric in Schenectady, New York working on war projects, such as SONAR. He later attended the University of Illinois where he earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in electrical engineering in 1941 and 1949, respectively, and began teaching at the university, where he remained until his retirement in 1984. While on the Electrical Engineering faculty, Hang helped develop the nuclear engineering department at the university, especially the master’s degree program, and later held a joint appointment in the Electrical and Nuclear Engineering departments (IEEE)
  • Hannegan, Don - Managed Pressure Drilling (MPD) Strategic Technology Development Manager for Weatherford, Registered Professional Engineer, recipient of The World Oil 2004 Innovative Thinker Award for his role in developing MPD tools & techniques, SPE 2006-2007 Distinguished Lecturer (Offshore Applications of MPD), IADC Exemplary Service Award recipient and member of Pi Epsilon Tau Petroleum Engineering Honor Society (SPE)
  • Hansson, Carolyn - entered academia, joining Columbia University as an assistant professor of metallurgical engineering before moving to the State University of New York at Stony Brook. In 1973 she was appointed associate professor, and in 1975, she became chair of the Department of Materials Science. In 1976 Carolyn went to work for AT&T Bell Laboratories, joined the Danish Corrosion Centre in 1980, first as a research scientist and then as head of the research department, returned to academia and joined Queen’s University as a professor and the head of the Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering. Since 1996 Carolyn has been a professor of materials engineering at the University of Waterloo. She was the Vice-President of University Research from 1996 to 2000 and served as the co-director of the Centre for Pavement and Transportation Technology from 2001 to 2005 (AIME)
  • Harder, Edwin - power engineer, inventor, builder of the Anacom computer, and former president of the American Federation of Information Processing Societies. Harder addressed many challenging and interesting problems of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s — especially in the regulation and control of power systems. Some of these problems involved the need for additional control as power grids were interconnected and increased in scale; others concerned the regulation of new power machinery (generators and motors) and systems incorporating them (steel mills, paper mills, and so on). His most important contribution was to the Anacom computer (IEEE)
  • Harder, Keld - After receiving his degree in electrical engineering, his work at Bang & Olufsen focused first on the engineering of products including the Beolit 500 and Beomaster 900 radios. His later work at B&O focused on marketing radio and television. His background as an engineer benefited him both as a salesman and lobbyist, providing technical credibility and enabling him to identify technological trends (IEEE)
  • Hardy, Ann - worked as a programmer in the early field of shared, network-based computing out of which the Internet would eventually develop. She got her start at IBM, later moving to Tymshare where she became the first woman vice-president before founding her own companies, KeyLogic and Agorics (IEEE)
  • Harness, Arminta - national president of SWE from 1976-1978, graduated with an aeronautical engineering degree from the University of Southern California in 1955 and became the U.S. Air Force's first woman engineer, blazing a trail for women engineers in the armed forces during her 24 year career and rising to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. In 1963 she was assigned to work on the Gemini manned space Program at Air Force Space Systems. Harness served as Deputy Chief of Engineering and later as Chief of Program Control for the Gemini Target Vehicle Program, during which program she became the first woman to receive the specialty rank of Staff Development Engineer and the first woman to receive both Senior and Master Missileman Badges (SWE)
  • Harper, Charles - Chemical engineer who was involved in many Westinghouse projects, including Aero 13 and VHSIC, as well as in the progress of electronic packaging and plastic. He has also written and taught extensively and been involved in professional groups (IEEE)
  • Harris, Buddy - became a full-time telephone company employee. During World War II, he worked on developing airborne radar systems in the Navy. After the war, he managed the plastics division of a Virginia company. In June 1949, he moved to Dallas to join Geophysical Service Inc., the Dallas company that would become Texas Instruments. During the war, he had met Patrick Haggerty and Eugene McDermott, Geophysical Service employees who became key TI executives. By 1951, Mr. Harris was Texas Instruments' vice president of marketing. He joined the company's board of directors in 1963 and served in that post until his retirement in 1998 (IEEE)
  • Harris, Leonard - devoted his career to making “mines safer and more responsible.”, working in Australia, the Gold Coast, Peru and worked for Newmont Mining Corporation in New York City (AIME)
  • Harris, Richard - spent much of his career at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where he researched superconductive technologies and introduced NIST to lithography and superconducting integrated circuits. He was also the Group Leader for the Cryoelectronic Metrology Group on superconducting electronics as well the Quantum Devices Group (IEEE)
  • Hartmanis, Juris - Made significant contributions in the field of computational complexity theory and was one of founders and the first chairman of the Cornell computer science department (IEEE)
  • Hassenzahl‎‎, William V. - was with the Lawrence Berkeley National and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories from 1980 to 1993 and with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory from 1967 to 1980. He was President of Advanced Energy Analysis, Piedmont, CA, a consulting firm specializing in the areas of electric power and applied physics. His publications include over 200 technical papers and two books on energy storage. He has participated in the development of several superconducting magnets and other superconducting systems, and he is active in the research on medical systems using superconductivity. Hassenzahl is a Member of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity, where he represents the IEEE Power Engineering Society (IEEE)
  • Hatfield, Dale - Awarded an Honorary Doctor of Science degree by the University of Colorado for, inter alia, his commitment to the development of interdisciplinary telecommunications studies. Hatfield has nearly fifty years of experience in telecommunications policy and regulation, spectrum management and related areas. (IEEE)
  • Havard, John F. - Starting in 1935, Jack spent 17 years with United States Gypsum Company, advancing through operating, engineering and exploration positions to works manager and finally to chief engineer of mines, headquartered in Chicago. (AIME)
  • Hawthorn, Paula - managed software development at Hewlett-Packard, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and a number of influential start-ups. She helped open the field of computing to women, founding support groups at universities and corporations (IEEE)
  • Hayashi, Izuo - Played a key role in the development of the laser, and worked on achieving continuous-wave operation of the aluminum gallium arsenide laser at different temperatures (IEEE)
  • Hayes, Peter C. - has been proactive in the development and growth of the metallurgical engineering program at the University of Queensland since the mid-1980s. He was appointed a full professor in 2001 and Program Leader in Metallurgical Engineering in 2004, a position he holds to this day. In the early 2000s, Peter saw an opportunity to build capability in hydrometallurgy in the Department, a strategic decision that underpins the continuing success of UQ’s program (AIME)
  • Hayhurst, Floyd - purchasing agent and assistant to Ed Tudor at Regency while the TR1 radio was being developed. He began at Regency when it was still a small operation and stayed until 1958 (IEEE)
  • Haynes, Byron - Reservoir Engineering Learning Advisor for Shell Global Solutions in Houston, Texas and is responsible for all Reservoir Engineering Training worldwide in Shell. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin with BS and MS Degrees in Petroleum Engineering (SPE)
  • Hays, Gwen - Worked on computer-aided design, helping design computer languages such as Ada, and was also involved in radar development and was program manager of projects such as High Energy Laser Radar and Acquisition Tracking System (HELRATS) (IEEE)
  • Hazle, Marlene - started her career in distributed computer systems at the RAND Corporation working on the SAGE system. After moving to MITRE, she developed software for the first automated air traffic controller system and tactical warfare systems for the Air Force (IEEE)
  • Heath, Fred - Did collaborative work at the MIT Rad Lab with RAD transferring British radar technology to Canadian research and production (IEEE)
  • Hecker, Siegfried S. - Professor (Research) Emeritus in the Department of Management Science and Engineering, and Senior Fellow Emeritus of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University. He is also director emeritus at the Los Alamos National Laboratory/University of California, where he served as director from 1986-1997 and senior fellow until July 2005. He joined the Los Alamos National Laboratory as a technical staff member in 1973, following a postdoctoral assignment there in 1968-1970 and a summer graduate student assignment in 1965 (AIME)
  • Heinz, Dale E. - 2013 AIME President, joined The Republic Steel Corp., Cleveland, Ohio, in the blast furnace department as a management trainee. He held a series of supervisory positions of growing responsibility through 1994 with Republic Steel and then LTV Steel post-merger (AIME)
  • Heirman, Don - IEEE Life Fellow, spent most of his career at Bell Labs, and since has retirement from the Labs, has built a thriving EMC consulting business. Much of his work has been on EMC Standards. He served as EMC Society President in 1980-1981 (IEEE)
  • Hellman, Martin - IEEE Life Fellow, an Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, and a researcher in cryptography. His work has been applied to public key encryption systems (IEEE)
  • Hersom, Bobby - developed software for Elliot Brothers, Rothamstead, and Hatfield Polytechnic (IEEE)
  • Hewlett, William - Co-founder and President of Hewlett-Packard and 1954 IRE president (IEEE)
  • Hickel, Maggie - industrial engineer, a past president of the Society of Women Engineers, and a SWE Fellow (SWE)
  • Hickman, Clarence Nichols - early associate and long-time friend of rocket inventor Frank Goddard. Hickman met Goddard while attending graduate school at Clark University and they worked together during WWI at Mt. Lowell Observatory, and later at Clark's Industrial Research Laboratory during the early 1920s. Hickman also held positions at the National Bureau of Standards and the American Piano Company. He joined Bell Laboratories in 1930, retiring in 1950. During WWII, Hickman headed Section H of the NDRC. He made important contributions in the design of bazookas during the war and magnetic recording after the war (IEEE)
  • Hillier, James - Developed the first scanning electron microscope in the United States and served as the director of research at RCA (IEEE)
  • Hirose, Shigeo - attended graduate school and spent his career at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, where his research has focused on snake and spider robots (IEEE)
  • Hirzinger, Gerd - spent his career at DLR, the German national aeronautics and space research center, where he has played a leading role in the development of robots for use in space (IEEE)
  • Hoagland, Albert - IEEE Fellow, While a graduate student, he became a consultant to IBM with key magnetic head design and recording responsibilities for the Random Access Method of Accounting and Control (RAMAC) disk drive, the first hard disk data storage device. Later he joined IBM, making major contributions to magnetic disk storage technology and the design of magnetic disk drives, including the first studies on track following servo positioning. With IBM for many years, including serving as Director for Technical Planning for the IBM Research Division, he played a principal role in the formation and leadership of an Industry/University consortium that established the first University Centers to support data storage technology. He left IBM in 1984 to found and be Director of the Institute for Information Storage Technology (IIST) at Santa Clara University and a professor of Electrical Engineering. He later established and also ran the Magnetic Disk Heritage Center (MDHC) at Santa Clara University in 2001, whose mission is to preserve the story and historical legacy of the beginnings of magnetic disk storage at 99 Notre Dame, San Jose, California (IEEE)
  • Hoff, Wallace - Worked in various Westinghouse groups, including the Advanced Technology Lab, Advanced Radar Development, Surveillance Radar Division and the Air Force Avionics Division. Projects he worked on include solid-state design, dead reckoning backpack system, radar projects, VHSIC, F-22/F-23, F-35, AWACS and SBIRS (IEEE)
  • Hofmann, H. Robert - spent his career at Bell Labs, serving as head of their EMC committee. In addition to his leadership in setting EMC standards and regulations, he served as president of IEEE’s EMC Society (IEEE)
  • Holditch, Stephen - Professor Emeritus of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University, held the Directorship of the Texas A&M Energy Institute, and was Head of the Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering, where he supervised research in the areas of unconventional gas reservoirs, well completions, well logging and well stimulation, and hydraulic fracturing. Dr. Holditch is a recognized expert in tight gas reservoirs, coalbed methane, shale gas reservoirs, and the design of hydraulic fracture treatments. He has authored or co-authored three books and more than fifty technical papers (SPE)
  • Hollerbach, John - IEEE Life Fellow, discusses his career in robotics, focusing on computer vision and artificial intelligence with a biological angle. Outlining his involvement with the artificial intelligence lab and the instigation of the Year of the Robot, he comments on the evolution and community acceptance of robotics as a serious scientific discipline (IEEE)
  • Hollis, Ralph - IEEE Life Fellow, spent the first part of his career in robotics research at IBM, and then moved to Carnegie Mellon University. His research has centered on haptics, agile precision assembly, and dynamically-stable mobile robots (IEEE)
  • Holloway, Beth - began her career in industry at Cummins Inc., where she progressed into the role of heat and fluids research and development engineering group leader. In 2001 she moved to academia, becoming the director of the Women in Engineering Program at Purdue University. She also serves as Purdue's Assistant Dean for Diversity and Engagement (SWE)
  • Holonyak, Nick - professor of engineering at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. He received a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1950 and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering, both from the University of Illinois. He was one of the first graduate students to work in John Bardeen's semiconductor laboratory when it began work in 1952. After completing his work at the University of Illinois, including two years in Bardeen's laboratory, Holonyak went on to work at Bell Laboratories with John Moll, where he and Moll made the first diffused silicon transistors and switches, metalecized silicon, and generally developed the technology behind the rise of Silicon Valley and today's chips. Before returning to the University of Illinois as a professor, Holonyak also served in the Army and worked at GE (IEEE)
  • Holst, Knud - From 1961 through 1972, Holst served as head of electronic development and then head of development at Bang & Olufsen, and he details projects he oversaw during this period. The interview covers Holst's work on transistor radios and stereo radios for Bang & Olufsen. He describes the influences of technology and design in development of the transistorized mains-operated receiver, and he analyzes the roles of the outside designers Bang & Olufsen hired, including Jacob Jensen. Engineers and designers collaborated on product development, working with components and materials. (IEEE)
  • Honaman, Karl - early leader in the dissemination of technical information, received a bachelor's degree in physics in 1916, and a masters degree in 1917 from Franklin and Marshall College. In 1917 he joined the Bureau of Standards, where he worked until 1919. Honaman then joined AT&T. When AT&T established Bell Telephone Laboratories in 1925, he moved there, where he remained until his retirement in 1960. During WWII, Honaman directed Bell Lab's School for War Training. After the war, Honaman became Director of Publications. During 1954 and 1955, he served both as a consultant to the US Secretary of Commerce and as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs (IEEE)
  • Hooks, Ivy - SWE Fellow, began her twenty-plus-years career as an aerospace engineer at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center and was an original space shuttle design team member. Hooks went on to hold a number of management positions, including Separation System Integration Manager and Manager of Flight Software Verification. While at NASA, she was the recipient of the Arthur S. Flemming Award for Outstanding Young Civil Servant, NASA Outstanding Speaker Award, and the NASA Medal. Hooks left NASA in 1984 and started her own software systems consulting firm, Compliance Automation, Inc. (SWE)
  • Hoolihan, Dan - A physicist by training, Hoolihan began his engineering career in EMC at Control Data. He is currently president of Hoolihan EMC Consulting and serves on the Board of Directors for the EMC Society. (IEEE)
  • Hooper, Don - began a two-year rotational program with Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G) in New Jersey. After completing the program, he decided to work with the distribution and transmission department improving and expanding the electrical power grid. Twenty years later he became involved with the National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) in 1969, updating and revising it every three to five years. He retired from PSEG in 1988 and started a consultancy; at the time of the interview Hooper continued to serve as chair of the NESC Interpretation Committee (IEEE)
  • Hornby, Sara - Her career includes R&D, applied R&D, new technology development, marketing, and knowledge exchange through networking with academia, colleagues, OEMs, students, and metallurgical plant operators. After beginning her steel industry career in the U.K. (Firth Brown Tools, BSC), she moved to North America, where she has predominantly offered operating practice innovations and process optimization solutions to steel mills from Air Liquide, Goodfellow Technologies, Midrex Technologies Inc., Linde Gases, Process Technology International (now INTECO PTI), TMS International and her own consulting company, Global Strategic Solutions Inc. (AIME)
  • Horne, Roland N. - Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering at Stanford University, and Director of the Stanford Geothermal Program. He was formerly the Chairman of the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford from 1995 to 2006. He is best known for his work in well test interpretation, production optimization, and tracer analysis of fractured reservoirs (SPE)
  • Hotz, Mel - Worked on Westinghouse field test equipment and electronic warfare and countermeasures and was involved in projects such as ALQ-119, ALQ-153 and DIDS (IEEE)
  • Howard, Ayanna - founder of Zyrobotics, a company that develops therapy and educational products for children with disabilities (IEEE)
  • Howard, Stanley M. - Research Fellow at Colorado School of Mines from 1967-1971. He moved to Rapid City in 1971 to teach at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, a career which lasted fifty years. He served as the chair of the Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering from 1994-2000. (AIME)
  • Huang, Thomas - arrived at MIT and completed his doctorate in 1963, working under Bill Schrieber. He was appointed to the faculty of MIT that same year. He remained at MIT until 1973, when he took a position as an electrical engineering professor and director of Information and Signal Processing Laboratory at Purdue University. In 1980 he was offered a chaired position in electrical engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and has remained there since. Career milestones include a major role in the development of transform coding in the late 1960s and in organization of the 1969 image coding conference at MIT (IEEE)
  • Hubing, Todd - IEEE Fellow, left a career in industry to pursue academic research in EMC. He taught at University Missouri Rolla, where he founded one of the first EMC research centers in the country. After seventeen years, he left UMR for Clemson University and was a former president of the EMC Society (IEEE)
  • Hull, Roger - worked for Leland Electric as a motor design engineer until 1937, then for NCR (National Cash Register Company) until he retired in 1972. First he worked on contact protection of speed control on cash registers and on the phone hookup from a cash register to a credit office to verify a charge account. During World War II he worked for Joe Desch’s project—on a primitive calculator involving thyratron tubes and on a counting board. After the war he returned to working on cash registers. He helped put induction motors in cash registers ca. 1960, worked on an adding machine that could print out a line of text when you pressed a single button, worked on portable battery-operated machines, a special machine for use in payrolls, and a Gerber Plotter, used for making masters for printed circuit boards (IEEE)
  • Humphry, Kathy - Humphry’s work in communications began as a telephone switching technician at Standards Telephones and Cable. She continued this work at Blue Cross/Blue Shield before teaching and providing technical support at Open University and the University of Edinburgh. She went on to work as a programmer at Xilinx (IEEE)
  • Hutchinson, C.A. - manager of ARCO’s South Texas District which encompasses the offshore area from about the Mississippi River down to the Rio Grande and onshore in some 40 Texas counties (SPE)
  • Hutchinson, Seth - longtime faculty member at the University of Illinois, has devoted much of his career to the intersection of computer vision and robotics (IEEE)
  • Hwang, Jennie - studied Chemistry at some of the best schools in Taiwan before continuing her higher education at Columbia University studying Chemistry and at Kent University studying the pioneering field of Liquid Crystal Science, before earning her Ph.D. at Case Western Reserve University’s Materials Science and Engineering School, becoming the first woman to do so. Hwang’s professional career included executive positions at both Lockheed Martin and Sherwood Williams, and serving as Engineering Advisor to the United States Defense Department’s Army Material Command. Her achievements included induction into the Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame and the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame. She was the first woman from Ohio and first Asian-American women to be elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the first national woman president of Surface Mount Technology Association (IEEE)

I

  • Impagliazzo, John - IEEE Life Fellow, Professor Emeritus of Computer Science, Hofstra University (Hempstead, NY, USA), author of Deterministic Aspects of Mathematical Demography: An Investigation of Stable Population Theory including an Analysis of the Population of Denmark (1985) and he co-authored the English edition of The Legacy of John Von Neumann (1990). He also co-authored numerous computing and mathematics textbooks, including Computer Science: A Breadth-First Approach with C (1995); Computer Science: A Breath-First Approach with Pascal (1995); Mathematics: Back to Basics (1978); and Precalculus: A Functional Approach with Applications (1977). (IEEE)
  • Imomoh, Egbert U. - Joined Shell in 1968 as a petroleum engineer in Nigeria. He then embarked on a thirty-seven-year career with the company, eventually transitioning from technical positions to management. Imomoh joined SPE in 1973 and was a founding member of the section in Nigeria. He was chairman of the SPE Nigeria Council in 1986 and was named a Distinguished Member of the society in 1999. (AIME)
  • Inoue, Hirochika - professor Emeritus at the University of Tokyo. He has had a varied career in robotics, including extensive work on humanoid robots (IEEE)
  • Ireland, Eleanor - During WWII, Ireland joined the Women’s Royal Naval Service and was stationed at Bletchley Park, where she operated the Colossus computers as part of an elite, top-secret codebreaking team (IEEE)
  • Isaak, James - member of the IEEE Computer Society since 1971. He led the POSIX standards effort from 1984 through 1994, as work expanded to 30 projects with involvement by over 500 volunteers (IEEE)
  • Ishiguro, Hiroshi - worked in computer vision, and in interactive and intelligent robotics (IEEE)
  • Itakura, Fumitada - worked as a Resident Visitor in the Acoustics Research Department of Bell Labs under James Flanagan from 1973 to 1975. Between 1975 and 1981, he researched problems in speech analysis and synthesis based on the Line Spectrum Pair [LSP] method. In 1981, he was appointed as Chief of the Speech and Acoustics Research Section at NTT. He left this position in 1984 to take a professorship in communications theory and signal processing at Nagoya University. His major contributions include theoretical advances involving the application of time static stochastic process, linear prediction, and maximum likelihood classification to speech recognition. He patented the PARCOR vocoder in 1969 and helped to design Fujitsu's speech recognition chip in the early 1980s (IEEE)
  • Iwasa, Yukikazu - earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees at MIT. He has spent his entire career at the Francis Bitter Magnet Lab at MIT, where his work has focused on the study, development, and design of superconducting magnets (IEEE)
  • Izawa, Tatsuo - pioneer in the field of optical devices and components for communication systems. He invented the electro-migration method for the fabrication of planar lightwave circuits and the Vapor-phase Axial Deposition (VAD) method of optical fiber fabrication. He also conducted pioneering work on silica-based planar lightwave circuits. Izawa has spent the majority of his career as a researcher and manager at the Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT). (IEEE)

J

  • Jacobs, Irwin - Marconi Fellow, IEEE Life Fellow, and Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, co-founded the Linkabit consulting company and Qualcomm (IEEE)
  • James, Joan Leamy - Secretary for Dr. Britton Chance at the MIT Rad Lab (IEEE)
  • Jaron, Dov - Biomedical Engineer who was a President of the IEEE EMBS and co-developed the intra-aortic balloon pump (IEEE)
  • Jarvis, Ray - IEEE Life Fellow, divided his career between the Australian National University and Monash University. His research spanned a wide range of topics in robotics, including computer vision, intelligent robots, path and pattern recognition and planning, and image processing (IEEE)
  • Jedenoff, George A. - During World War II he was a commissioned officer in the US Navy reserve and served overseas in the Pacific, mostly on Guam. After the war he was hired as an industrial engineer with the Columbia steel company in Pittsburg, California. Columbia was a subsidiary of U.S. Steel and was undergoing a major expansion and modernization. He was assigned as a supervisor in operations and progressed rapidly from foreman to the position of general superintendent of the plant. In 1967 he was promoted to head U.S. Steel’s largest steel plant, Gary Steelworks. Two years later he was promoted to general manager over six plants, and a year later to VP operations (West) over 10 steel plants. He was located at the US steel headquarters in Pittsburgh, PA. In 1971 he was named president of USS Engineers and Consultants, a subsidiary of USS, with worldwide responsibility (AIME)
  • Jenniches, F. Suzanne (2003) - Over a 36 year career at Westinghouse and its successor Northrup-Grumman, Jenniches worked on a wide range of projects, ranging from highly defense classified work an automated sorting system for the U.S. Postal Service. She retired from Baltimore in 2010 as Vice President and General Manager (SWE)
  • Jenniches, F. Suzanne (2010 - IEEE) (IEEE)
  • Jenniches, F. Suzanne (2010 - SWE) (IEEE)
  • Jensen, Jacob - opened his own studio, Jacob Jensen Design, in 1958. Clients' familiarity with Jensen's work for Bernadotte and Bjørn led to the JJD studio's early design projects. Simultaneously, Jensen worked on hi-fi product design and operated the European branch for Latham, Tyler & Jensen, a design firm with which he had worked in the U.S. In 1964 Jensen continued his work in hi-fi design for Bang & Olufsen, leading to the Beomaster 5000 tuner and amplifier product marketed in 1967 (IEEE)
  • Jetter, Alexis - teaches at Dartmouth College, and is in the process of writing a memoir about her mother, Evelyn Jetter. Evelyn received an engineering degree from The Cooper Union in 1950 and, early in her career, she studied radiation exposure at the Atomic Energy Commission. She temporarily left the workforce in 1953 to raise a family, but soon began working in her basement as a consulting engineering and physicist for Newark Controls, an engineering company owned by fellow Society of Women Engineers member Beatrice Hicks (SWE)
  • Joel, Amos (1992) - In 1940, Joel went to work at Bell Labs, and over his long career there he worked in many areas and projects, such as the accounting center, operator services, transistors, electronic switching system at Whippany, Stored Program Control, No. 1 ESS and Traffic Service Positions System (TSPS) to name a few, as well as becoming a director (IEEE)
  • Joel, Amos (1993) (IEEE)
  • Joenk, Rudy - received his PhD in 1962 from the University of Pittsburgh and started in the same year working at the IBM's T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. Six years later, he became an Associate Editor for the IBM Journal of Research and Development and in 1971 an Editor. (IEEE)
  • Joffe, Elya - first Israeli president of the EMC Society, Joffe began his long career in defense consulting as a soldier in the IDF. His training in EMC engineering has taken him across the globe, from working with Voice of America to Lockheed Martin and back. This experience fed back into his career as president, characterized by his efforts to globalize EMC Society (IEEE)
  • Johns, Richard J. - Spent his career at Johns Hopkins, where he became the first Director of the Biomedical Engineering as a separate department at Hopkins in 1970 (IEEE)
  • Johnson, Barbara Crawford - SWE Fellow, a woman pioneer in the defining years of the U.S. missile and space program. She graduated in 1946 as the first woman graduate in general engineering from the University of Illinois and immediately began work in aerospace engineering. She worked for 36 years at Rockwell International Space Division, making significant contributions to four of the nation's most prominent systems and technology ventures, including the Navaho missile, the Hound Dog air-to-ground guided missile, the Apollo Lunar Landing Program, and the Space Shuttle program (SWE)
  • Johnson, Barry - 1997 IEEE Computer Society President, served as Senior Associate Dean and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. He is founder and director of the University of Virginia Center for Safety-Critical Systems. In 1998, he was a founder of Privaris, Inc., a biometric security company (IEEE)
  • Johnston, Lawrence - Worked for Luis Alvarez in the MIT Rad Lab as a project engineer for the blind-landing GCA project (IEEE)
  • Joklik, G. Frank - President and Chief Executive Officer of Kennecott Corporation, began his career with Kennecott in 1953 as an exploration geologist. and headed up minerals projects in Canada and the U.S., based first in Quebec and then at Kennecott's headquarters in New York City (AIME)
  • Jones, Karen Spärck - Spärck Jones’ started her prolific research career in natural language processing and information retrieval at Cambridge University. She invented inverse document frequency weighting, a technique used in online search engines today. A leader in the field, she served as president of the Association for Computational Linguistics in 1994 (IEEE)
  • Jones, William - Worked on Westinghouse projects such as AWACS, Overland Radar Technology, and phased array. He later became Electronic Warfare General Manager and headed parts of the commercial division (IEEE)
  • Jorden, Jim (2015) - manager of petroleum engineering research at Shell Development Company, he held over 40 SPE-wide positions on both technical and administrative committees (SPE)
  • Jorden, Jim (2022) (AIME)
  • Joshi, Ravindra - Ravindra Joshi earned an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from IIT and an MBA from Lancaster University, UK. He has more than forty years of large corporate experience. He is with Tata Power Delhi Distribution Limited as Head of Department of Special Consumer Group. He has served as Treasurer & Chair-Human Technology Challenge Standing Committee of IEEE-Delhi Section Executive Committee, IEEE Delhi Section Execom Chair, and on the IEEE Delhi Section SIGHT Standing Committee. He has also been an active member of the IEEE Power and Energy Society. (IEEE)
  • Judah, Janeen - 2017 President of the Society of Petroleum Engineers International, General Manager of Chevron’s Southern Africa business. Other Chevron positions include President of the Chevron Environmental Management Company and GM of Reservoir and Production Engineering for Chevron Energy Technology Company (SPE)

K

  • Kahn, Hilary - Kahn’s introduction to computing began with the KDF 9 and ALGOL computers. She worked as a researcher in the Computer Science department at Manchester University, engaged in computer-aided design and software engineering projects like COBOL and the MU5 computer system (IEEE)
  • Kahn, Robert - Marconi Fellow and an IEEE Life Fellow, played an instrumental role in the creation of the Internet, from the creation of ARPANET through ARPANET's transformation into the Internet (IEEE)
  • Kailath, Thomas - IEEE Fellow, from 1961 to 1962 he worked at JPL in Pasadena, California, and concurrently taught part-time at California Institute of Technology. From 1963 to the present he has been a professor in the EE department at Stanford University. He was involved in the development of Stanford's Information Systems Laboratory from 1971 to 1981. In 1981, Kailath became a co-founder of Integrated Systems, Inc., a small company specializing in the development and licensing of high-level CAE (Computer-Aided Engineering) software and hardware products for the analysis, design and implementation of control systems in a variety of applications (IEEE)
  • Kaiser, James - IEEE Fellow, In the Bell Labs Research Department Dr. Kaiser worked on projects such as acoustic concentration with microphones, improving speech signal processing systems, developing filter design algorithms, and spectral window research. His focus was on filter design, particularly in those which would convert analog data to digital for various communications purposes. In the 1980s, he concentrated on nonlinear approaches to filter design. When the Bell System broke up in 1984, he moved to Bellcore, the newly established research operation owned jointly by the divested local Bell telephone companies (IEEE)
  • Kaleda, Laurel - served as the 1994 president of the Computer Society. She attended Washington University, St. Louis, where she graduated in 1966 from the newly formed Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science. She worked as an engineer and manager at IBM in programming assurance, mainframe disk storage, and intellectual property at San Jose, Menlo Park, and Santa Teresa. At the Computer Society, she provided leadership in standards and as VP-Technical Activities (IEEE)
  • Kalow, Samuel - Kalow married Charles Peirce’s daughter, worked with Peirce from 1956 to 1959, and learned most of the Peirce company history from his father-in-law. Peirce bought Radiotechnic Laboratories in 1938, turned it into Peirce Wire Recorder Corporation, and developed the airborne wire recorder to sell to the air force during World War II (and a successor machine with a cartridge/cassette during the Korean War). After the war he converted these into a commercial magnetic recording machine. He introduced a magnetic belt to his machine, made them transistorized and portable, and changed the name of the company to Peirce Dictation Systems in 1955. In 1959 he sold out the company to IBM, which then used his technology as the basis for their own line of dictation machines. Peirce was a consultant for IBM for two years, then retired. Kalow then transferred to IBM as a salesman and manager, where he made his ensuing career. His final comment is that dictation machines are a marginal industry, only useful to a small fraction of people. (IEEE)
  • Kaneko, Makoto - IEEE Life Fellow, outlines his career in robotics and his contributions to various projects, such as the walking robot and the multi-fingered hand. He discusses his experiments with the hand, the impact of his work, the future direction of his research, and future applications of robotics (IEEE)
  • Kang, In-Ku - taught at the Korean Naval Academy for a few years before continuing his education in the United States at the University of New Mexico where he earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering in 1967. In the early 1970s, Kang helped to start an electrical engineering department at the Osan Institute of Technology (later Osan University), then he was drafted into the Agency for Defense Development (ADD) in 1973. Kang retired from the Korean Navy in 1979 and left ADD in 1980, beginning his career at GoldStar (now LG). He stayed at LG for fifteen years, during which time he was involved in the PBX switching system, MRI (for which he received the 1984 Presidential Award in Electronic System Development), semiconductors, and LCD development in the early 1990s (IEEE)
  • Kang, Jin Ku - began employment with the Korea Institute of Science and Technology, where his projects included calculator and electronic switching system development. KIST and Samsung joined to form Samsung-GTE Telecommunications for electronic switching equipment production, and the KIST switching project transferred to the new Samsung-GTE. From 1977 through 1980, Kang continued switching work at Samsung-GTE. From 1980 to 1982, Kang worked at Korea Electric Telecom, or Tetri, a predecessor to Etri. At this new company, created through governmental support, Kang worked on public switching system development and on software development, directing the switching system software development laboratory. In 1982, Kang worked at Trigent Computer; a private company manufacturing PCs; beginning in 1983 he worked at the new Trigent Microsystems computer workstation company (IEEE)
  • Kang, Ki Dong - While at Ohio State, Kang was asked to take part in the new semiconductor lab working on device fabrication and diffusion, influencing Kang’s later work in the semiconductor industry. After graduating, Kang joined Motorola in 1962 in the semiconductor division, and he was unofficially part of opening a Korean assembly operation for Motorola. Kang then worked for Stuart Warner Corporation, where he contributed to the assembly operation, helped set-up a plant in Taiwan, and had projects like the seat-belt interlock system. While at Stuart Warner, Kang became interested in starting his own semiconductor operation, eventually starting Integrated Circuit International, Incorporated (ICII) making watch chips. Kang eventually sold ICII to Samsung and was employed by the company a few years before leaving Samsung and the semiconductor industry (IEEE)
  • Kang, Sung Mo (Steve) - began attending Yonsei University in electrical engineering, coming to the United States in his senior year to attend Fairleigh Dickinson University, a sister school of Yonsei. He received his masters at SUNY Buffalo, and attended Berkeley for his doctorate working on memristive systems, finishing in 1975. After graduating, Kang taught for two years at Rutgers University before going to work at Bell Labs in 1977. Involved in microprocessor development, Kang stayed at Bell Labs until 1985, when he moved back into academia at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, eventually becoming department chair. In 2001, Kang went to UC Santa Cruz as Dean of Engineering, and began serving as Chancellor at UC Merced in 2007. Kang also joined the IEEE in 1972, and has been editor-in-chief of a journal and society president (IEEE)
  • Kant, Milton - worked as an engineer for the Air Force before beginning a career in industry. He is a cofounder of the IRE Professional Group on Radio Interference (IEEE)
  • Kao, Charles - A pioneer in the development of fiber optics for telecommunications and a winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics (IEEE)
  • Kaplan, Frederic - spent his career in robotics, starting from his job at Sony to his position at EPFL and made contributions to various robotics projects, including the Sony AIBO robot (IEEE)
  • Kapor, Mitchell - founder of Lotus Development Corporation and the designer of Lotus 1-2-3, as well as an entrepreneur, philanthropist, social activist, and investor. He founded Lotus in 1982, served as President (later Chairman) and Chief Executive Officer from 1982 to 1986, and as Director until 1987. He also served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ON Technology from 1987 to 1990 (IEEE)
  • Karger, Gunther - Gunther Karger was born on 16 March 1933 in Schmieheim, Germany. In 1939, his parents sent him on a transport of children to Sweden to escape from Nazi Germany. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust and after World War II he was sent to the United States. After graduating high school as valedictorian, he enlisted in the United States Air Force, where he worked on radar systems. After leaving the Air Force, he enrolled in Louisiana State University, where he graduated in 1958. Karger held positions at Boeing, Bell Labs, and Eastern Airlines, and was involved with IEEE in several volunteer positions, including editor for the IEEE Communications Society Newsletter, member of the Executive Committee of the IEEE North Jersey Section, and chair of the IEEE Canaveral Section. (IEEE)
  • Karmis, Michael - Stonie Barker Professor of the Department of Mining and Minerals Engineering and the Director of the Virginia Center for Coal and Energy Research at Virginia Tech. His broad research interests are in mine planning and design, ground control and the sustainable development of energy and natural resources. He has authored more than 150 scientific papers, reports, Proceeding’s volumes and textbooks and has directed numerous research projects funded by government agencies and the private sector. A Professional Engineer in the U.S.A. and a Licensed Engineer (Eur Ing) in Europe, Dr. Karmis has been active in consulting with the minerals industry, consulting companies, government organizations and legal firms. He served as the 2002 President of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) and the 2002/03 President of the Society of Mining Professors (AIME)
  • Karplus, Walter - Applied his work using computers to solve partial differential equations to many different areas. He has served as computer science department chair and interim dean at UCLA (IEEE)
  • Kasturi, Rangachar - joined the Pennsylvania State University in 1982. A few years later President Emeritus Tse Yun Feng, who was heading its Computer Engineering program, introduced him to the IEEE Computer Society and its volunteer service opportunities. For more than 30 years, Kasturi has served in many significant roles at IEEE CS including editor in chief of IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, Vice President of various boards (Publications, Conferences, Membership, and Geographic Activities), Treasurer, Board of Governors member and its chair, and President (IEEE)
  • Kataoka, Katsutaro - Kataoka graduated from Kobe University in the 1930’s and joined the Toshiba Corporation. After a short time with Toshiba, Kataoka entered the Japanese military. In 1943 he returned to Toshiba, but left again in 1945 to start his own company, Alps Electric. (IEEE)
  • Katehi, Linda - IEEE Life Fellow “for contributions to phased array packaging and high-frequency characterization of novel feeding networks for printed antennas and arrays.”. She taught electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, rising from Assistant Professor to Professor and later an Associate Dean (1984-2002). She then spent four years as Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at Purdue University (2002-2006); three years as Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (2006-2009); and seven years as Chancellor and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, 2009-2016. In 2016, Katehi resigned as Chancellor, but remained on faculty at the University of California, Davis, and since 2019, she has been Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University. (IEEE)
  • Katz, J. Lawrence - Applied crystal physics to biological studies and was one of the founders of the Biomedical Engineering Society (IEEE)
  • Kavraki, Lydia - Noah Harding professor of computer science at Rice University in Houston (IEEE)
  • Kawamura, Sadao - Proposed and helped establish Ritsumeikan University’s Department of Robotics, the first department of robotics in the world. He has been a professor at this department since 1996 and a director of Ritsumeikan University’s Robotics Research Center since 2011. He served as president of the Robotics Society of Japan from 2011 to 2013 (IEEE)
  • Kayton, Myron - spent much of his career working for TRW, NASA, and Litton, followed by running his own practice for 18 years. In his career he is most proud of his work on lunar modular electronics, shuttle electronics, and military cruise missiles. In the 1970s he had significant involvement in the Aerospace Society of the IEEE. He found the IEEE useful in his career as a way of meeting colleagues worldwide, and as a convenient place to publish research and reduce duplicated effort. He discusses what he thinks will be the future of guidance and navigation systems, predicting the spread of for-profit GPS systems, the spread of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), and the replacement of Very High-Frequency Omni-Ranges (VOHR), which currently control the airways, by GPS systems. (IEEE)
  • Keller, Arthur C. - spent his entire career with the Bell System, beginning with his first job in 1918 as a laboratory assistant for the Western Electric Company. While employed, Keller completed his education, graduating from Cooper Union in 1923. He then went on to do graduate work at Yale and Columbia. Keller's early work at Bell Laboratories was in sound recording and reproduction, under the direction of Henry Harrison. Keller held many patents related to his work in sound recording, including one in the late 1930s which covered the basic principles of stereophonic recording. During WWII, he was involved in the development of four major sonar systems for the US Navy. After the war, he continued his work with Bell Laboratories, which included the development of the wire spring relay and solderless wire wrapping (IEEE)
  • Keller, Laurie - Before becoming the first woman lecturer in computing at Open University, Keller worked as a programmer for Electronic Data Systems, TRW, Iraq Petroleum, Texas Instruments, and Continental Airlines (IEEE)
  • Kern, Jack - started his first job as an errand boy in the Engineering Model Shop at the National Cash Register Company. He took interest in and built experience in electricity, enabling him to move from the Engineering Department to the Research Department in late 1940. Kern worked on the development of off-on tubes and ran the Tube Lab at NCR. In 1947, he developed the first prototype of a printed circuit. While working at NCR, Kern pursued higher education by attending the University of Dayton, Ohio, at night. During World War II, he made an electronic counter for Aberdeen Proving Grounds and participated in the Bombe project, ULTRA, a secret Navy project. Under strict security, Kern and others relocated to Building 26 to carry out this project. There, Kern took care of various duties, including commutator testing and tape punch assembly (IEEE)
  • Kesselman, Warren A. - spent his career as an engineer for the Army at Fort Monmouth, where he was Chief of the COMSEC Division, head of the EMC team, and deputy director of the Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate (IEEE)
  • Khatib, Oussama - IEEE Life Fellow, discusses his career in robotics, focusing on robot control and motion planning. Describing his work and research, he outlines his time at Stanford University and his involvement in several robotics projects, including the Stanford Robotics Platforms—Romeo and Juliet. Discussing the evolution and challenges of his work, he describes his move towards humanoid robotics and his involvement with robotics societies and activities. He also provides career advice for young people interested in robotics (IEEE)
  • Khosla, Pradeep - spent his career in robotics, focusing on manipulation and control, worked at Carnegie Mellon University and DARPA on projects like the SCARA design and the direct-drive arm, the reconfigurable modular manipulator system, swarm robotics, and warfare robotics (IEEE)
  • Kiesler, Sara - worked on anthropomorphic robots, human-robot interaction, cognitive and social design, and projects such as Pearl and organizing and developing the HRI conferences. (IEEE)
  • Kihara, Nobutoshi - A mechanical engineer employed by Sony. He is best known for his development of video tape recording technology (IEEE)
  • Kikuchi, Makoto - A researcher in semiconductor physics and electronics who served as the Director of Sony’s Research Center. (IEEE)
  • Kilby, Jack - best known as the co-inventor of the integrated circuit. He conceived and built the first integrated circuit at Texas Instruments in 1958, simultaneously with Robert Noyce's independent integrated circuit work at Fairchild in California. Kilby then built the first computer using integrated circuits at Texas Instruments in 1961. Six years later he and two co-workers invented the first pocket calculator to show how useful integrated circuits would be in daily life, not just powerful government or military applications (IEEE)
  • Kilgore, Lee - While attending the University of Nebraska's engineering school, he took summer jobs that eventually led him to work at Westinghouse. He spent his career working on various technologies used in power generation, including generators and switchgear, as well as motors for wind tunnels (IEEE)
  • Kim, Jae Kyoon - graduated from the National Aviation College in Seoul in 1961 and received a Master’s degree from Seoul National University. He studied in the United States at the University of Southern California from 1967 to 1971 and subsequently worked at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland for one year. In 1973, he returned to Korea to be an assistant professor at KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology), where he would spend the next few decades. KAIST was founded with government funding and was initially staffed with Korean engineering and science talents who, like Kim, were educated in the United States. From the onset, the emphasis was in theoretical as well as applied research. KAIST became Korea’s foremost center of strategic R&D projects. The University helped pioneer the establishment of competitive graduate school programs in Korea (IEEE)
  • Kim, Yong Sun - After studying telecommunications engineering at Seoul National University, Yong Sun Kim worked for the Ministry of Communications, Korea Telecom, and Gold Star. At the time of this interview, he worked for the LG (Lucky-Gold Star) Academy, the company's training group, having served for seven years as this Academy's president. (IEEE)
  • Kind, Dieter - IEEE Fellow, began his engineering study at the technical university in Berlin and finished his engineering diploma at the Munich Technical University. In 1957 he received his doctorate in electrical engineering from the Technical of Munich. Kind's research focused on high voltage engineering, particularly the electric strengths of various gases and the breakdown for voltage discharge. After earning his doctorate, he went to work in the high voltage field, designing test and instrument transformers for safe conduction of electric power. He later joined the Braunschweig Technical University for High Voltage Technique and in 1975 became President of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt national technical research institute in Braunschweig (IEEE)
  • King, Alex - Director of the Critical Materials Institute at the Ames Laboratory since 2013, where he oversees innovation in the processing and recycling of rare-earth minerals, the development of substitute materials for these elements, and economic analysis of their global supply. He was previously the Director of the Ames Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), head of the School of Materials Engineering at Purdue University, and professor of materials science at SUNY Stony Brook (AIME)
  • King, Archie - the son of Alsatian immigrants, had only a year of high school education when he entered Cal Tech. He graduated in 1927. After working at the Mt. Wilson Observatory, King took a position with Bell Telephone Laboratories in 1930, where he remained until his retirement in 1961. After retiring, King returned to California and worked for several years for the Hughes Aircraft Company (IEEE)
  • King, John - W.W. Bishop Professor at the University of Michigan School of Information. For many years prior, he had served as a faculty member and administrator in the information school at the University of California Irvine. He held both faculty and administrative roles at Michigan in both the School of Information and the university central administration. His main research deals with computerization in the public sector and municipalities, as well as other organizations. He has also worked on privacy issues and some of the primary computerization projects (IEEE)
  • King, Willis - 2002 IEEE Computer Society President, worked at the IBM Laboratorien, Germany, in 1963 and 1964. He has been a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Houston since 1969 and served as its chair from 1979 to 1992. He is a professor emeritus of the University of Houston and a fellow of the IEEE and the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board (CSAB). (IEEE)
  • Kipilo, Margaret - graduated from Pennsylvania State College during World War II and went to work for Westinghouse Electric Corporation as an Assistant Engineer in Systems Studies. She later worked for the Pennsylvania Electric Company and as a substitute teacher. Kipilo was an early member and Fellow of the Society of Women Engineers and was long active in IEEE (SWE)
  • Kirby, Richard - interrupted his college studies of electrical engineering at the University of Minnesota to join the Army Signal Corps during World War II. In service he worked to improve the reliability of Army High Frequency. Returning to the US, he worked for a broadcasting corporation in Missouri (1946-48), and spent the next two decades excluding another year at the University of Minnesota, 1950-51) at the National Bureau of Standards, largely at the Central Radio Propagation Laboratory. His research focused on Very High Frequency (VHF) scatter propagation. He was heavily involved in international standards-setting through the Comité Consultatif International des Radiocommunications (CCIR) and the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), working to set standards for color television, high definition television, advanced mobile systems, and 3G mobile. He also was significantly involved in various IRE and IEEE communications group activities. In 1969 he became director of the Institute for Telecommunication Science. From 1974 to 1994 he went to Geneva to work as director of ITU’s CCIR (IEEE)
  • Kircher, Mary - An early pioneer of women in computing, Kircher spent her programming career at Los Alamos, where she worked on Marchant calculators, MANIAC, FORTRAN, BASIC, and Hewlett-Packard languages (IEEE)
  • Kjaer, Viggo - studied electronics under Peder O. Pedersen and Jens Nielsen at the Technical University in Copenhagen. After completing his degree in 1939, Kjær designed receivers for companies manufacturing radios. In 1942 Kjær formed the Brüel & Kjær instrumentation company with his University colleague Per Brüel. Beginning in 1944, Kjær focused on this company full time, taking on management and design roles (IEEE)
  • Klafter, Richard - IEEE Life Fellow, President of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society from 1994-1995, co-author of the early robotics textbook, Robotic Engineering: An Integrated Approach, and longtime professor at Drexel University and Temple University (IEEE)
  • Kleinrock, Leonard - Marconi Fellow and an IEEE Life Fellow, played an important role in the development of ARPANET and of packet switching theory. Recipient of the 2007 National Medal of Science (IEEE)
  • Kline, Ron - briefly attended the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in the computer science program, but then pursued his interest in history at the University of Wisconsin’s program in History of Science in 1977, studying the history of electrical engineering. After getting his Ph.D., Kline taught one year of technical writing at Wisconsin before becoming director of the Center for the History of Electrical Engineering (now the IEEE History Center) in 1984. During his time at the center, Kline also taught at Cooper Union and researched the life of Charles Proteus Steinmetz. In the late 1980s, Kline left the center for a position at Cornell University in the electrical engineering school teaching the history of technology, and he runs the Bovay Program in History and Ethics of Engineering. Kline also became active in the Society on Social Implications of Technology (SSIT) while at Cornell, and he served as the society’s president (1991-1992) and editor of its magazine (IEEE)
  • Knight, C. Raymond - demonstrated an early interest in engineering, building crystal radio sets and tube operated short-wave receivers in high school. Although physics appealed to him, he pursued a degree in electrical engineering on the advice of his brother-in-law. (He would later return to school to complete a master’s degree in physics.) In addition to Knight’s advancement of the practical development of tube applications, particularly with regard to problems of reliability, he made significant theoretical contributions to the literature on the subject (IEEE)
  • Kobayashi, Koji - synonymous with the acronym C&C, or Control and Communication, in the computing, electronics, and telecommunications industries. Upon his graduation from Tokyo Imperial University in 1929, Kobayashi joined the Nippon Electric Company (NEC), a Japanese subsidiary of the Western Electric Company. Koji Kobayashi’s long career with NEC spanned various roles within the company: head of the Tamagawa Plant in 1946; Director of NEC in 1949; Senior Vice President in 1956; Executive Vice President in 1961; Senior Executive Vice President in 1962; President in 1964 and Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer in 1976. Dr. Kobayashi received his Doctor of Engineering from the Tokyo University in 1939, and continued to amass various honorary doctorate degrees and awards throughout his lifetime (IEEE)
  • Koch, Richard - engineer at Regency Electronics who headed the design of the first transistorized radio, the TR-1, introduced in 1954 (IEEE)
  • Koditschek, Daniel - IEEE Life Fellow, Chair of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, in which he currently serves as the Alfred Fitler Moore Professor (IEEE)
  • Kogel, Jessica E. - Associate Director for Mining and the Director of the Office of Mine Safety and Health Research at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). At NIOSH she leads the institute’s mining research program which focuses on improving mine worker health and safety through the development and implementation of innovative engineering controls, novel monitoring approaches, and improved work practices. Before joining NIOSH, Dr. Kogel spent 25-years working in the mining industry where she held positions in research and development and mining operations management for two global producers of industrial minerals (AIME)
  • Kogelnik, Herwig - Marconi Fellow and an IEEE Life Fellow, made important contributions to laser technologies, including the invention of the distributed feedback laser (IEEE)
  • Kokotovic, Petar (1995) - Native of Belgrade and an IEEE Life fellow, studied widely in both Eastern and Western Europe before joining the faculty at the University of Illinois where in the 1960s he developed the sensitivity points method for the automatic tuning of industrial controllers (IEEE)
  • Kokotovic, Petar (2011) (IEEE)
  • Kosecka, Jana - on the faculty at George Mason University, author of "An Invitation to 3-D Vision: From Images to Geometric Models," and recipient of the Marr Prize and a National Science Foundation CAREER Award (IEEE)
  • Kosuge, Kazuhiro - IEEE Life Fellow, is a professor in the department of robotics at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan, and works on the Dancer Robot Project (IEEE)
  • Kraft, Donald - IEEE Life Fellow and is professor emeritus, at Louisiana State University and his research, teaching, and publishing career has focused on bringing techniques from operations research, fuzzy logic, and genetic algorithms to information retrieval (IEEE)
  • Kragic, Danica - on the faculty at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), in Sweden (IEEE)
  • Krener, Arthur - IEEE Life Fellow, received a Ph.D. in Mathematics in 1971 from the University of California, Berkeley and spent his career on the faculty of the University of California, Davis. He was recipient of the 2006 IEEE Control System Society Bode Prize Lecture “for fundamental contributions to the foundations of geometric nonlinear control theory”. (IEEE)
  • Kressel, Henry - IEEE Life Fellow, RCA vice president of solid-state electronic research and development (IEEE)
  • Kretz, Hans - studied in Vienna, where he built cybernetic models that demonstrated conditioned learning. Employed by Philips Austria, he first developed transistorized TVs before becoming the chief manager of the applications laboratory. In the interview, he discusses the landmarks in Austrian electronic progress, in particular the move to transistors and then to integrated circuits. He cites a number of Austrian inventions, including an avalanche detection device and a hearing aid. He also discusses the advent of automation in producing components, the transition from tubes to transistors at Philips, the development of microprocessors and the evolution of passive components. He ends with the mention of an inexpensive laser diode invented at Philips Austria that became part of their laser-disc players (IEEE)
  • Krim, Norman B. - a 1934 MIT graduate in electrical engineering, was influential in the development of transistor radio technologies. During a lengthy career at Raytheon, Krim oversaw tubes and semiconductors, served as Vice President, and performed as Raytheon corporate archivist. Krim was also president of Radio Shack from 1961 to 1963 and served as president of the Joseph Pollak Corporation before his retirement (IEEE)
  • Kroemer, Herbert - 2000 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics, worked at house physicist at Central Communications Lab, where he got the idea for heterostructure bipolar transistors. After spending three years at RCA labs, he returned to Germany to head Phillips Semiconductor Group, working on gallium arsenide technology in 1957. Returning to the United States, he worked at Varian Associates, and studied the Gunn effect. In 1968 went to University of Colorado, and in 1975 to University of California Santa Barbara (IEEE)
  • Kuchuk, Fikri - Schlumberger Fellow, is currently Chief Reservoir Engineer for Schlumberger Testing Services. Dr. Kuchuk has 40 years of experience in reservoir characterization, engineering, and management, and is an internationally-recognized expert on pressure transient formation and well testing. He has made significant contributions to the theory and technology in the areas of formation and well testing interpretation ; history matching ; and uncertainty in reservoir description and reservoir performance predictions. He has published and presented more than 150 technical papers on fluid flow in porous media; formation evaluation; pressure transient well testing; production logging; wireline formation testers; horizontal and multilateral well placement and performance; permanent reservoir monitoring; water conformance and control; and reservoir engineering and management (SPE)
  • Kuck, David - Developed the Parafrase compiler system, led the construction of the CEDAR project and made contributions to the design of parallel computing and memory (IEEE)
  • Kumar, Anurag - IEEE Life Fellow, Director emeritus of the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru, co-author of Wireless Networking (2008) with D. Manjunath and Joy Kuri; and co-edited Communication Networking: An Analytical Approach (2004) (IEEE)
  • Kumar, Vijay - Founder of Exyn Technologies, a company that develops solutions for autonomous flight and Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering (with appointments) with the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, the Department of Computer and Information Science, and the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania (IEEE)
  • Kunasz, Ihor A. - started his lithium career with a doctoral thesis at the Pennsylvania State University on the Origin of Lithium in the Clayton Valley, where Foote Mineral produced the very first lithium carbonate from brine. He then joined Foote Mineral Company, where he was responsible for the spodumene and brine operations. While at Foote, evaluated most lithium deposits globally, including the brines of Argentina, Bolivia, and China. He brought to the project development stage the two lowest-cost lithium reserves in the world - Silver Peak, Nevada, U.S.A., and the Salar de Atacama, Chile. At Silver Peak, he was responsible for identifying production targets, and he developed a hydrological model for the basin, which is still valid today. At the Salar de Atacama, in addition to defining the lithium reserves, his discovery of calcium-rich brines resulted in a new brine process, which replaced costly lime addition (AIME)
  • Kuo, Chung-Chieh Jay - joined the University of Southern California (USC) in January 1989. He is Director of the Multimedia Communication Laboratory, Holder of the William H. Hogue Professorship in Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Distinguished Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science at USC (IEEE)
  • Kyhl, Robert - Worked in the MIT Rad Lab magnetron group and the test equipment group (IEEE)
  • Kyotani, Yoshihiro - An engineer who worked on Japanese National Railroad, including in the development of the Bullet Train (IEEE)

L

  • Labuda, Edward F. - joined AT&T Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ, in June of 1959. After a 35 year career, he retired from AT&T as Vice President, AT&T Microelectronics and Chief Operating Officer of the Photonics Business Unit. His business unit responsibilities included marketing, product planning, finance, research and development operations in Breinigsville, PA, and Murray Hill, NJ, and manufacturing operations in Reading, PA, and Clark, NJ, a sub-cable repeater assembly plant (IEEE)
  • Lake, Larry - chair of the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering and director of the Enhanced Oil Recovery Research Program at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a specialist in reservoir engineering and geochemistry, specifically focusing on enhanced oil recovery and reservoir characterization. Dr. Lake’s work in quantifying the effects of geochemical interactions and flow variability for resource recovery is now widely applied by industry. His reservoir characterization work includes demonstrating that different geological depositional processes produce flow properties that can be statistically described. He was also among the first to recognize the importance of rock-fluid chemical interactions on enhanced oil recovery, and his work has been crucial in developing more efficient methods for recovering oil and gas from reservoirs (SPE)
  • Laker, Ken - 1999 IEEE President, IEEE Life Fellow, and Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, spent his career as chair and faculty member of the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a leading expert on microelectronic filters. As IEEE President, he led IEEE in embracing the internet, through IEEE Xplore for electronic publishing, an improved website, and the IEEE Virtual Museum (IEEE)
  • Land, Susan (Kathy) - 2021 IEEE President, Program Manager for the U.S. Department of Defense’s Missile Defense Agency (IEEE)
  • Lang, William - IEEE Fellow, joined IBM in 1958 to work on low noise computers and office machines, leading him to a career in noise control engineering. He was a leader in this field, helping found in 1971 the International Institute of Noise Control Engineering, dedicated to the application of "physical and engineering principles to the control of environmental noise." His involvement in standards-setting bodies like ANSI led to the formation of certain advances in measurement techniques (IEEE)
  • Langer, Bill - geologist with over forty years of experience with the US Geological Survey, with the last two decades devoted to research on industrial minerals and aggregates. He holds a master’s degree in geology from Boston University after completing a bachelor’s in geology at Alfred University (AIME)
  • Langer, Erich - studied at the University of Vienna and joined Philips Austria in 1963, where he stayed until his retirement in 1996. During his time at Philips, Länger concentrated on video recording equipment. In the interview, he recounts the milestones in the technology, from the EL-3400 – which only recorded in black-and-white and required threading the tape through a drum – through the Video 2000 cassette system, which recorded in color (IEEE)
  • Lapostolle, Pierre - studied at the École des Telecommunications before his military service with the Allied forces during World War II. After the war, Lapostolle joined the Paris laboratory of the French Centre National d'Études des Telecommunications (CNET), researching microwave amplification. His work on the traveling wave tube and particle acceleration shaped his 1947 Ph.D. thesis, directed by A. Blanc LaPierre. In the mid 1950s, Lapostolle joined CERN, the Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire, and worked on the design and installation of its proton synchrotron in Geneva. Around 1960, Lapostolle's work at CERN transitioned to particle separation and then to machine improvements. He developed a new, longer accelerator, still in use by CERN at the time of this 1996 interview (IEEE)
  • Larsen, Peer Martin - 1995–1996 director of IEEE Region 8, original member of the IEEE Denmark Section, serving as chair from 1970 to 1971 and 1985 to 1988 (IEEE)
  • Larson, Robert E. - 1982 IEEE President, a successful engineer/entrepreneur, as IEEE President he balanced the number of board members representing technical societies at ten, the same as the number of board members representing geographic regions (IEEE)
  • Lathrop, Jay - IEEE Fellow, joined the National Bureau of Standards' Harry Diamond Laboratories, where he worked the microminiaturization of solid-state circuits for the U.S. Department of Defense. For this work he was awarded the Department of the Army Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1959. The previous year Lathrop joined Texas Instruments, where he continued his work on miniaturization of integrated circuits. He joined the faculty of Clemson University in 1968, where he is a professor of electrical engineering. During the 1970s he oversaw students' research into the characteristics of solar cells and co-invented the solar chemical converter system of energy conversion (IEEE)
  • Laumond, Jean-Paul - transitioned from mathematics to robotics and made contributions in motion planning and anthropomorphic motion. Was involved at CNRS and robotics projects, such as HILARE (IEEE)
  • Laverick, Elizabeth - IEEE Fellow, IET Fellow, after graduating, Laverick went to work for GEC Stanmore, doing microwave research. She then joined the Elliott Brothers firm, working on microwave instruments and directing radar research. Eventually Laverick became Technical Director of the company. In 1971 she left Elliott Brothers to become Deputy Secretary of the Institute of Electrical Engineers (U.K.), where she focused on Institute expenditures, the accreditation process for university engineering programs, and on helping IEE develop technical standards for electrical engineers. She has been closely involved with the Women’s Engineering Society, and was chair of the Institute of Physics’ Women in Physics Committee. Laverick helps plan International Conferences of Women Engineers and Scientists, and encourages women to enter the engineering and science professions (IEEE)
  • Lavernia, Enrique J. - Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for the University of California, Irvine. As provost, Dr. Lavernia is UCI’s chief academic and operating officer, with primary responsibility for the university’s teaching and research enterprise, which includes 16 schools, nearly 5,500 faculty and more than 190 degree programs (AIME)
  • Law, Harold B. - Focused on the development of camera tubes, including work on the image orthicon, the vidicon camera tube, and the photo-deposition of phosphors (IEEE)
  • Law, Patricia - studied engineering at Penn State University and later Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She has worked at Pratt & Whitney and Teledyne (SWE)
  • Lawrence, Robert - consulting applications engineer for Westinghouse who ultimately became head of Westinghouse's Electrical Utility Engineering Unit. He received a bachelor's degree from Pratt Institute, and specialized in electrical engineering. After his graduation, he went to work for Westinghouse, eventually interning in and then being placed with the Central Station Engineering unit in Pittsburgh, which specialized in applications engineering. He is best known for his development of a high voltage DC transmission system for residential areas, which, although it offered a cost-effective and technologically efficient approach to power transmission, failed due to marketing and economic issues (IEEE)
  • Lax, Benjamin - At the MIT Rad Lab, worked on the L’il Abner radar, AN/TPS-10, and X-band height-finder (IEEE)
  • Layne, Peggy (2010-1) - SWE President and Life Fellow, director of AdvanceVT and Faculty Projects at Virginia Tech since 2003. Layne received a bachelor's and master's degree in environmental engineering from Vanderbilt University the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, respectively. She spent nearly two decades as a consulting engineer on waste treatment and regulatory support projects. In 1998 and 1999 Layne served as an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Congressional Fellow, consulting on waste policy issues in the office of U.S. Senator Bob Graham (SWE)
  • Layne, Peggy (2010-2) (SWE)
  • Layne, Peggy (SWE)
  • Lebel, Jean - began his relationship with IEEE (or more properly, its predecessor IRE) as a student at École Supérieure d'Électricité in France and read the publication, Proceedings of IRE. After returning to Europe, he continued to develop IRE’s presence in Europe. He helped in the founding of the French and Switzerland Sections in 1961 and 1960 respectively. After the the IRE made the transition to IEEE, he served as the Region 8 Director from 1965-1966. In this role he traveled to all the sections and started the participation of Region 8 in the Student Paper Contest (IEEE)
  • Lederer, Ernst - electrical engineer who worked for RCA, and National Union Vacuum Tube Company and Westinghouse. Lederer was born in Bohemia, developed a passion for technology early in life, and counted Abraham Lincoln and Thomas Edison among his heroes. After an unsuccessful foray into independent inventing, he served in World War I as an educator. After the War, Lederer accepted an offer from Westinghouse to work on lamp filament research. He later became one of the company's leading researchers in vacuum tubes. After working briefly for National Union, he took a job in the vacuum tube research department of Radio Corporation of America. Lederer contributed substantially to the design and manufacture of special tubes for British and American radar systems. During World War II, he traveled in Britain as a consultant to vacuum tube manufacturers and returned after 1945 to accept a position at Westinghouse. There, he worked on the development of television tubes (IEEE)
  • Lee, Daniel - worked in robotics, including research at Bell Labs and the University of Pennsylvania's GRASP Lab (IEEE)
  • Lee, J. Kwon - educated at Seoul National University and began his career working for the Korean government, first for the Ministry of Defense and later for the Ministry of Telecommunications. He then moved to Lucky Gold Star (LG) and moved up the ranks to eventually become Vice Chairman of the Corporation. In this interview, Lee speaks about LG's early days, its creation of military technology as well as its competition and collaborations with other corporations. Lee also speaks about Gold Star's marketing strategies and his role in the Korea Manufacturers' Association (IEEE)
  • Lee, Robert - engineer whose inventions reflect the best of ingenuity, devoted his life’s work and entire career to the field of metallurgy while working with Air Liquide Canada. Dr. Lee is known for inventing techniques to refine metal that have increased production efficiency worldwide and for pioneering the development of the GAZAL process, the precursor to ladle metallurgy. His invention of the annular tuyere resulted in the OBM/QBOP steel refining process and the QSL Process for continuous smelting of lead sluphide concentrates and now being commercialized for smelting of copper sulphide concentrates (AIME)
  • Lee, W. John - Known throughout the world as a leader in petroleum reservoir engineering, W. John Lee headed Exxon Company's US Major Fields Study Group where he supervised integrated field studies of Exxon's largest domestic reservoirs. Lee later went on to specialize in reservoir engineering for unconventional gas reservoirs as the executive vice president of S.A. Holditch & Associates. During 2007-2008, he served as an Academic Engineering Fellow with the US Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) in Washington, D.C. where he was the principal architect of the modernized SEC rules for reporting oil and gas reserves. (SPE)
  • Leeson, David - IEEE Life Fellow, received his Ph.D. from Stanford University (Hughes Fellow) in 1962, M.S. from MIT (NSF Fellow), and B.S. from Caltech. He is consulting professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, serves as a director for wireless companies, and is executive officer of Leeson Foundation. Leeson has written a book on Yagi antennas and published seminal IEEE papers on nonlinear frequency multipliers, radar, and oscillator stability (“Leeson’s Model of Oscillator Noise”) (IEEE)
  • Lehman, Meir - Lehman obtained his Ph.D. in 1957 and moved to Haifa, Israel, where he continued his work for the Israeli Defense Ministry, designing low-budget digital computers with magnetic core memories. He helped develop second address registers (modifiers) and the use of printed circuit boards. Lehman then moved to the United States to work for IBM in its Yorktown Heights laboratory. There he designed arithmetic units for the supercomputer project and researched parallel processing. Between 1965 and 1968 he managed the Yorktown Heights Integrated Multi-Processor Project, which used simulation in hardware design. In 1972 Lehman began teaching at Imperial College, designing undergraduate courses in computing and control. In 1979 he became the head of the department, and helped found the Imperial Software Company in 1982. At the time of the interview, Lehman was on part-time contract with Imperial College after taking early retirement in the mid-1980s (IEEE)
  • Lehmann, Gerard - IEEE Life Fellow and an officer of the Légion d'Honeur, after World War II, Lehmann predicted industrial growth potential in servo-mechanics. As an employee of ITT's Paris laboratory, Lehmann established Société des Servomécanismes Électroniques (SME), a company to manufacture mechanical equipment. With SME's sale to Compagnie Générale d’Électricité (later Alcatel-Alsthom), Lehmann became Chief Scientist at CGE. There, his projects included research for the TGV high-speed train network. In his capacity as Chief Scientist, he also evaluated the economics of the electric car and of high-voltage power transmission in Africa. Lehmann retired in 1975 but continued to work in the larger field of electronics. (IEEE)
  • Leverenz, Humboldt W. - Worked on luminescent materials for development of an all-electronic television and made significant contributions to the development of the fluorescent lamp (IEEE)
  • Levine, Judah - joined the National Bureau of Standards in 1969, where he worked on various applications of frequency-stabilized lasers including laser radar systems and a 30 m interferometer that he used for various geophysical studies. He moved to the Time and Frequency division of NBS in 1972 and has worked in many areas of time and frequency since that time. His work in includes the design and realization of the NBS/NIST time scale that is used to compute UTC(NIST) and a number of applications to distribute time and frequency information to users by various digital methods (IEEE)
  • Levy, Moises - IEEE Life Fellow, Levy's research, chiefly at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, focused on the intersection of ultrasonics and superconductivity. He also played a central role in the development and evolution of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity (IEEE)
  • Lewis, Clayton (Nov 2020) - Coleman-Turner Professor of Computer Science and Fellow of the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. His research involves technology and disability, human-computer interaction, educational technology, new approaches to programming, and representation and computation. He holds a BA from Princeton, an MS from MIT, and a PhD from Michigan. He worked for IBM prior to joining the University of Colorado. He is a member of the ACM CHI Academy and University of Colorado President’s Teaching Scholar (IEEE)
  • Lewis, Clayton (Dec 2020) (IEEE)
  • Lewis, Frank - Worked as a liaison between the MIT Radiation Lab crew and various government labs (IEEE)
  • Lewis, Peter - IEEE Life Fellow, had thirty-three year career at PSE&G and then joined the IEEE staff as Managing Director of Educational Activities. He has been a member of IEEE and its predecessor organizations, the Institute of Radio Engineers and the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, since 1955. He joined the IEEE Foundation Board in 2002 and was elected an IEEE Foundation director emeritus in 2008 (IEEE)
  • Li, Ta M. - In 1974, he joined SME as Technical Editor of Mining Engineering ultimately serving as its Editor in Chief. Highlights included special articles on Ocean Mining, China’s Mining Industry, Mining in the Far East, and Mining Education. His work history included stints with Golder Associates, Pincock, Allen & Holt, Behre Dolbear, Tetra Tech and Washington Group International. For the latter group, he won five consecutive Corporate Lion Awards resulting in over $550 million in sales to the organization. He was elected 2001 President of SME and most recently was awarded with AIME Honorary Member in 2015. He served as AIME Trustee three times and as Treasurer from 2017-2020 (AIME)
  • Liaw, Peter K. - ASM Fellow, after working at the Westinghouse Research and Development (R&D) Center for thirteen years, he joins the faculty and becomes an Endowed Ivan Racheff Chair of Excellence in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at The University of Tennessee (UT), Knoxville, since March 1993. He has been working in the areas of fatigue, fracture, nondestructive evaluation, and life-prediction methodologies of structural alloys and composites. Since joining UT, his research interests include mechanical behavior, nondestructive evaluation, biomaterials, and processing of high- temperature alloys and ceramic-matrix composites and coatings with the kind and great help of his colleagues at UT and the nearby Oak Ridge National Laboratory (AIME)
  • Liddell, Heather - Liddell began her research career at Queen Mary College before joining the nascent Computer Science department. Her work, which applies programming to numerical problems and analysis, has covered laser optical filters, ICL and Atlas computers, and IBM machines (IEEE)
  • Lightner, Michael - 2006 IEEE President, IEEE Life Fellow, and Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, has long been a faculty member of the Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering Department of the University of Colorado. As IEEE President, he attempted to create a lower-cost membership model (IEEE)
  • Lillie, Joseph V. - received the B.S. in Electrical Engineering (1974) and the M.S. in Telecommunications (1997) from the University of Southwestern Louisiana. He worked in telecommunications engineering and management for forty-six years and he has served in numerous IEEE positions at the section and region, and international levels, including as Region 5 Director (2000-2001). (IEEE)
  • Lin, Ming - authored or co-authored more than 250 papers in refereed technical and scientific publications and has edited, co-edited, or authored four books. She is known for her work on collision detection as well as the Lin-Canny algorithm (IEEE)
  • Liskov, Barbara (1991) - A pioneer in object-oriented programming whose work on data abstraction led to the design and implementation of CLU (IEEE)
  • Liskov, Barbara (2001) (IEEE)
  • Little, Joyce - During her academic career, Little created courses, published, and lectured on metrics and assurance for quality in software engineering, the impact, cyber-ethics for workforce education, and the role of women in computing. Little was a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Data Processing Management Association (now AITP), and the IEEE Computer Society. (IEEE)
  • Liu, Bede - IEEE Life Fellow, worked for the Bell Laboratories technical staff from 1959 to 1962, and then joined the faculty of Princeton University. His pioneering digital signal processing research has focused upon floating-point arithmetic, developing various digital filters and processor programs, image processing for HDTV and medical imaging, and especially the development of discrete-time signal and system theory (IEEE)
  • Ljung, Lennart - IEEE Life Fellow, attended Lund University, earning a Ph.D. in Automatic Control (1974). His research field is control theory (IEEE)
  • Longobardo, Anna - SWE Fellow, first woman to receive a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Columbia University, doing so in 1949. She received her master's degree from Columbia in 1952. Longobardo entered the new area of analog and digital computer applications and has since made major contributions to the aerospace engineering field. She worked as a systems engineer for American Bosch Arma Corporation for 15 years, after which she joined Sperry Rand Corp. (later Unisys Corp.), where she worked for more than 25 years in a number of positions in areas of technology management. Longobardo was appointed to the New York State Women's Council in 1963, served as Director of the Technical Societies Council of New York from 1966-1970 (SWE)
  • Lopez, Antonio Luque - doctoral research was on lasers, and he became interested in the newly-born field of semiconductor research. He became a full professor of Electronics at the University of Madrid by 1970, at a young age, and was soon head of the Semiconductor Laboratory. During a visit to America ca. 1974 Luque became aware of the even-newer field of photovoltaics (solar energy) and decided to shift focus there, where he and Spain could do leading-edge research. In 1979 the Semiconductor Laboratory became the Institute for Solar Energy; since then it has grown slowly but steadily in quality and numbers. A second attempt at manufacture, this time of solar cells, produced the successful company of Isofoton, based at first on Luque’s invention of the bifacial solar cell. With some outside assistance and takeovers (Abengoa and Alcatel early, Verges later), Isofoton has now become profitable, one of the top ten photovoltaic firms in the world (IEEE)
  • Lovegrove, Gillian - Lovegrove’s academic career began at Cambridge, where she worked in the Maths Lab on EDSAC. She has taught at Portsmouth, Southampton, Staffordshire, and Northumbria, where she is currently Emeritus Professor of Computing and Software (IEEE)
  • Lovell, James - pioneer in the American space program, participated in the Gemini and Apollo missions, and was the first person to make a second voyage to the moon. Lovell retired from the U.S. Navy with the rank of Captain and later became President of Fisk Telephone Systems, an independent telecommunications company based in Houston, Texas (IEEE)
  • Lowden, Donald - technician who has worked on radios, TVs, and computers. He worked on a variety of technical jobs after he graduated grade school, eventually specializing in radio repair. He was also a ham radio enthusiast. From about 1937 to 1942 he worked as a radio repairman for General Electric; from 1942 to 1974 he worked as a technician for the National Cash Register Company (NCR). During World War II he worked under Joe Desch, primarily wiring, soldering, and assembling initial designs (IEEE)
  • Lowell, J. David - began his career as a mining engineer and shift boss with Asarco in Mexico, followed by a job as an exploration geologist with the Atomic Energy Commission on the Colorado Plateau. After spending time at Stanford to fill out his geology background, he returned to uranium exploration in Utah for a subsidiary of Ventures Limited of Canada whose CEO was Thayer Lindsley, a legendary explorationist. The Ventures work evolved into porphyry copper search in Arizona, where his career-long interest in porphyry copper exploration was born. In 1959, he became district geologist specializing in porphyry copper exploration for Utah Construction in San Francisco. Lowell became an independent consultant in 1961. Between 1961 and 1990 he worked for 110 companies in 26 countries, largely in porphyry copper exploration (AIME)
  • Lowrie, Raymond L. - joined the US Bureau of Mines and did technical studies while stationed in Denver, Colorado and Washington D.C. He earned an MS degree in mineral economics from Colorado School of Mines in 1972. He enforced regulations to mitigate the environmental effects of coal mining as Chief of Reclamation for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources in Columbus; and was instrumental in developing the Ohio statute governing mining industrial minerals. He became Chief of the Intermountain Field Operations Center for the Bureau of Mines, which collected salient mineral industry data and conducted engineering and economic studies. After Congress passed the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, he was appointed Regional Director of the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) in Kansas City, Missouri. He continued serving OSMRE as Administrator of its Eastern Technical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Assistant Director of Western Field Operations in Denver, Colorado (AIME)
  • Lozano-Perez, Tomas - worked at the AI Lab and IBM and involved in robotics projects, such as HANDEY (IEEE)
  • Lucietto, Anne - SWE Fellow, received a mechanical engineering degree from Marquette University. Anne received a Ph.D. from Purdue University after working in industry and teaching as community college adjunct faculty member for over 20 years (SWE)
  • Lucky, Robert - Long-time Bell labs employee who invented automatic adaptive equalizers and researched digital switching (IEEE)
  • Luxbacher, George - 2012 SPE President, 2008 SME President, Principal at MELM Consulting, LLC, providing liability management services to the mining, oil & gas, chemical industries related to environmental issues and discontinued operations. After graduating from Penn State, he began his career in the early 1970s as a mining engineer for Pittsburgh Coal Company (a then Consolidation Coal Company subsidiary), leaving to return to Penn State for his MS and PhD degrees. After graduation in 1980 he joined Occidental Research Corporation, remaining employed by various Occidental Petroleum Corporation subsidiaries, including Island Creek Coal Company and Glenn Springs Holdings, Inc. (Occidental’s environmental remediation/reclamation subsidiary), until he retired in 2015 as Senior VP at GSH. After retirement he formed MELM to return to his mining roots (AIME)
  • Lyon, Theodore, F. - Managing Director-Bulk Metals with responsibility for Hatch’s Iron & Steel, Bauxite, Alumina, Aluminum, and Magnesium Businesses throughout the world. He is also president & CEO of Hatch Associates Consultants Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa., USA — the U.S.-based unit of the Hatch Group. He is responsible for client development, technology development and applications, project development and execution and overall business performance associated with Hatch’s advisory, technical consulting, engineering, and project delivery services to bulk metals industries worldwide (AIME)

M

  • Macdonald, J. Ross - worked at Armour Research Foundation and the Argonne National Laboratory before joining Texas Instruments in 1953. He was Director of the TI Physics Research Laboratory for several years and then became Director of the TI Central Research Laboratories. He served as TI's Vice President of Corporate Research and Engineering from 1968 until 1972, and was Vice President of Corporate Research and Development from 1973 until 1974. He was named the William Kenan Professor of Physics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1974. His research has been in areas such as ferromagnetic resonance, the electrical behavior of solids, electrical circuits, dielectric and mechanical relaxation, electrolyte double layers, and numerical analysis of experiments (IEEE)
  • Machtemes Lunde, Allison - received a bachelor's and master's degree in civil engineering and an MBA from Iowa State University. After several internships she accepted a position as a structural engineer at Barr Engineering in 2011. After being deeply involved in the Society of Women Engineers Iowa State University Section, she became involved in Society-level committees and served on SWE's board of directors in 2011 as the Society's collegiate director (SWE)
  • Maclennan, Carol G. - completed an internship with the Bell Labs acoustics department during her undergraduate education at Pembroke College, returning to Bell Labs for employment in 1960. Excluding a brief period of employment on the computing staff of Cornell University, Maclennan worked at Bell Labs until her retirement in 2001. During her career, Maclennan worked on the block diagram (BLODI) compiler for speech processing and on spacecraft data analysis. She analyzed data from Jupiter and worked on the Pioneer and Voyager Missions project. Maclennan published over two hundred papers on a variety of topics in geophysics, including an index for gravitational waves based on the Chicago Stock Exchange. Maclennan details some of these publications and describes her research collaborations. Maclennan advanced to the position of MTS (member of technical staff) in 1980, working on instrument fieldwork for the magnetometer in Greenland and the Antarctic, and then on satellite communications (IEEE)
  • Madden, Diana - senior electrical engineer at Schiller and Hersh Associates, where she designs lighting, power, and fire protection systems. She received an electrical engineering degree from Drexel University in 2004. Madden is actively involved in the Society of Women Engineers, having served as the president of the SWE Philadelphia Section. She received the Society's Oustanding Counselor Award in 2009 for her active support of its Drexel University collegiate section (SWE)
  • Maerfeld, Charles - pioneering works started as early as 1969 as he made the first experimental demonstration of the Bleustein Gulyaev wave. He demonstrated the existence of a New Shear Interfacial Wave now called the Maerfeld-Tournois Wave. His detailed analysis of the functioning of the Multistrip Coupler led to the invention of a beam width compressor that he used to build an efficient SAW Convolver (IEEE)
  • Malozemoff, Alexis P. - IEEE Life Fellow, spent the first nineteen years of his career at IBM research, where he was best known for the co-discovery of the “giant flux creep” and the irreversibility line in high temperature superconductors (HTS). He spent the remainder of his career at American Superconductor, where he was in charge, among other activities, of AMSC’s rise to a leading role in high temperature superconducting wire and its applications (IEEE)
  • Malozemoff, Plato - Chairman Emeritus and a Director of Newmont Mining Corporation and serves as a consultant to Newmont. He is a Director of Browning-Ferris Industries, Inc., of Houston. Mr. Malozemoff received a B.S. in Mining Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley and an M.S. In Metallurgical Engineering from the Montana School of Mines. He held various positions in metallurgical research, laboratory and field metallurgy, and in private gold mining enterprises prior to joining Newmont Mining Corporation as a mining engineer in 1945. At Newmont Mr. Malozemoff held several positions of increasing corporate responsibility until his retirement as Chief Executive Officer in 1985 (AIME)
  • Marimuthu, Ramalatha - educator for more than three decades with a vast experience in motivating and training the students on skill development and peer networking through leadership training workshops, international competitions, conferences and congresses. She also guides the students in developing unique solutions for social problems like inclusiveness and accessibility in day to day life for people with special needs. She has delivered lectures on assistive technology in universities and conferences all over the world and in Google, Mountainview and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland. Her areas of interest are assistive technology, women empowerment and effective education. She is the founder and General Chair of Youth Endeavours in Social Innovations through Science and Technology (YESIST12) which encourages students and young professionals to innovate for the benefit of humanity through trainings and competitions (IEEE)
  • Marko, Hans - telecommunications engineer and professor in Germany. He studied at the Technische Hochschule Stuttgart until 1951 when he earned his diploma in communication studies. His doctoral thesis was on distortion and frequency modulation. After working for a company affiliated with ITT, he went to work at SEL where he worked on data transmission over telephone lines, focusing particularly on error-detecting codes. In 1962, he was offered professorships at both the University of Aachen and the University of Munich; he accepted the position at Munich and taught communications techniques there until he retired (IEEE)
  • Marrs, Margaret - After working for Ferranti Computing Sytems, Marrs joined the faculty of Norwich University (IEEE)
  • Mason, Matt - IEEE Life Fellow, discusses his career in robotics, in particular in compliant motion, force control, and fine motion planning. Outlining his involvement in projects at IBM, MIT, and Carnegie Mellon University, he provides insight into the state and evolution of robotics. Describing his current work on manipulation and robotic hands, he comments on the future of robotics at Carnegie Mellon University and of the field as a whole (IEEE)
  • Mason, Warren P. - took a position with the Western Electric Company. While employed by Western Electric (later Bell Telephone Laboratories), he completed work on both a masters and Ph.D. at Columbia University. His early work involved carrier research as well as quartz crystal research. Mason also worked with ferroelectric crystals, and after WWII, his work was transferred to Shockley's solid-state division, where he focused on piezoelectric crystals and dielectric properties. From 1948, until his retirement from Bell in 1965, he headed the Mechanics Research Department, where he was involved in investigating mechanical properties of a vast array of materials and structures as they applied to Bell System uses. Upon retiring from Bell, Mason held a visiting professor appointment at Columbia University, and was a Senior Research Associate at the Henry Crumb School of Mines (IEEE)
  • Massalski, Thaddeus - Professor Emeritus of Materials Science, Engineering and Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, formerly one of the directors of the Mellon Institute, and Institute Professor. Ted Massalski was born in Warsaw, Poland, which he left at age 16 to fight with the Polish Second Corps in the British 8th Army during World War II. He stayed in Italy to begin his college education, which he then completed in London and Birmingham. His academic career began in 1955 at the Institute for the Study of Metals at the University of Chicago. As confirmed by his curriculum vitae at the back of this oral history, Dr. Massalski is the author of hundreds of publications and several key scientific discoveries over the decades of his service to the field of metallurgy (AIME)
  • Massey, James L. - Interested in communications engineering and information theory. He did significant work in forward-error-correcting codes, multi-user communications, and cryptographic systems (IEEE)
  • Masterson, Earl - joined RCA in Indianapolis, from 1941 to 1951 he worked in a group developing sound-on-film recording, and which moved to Camden after the end of World War II. Masterson worked on 16 mm sound-on-film projectors, automatic sound recording pick-ups, the 45-rpm record, and magnetic wire recording. This led to work on experimental tapes to record both sound and video, which in turn contributed to the home movie industry before the days of videotape. Masterson then began developing magnetic recording for digital information storage. In 1951 he moved from RCA to Univac, where he helped build computer printers. Twelve years after joining Univac, he moved to Honeywell, where he worked on peripheral equipment for computers. In 1977 he retired and began his own consulting company (IEEE)
  • Mataric, Maja - IEEE Fellow, is the Chan Soon-Shiong Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, Neuroscience, and Pediatrics at the University of Southern California, and is a pioneer in human-robot interaction for socially assistive robotics (IEEE)
  • Mates, Robert - Biomedical engineering researcher, faculty of the University of Buffalo and founder of their Center for Biomedical Engineering (IEEE)
  • Matlock, David K. - University Emeritus Professor in the George S. Ansell Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Golden, Colorado, USA. He joined the CSM faculty in 1972 and was involved in teaching and research, primarily related to the mechanical properties of materials. He served as director of the Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, an industry-university cooperative research center at CSM, from 1993 through 2013 (AIME)
  • Matthies, Larry - Senior Research Scientist of Robotics at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has spent extensive time on the NASA Mars Rover project (IEEE)
  • Mattson, Gail - 2001 SWE President, SWE Fellow, received bachelor's degrees in biology and chemistry from Baker University. When she wasn't accepted into medical school, she was hired at Bechtel to work in cost schedule engineering. After a decade in the field, in 1980 she returned to school to pursue a master's degree in environmental engineering at the University of Washington. She has worked in environmental engineering since that time at a number of corporations (SWE)
  • Maurer, William C. - spent his career spearheading changes for the petroleum industry, including his extensive research into novel drilling techniques, drilling mechanics, rock mechanics, drill bit design, downhole drilling motors, high-pressure jet drilling, horizontal drilling, and advanced drilling tools. He holds 38 patents on oilfield downhole drilling and completion tools. In the 1980s, Maurer organized an effort, known as the DEA 44, to develop tools that would drill horizontal wells. Maurer has authored more than 60 published works, including two books on drilling technology and was inducted into the US National Academy of Engineering in 1992. (SPE)
  • Maxfield, Joseph - best known for his contributions to the development of the phonograph and sound recording for movies. He graduated from college in 1910, and after several years of teaching, took a position with the Western Electric Company. After serving in WWI, he began his work on high-quality recording for Bell (IEEE)
  • Mayer, Ferdy - In 1957, he started a private independent R&D company in France, Laboratories D'electronique et D'automatique (LEAD). Mayer has focused on basic physical research and valued person-to-person contacts as a means to obtain technological and scientific information. He has taught at several universities and offered numerous seminars for companies, providing his ideas for new products and applications. Ferdy Mayer has also established companies in different parts of the world, including England and the United States (IEEE)
  • Mayo, John - went to work at Bell Labs, his first work was the use of a Transistorized Digital Computer for control systems, especially radar applications. He then became supervisor for the T1 carrier project, department head, director of ocean systems (military applications), executive director of the #4ESS project (commercial telecommunications), executive vice president of Bell Labs in 1979, president of Bell Labs in 1991, and reached mandatory retirement age in 1995. He had a role in the creation of a new R&D paradigm that set the stage for Lucent Technologies, formed in 1996. His career also included work in the Pulse Code Modulation system, the Telstar satellite, and wireless communications (IEEE)
  • McAfee, Naomi (2003) - Began as an Associate Mathematician in reliability engineering and became the first female supervisory engineer and Section Manager at Westinghouse. Worked on various projects such as airborne radar, APQ 120, AWACS, lunar camera and CAALS (SWE)
  • McAfee, Naomi (2010 - IEEE) (IEEE)
  • McAfee, Naomi (2010 - SWE) (IEEE)
  • McCarthy, John - a long time professor of computer science at Stanford, was a founder of the field of artificial intelligence and applied artificial intelligence to robotic arms. He also devised the LISP programming language. (IEEE)
  • McCarthy, Mary - SWE Fellow, joined the Civil Service during World War II and spent the war years repairing damaged planes and testing aviation communications equipment in San Antonio and Hawaii. After the war, she did not return to school or work until 1968 when, at the age of 45, McCarthy enrolled in San Francisco City College. McCarthy transferred to the University of California, Berkeley in 1973 to pursue engineering and completed her degrees in electrical engineering and material science in 1976. She was hired by Lockheed as a reliability engineer to work on parts control and standardization, and during her career at Lockheed she worked on military and aerospace projects such as the Hubble Space Telescope and later became the chairperson of the Parts Control Board (SWE)
  • McComas, Arthur - In 1943, McComas began working at Bendix Radio, starting in the test department then becoming a lab technician in microwave engineering. He was drafted into the Navy in about 1944, serving two years and participating in the electronic training Eddy program. McComas returned to Bendix after leaving the military and was re-hired as a junior engineer. During the course of his long career at Bendix, McComas was involved in many projects including ASR-3, SAGE, weather observation radar, ARIA, ATCRBS, MLS, Mark 15 and ADVENT, and became part of management. He was also active in the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA), serving on many special committees for U.S. National Aviation Standards. McComas retired from Bendix in 1986 and holds eight patents (IEEE)
  • McFall, Walter - McFall's early career at Argonne involved research in aqueous and liquid metal corrosion of nuclear reactor structural materials. In the 1970s he transitioned to a career in technical recruiting at Argonne, retiring as the laboratory's principle outreach recruiting coordinator in 2000 (SWE)
  • McFarlan, Ronald - Began in academia, where he worked on the effects of X-rays on crystals, and later moved to the private sector, where he worked at United Drug, BB Chemical Co., Bulova Watch Co., and Raytheon. He later became the 1960 president of IRE (IEEE)
  • McGhee, Bob - worked on guided missiles, walking robots, and unmanned submarines, as well as various robotics projects, such as the phony pony and the bionic bug (IEEE)
  • McLaughlin, Donald H. - spent most of his distinguished career with Homestake Mining Company, one of America’s largest gold producers, where he played a key role in expanding gold reserves at the company’s mine in South Dakota. He began his long, inspiring career there in 1926 as Consulting Geologist and subsequently served as Director, President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board. He served as a Professor and Chairman of the Department of Geology at Harvard from 1925 to 1941, and had a lifelong association with the University of California, serving as Dean of the College of Mining, Professor of Mining Engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering at Berkeley. A chair in mineral engineering was established in his name in the University’s College of Engineering. He served as Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Raw Materials and as a member of the Plowshare Advisory Committee of the Atomic Energy Commission (1947, 1972). He was a member of the Advisory Committee for the U.S. Geological Survey and of the National Science Foundation (AIME)
  • McLean, Alexander - With over four hundred and fifty publications and six books Professor McLean is recognized for his substantial contributions to the physical chemistry of steelmaking. Other research activities have included the chemistry of oxide melts, plasma processing, sensor development, novel continuous casting studies and materials for lithium-ion batteries (AIME)
  • McLeod, Harry O., jr. - devoted his career to evaluating well behavior and making continuous improvements to project technology. At Phillips, he implemented trials of new stimulation treatments; at Exxon, he made an impact focusing on artificial-lift and hydraulic-fracturing systems; and at Dowell, he developed a formation analysis technique for evaluating wells when using acid treatments. Later, at Conoco, with others, he designed a fracturing model used to eliminate screenouts by using control measures (SPE)
  • McNaul, James - joined the Army Signal Corps as an engineer before joining the private sector. He served as the second president of the EMC Society, which he helped to found (IEEE)
  • McPherson, John - invited by Mr. Watson to join IBM. He was assigned to the Railroad Department as a trainee and got his own sales assignment in less than a year. McPherson started out in New York and was transferred to Philadelphia. When he came back to New York, he worked with the Railroad Group, whose goal was to provide statistics of the movement of freight and passengers. Before taking the position of Director, he worked on the Harvard Mark I, which IBM was encouraged in building by an instructor at Harvard, Professor Howard Aiken. In about 1940, McPherson worked with Aberdeen Proving Ground and introduced it IBM punched-card machines. After the war, IBM moved toward producing electronics, and McPherson participated in developing the 603, 604, 607 and SSEC. In 1948, McPherson was made a vice president, and from around 1960, he handled Systems Research Institute for five years as titular head. From 1966, he took interest in the APL business and focused on the job. (IEEE)
  • McQuiston, Frank Woods, Jr. - In 1938, Mr. McQuiston organized the metallurgical research and development division of Newmont Exploration Limited. From 1941 to 1948 he worked as a metallurgist for Newmont and other western mining operations where he developed several flotation techniques now used in base metal mineral separations in the United States and Africa. (AIME)
  • Mecklenbrauker, Wolfgang - received his engineering degree and PhD at the technical university in Aachen; he specialized in network theory, with relevance to filters and circuit theory. He started working at Philips in 1971, working on digital signal processing and digital filters with J. B. H. Peek and Dr. Claasen. Some of his particular work was on limit cycles, digital filters and data transmission, two-dimensional filtering, reactance frequency transformation, the transmultiplexer, transposition, and his discovery of the Wigner distribution. Ca. 1980 he went to the Technical University of Vienna (IEEE)
  • Meehan, Nathan - 2016 SPE President, senior executive adviser at Baker Hughes, advising executive management on reservoir and geoscience issues. Previously, he was president of CMG Petroleum Consulting, vice president of engineering for Occidental Oil & Gas; and general manager exploration and production at Union Pacific Resources (SPE)
  • Meindl, James - IEEE Life Fellow, recipient of the 2006 IEEE Medal of Honor for "For pioneering contributions to microelectronics, including low power, biomedical, physical limits and on-chip interconnect networks", was Director and Pettit Chair Professor of the Joseph M. Pettit Microelectronic Research Center at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta developed micropower integrated circuits for portable military equipment at the U.S. Army Electronics Laboratory in Fort Monmouth, New Jersey. He then joined Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, where he developed low-power integrated circuits and sensors for a portable electronic reading aid for the blind, miniature wireless radio telemetry systems for biomedical research, and non-invasive ultrasonic imaging and blood-flow measurement systems. Dr. Meindl was the founding director of the Integrated Circuits Laboratory and a founding co-director of the Center for Integrated Systems at Stanford. The latter was a model for university and industry cooperative research in microelectronics (IEEE)
  • Menzel, Mary Tsingou - Menzel worked in applied mathematics at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Among her contributions to defense research is her work on the “proton storage ring.” (IEEE)
  • Meren, Lou - Worked in Westinghouse management positions in the Power Generation Section, Equipment Design Engineering, Tactical Radars, the Surveillance Radar Division, Westinghouse Airships, and the CCCI&M Division. Projects he worked on include BOMARC, Deep Submergence Systems, FAA Scan Converter, ARSR-3/ARSR-4, Hawk Digital Processor, TPS-70 and NAAWS (IEEE)
  • Merrill, Edward - A pioneer in the field of biomedical engineering and faculty at MIT for 60 years. At MIT he launched biomedical engineering as a major focus of their chemical engineering department (IEEE)
  • Mersereau, Russell - His MIT doctoral work, on building multidimensional images from projections of two-dimensional objects, resulted in the dissertation, “The Reconstruction of Multidimensional Signals from their Projections.” As a post-doc, he wrote a Thompson Award-winning paper (1975) with Dan Dudgeon on multidimensional digital filter design. Dudgeon has tended to apply the work to sonar array processing, Merserau to medical imaging. Mersereau also collaborated with Wolfgang Mecklenbräuker and Tom Quatieri on multidimensional digital filters. At Georgia Tech, Mersereau co-wrote a textbook with Dan Dudgeon on two dimensional digital signal processing. As noted in this interview, Mersereau's research has included hexagonal sampling, iterative signal restoration algorithms, image restoration, image modeling, two-stage multirate coding of color images, and video coding. Mersereau also describes his mentorship of graduate students researching a variety of topics (IEEE)
  • Messerschmitt, David G. - IEEE Fellow, pioneer in the field of communications. His contributions include research on VLSI architecture for signal-processing problems, in particular its modeling and simulation in software, and the development of advanced software techniques, including Blosim and Ptolemy. Dr. Messerschmitt is currently the Roger A. Strauch Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California at Berkeley, and he has written or co-authored several pioneering textbooks, most recently Software Ecosystem: Understanding an Indispensable Technology and Industry with Clemens Szyperski (2003) (IEEE)
  • Metcalfe, Robert - A main contributor to the development of the internet and founder of 3Com (IEEE)
  • Middleton, David (2000) - worked at the Radio Research Laboratory at Harvard during World War II, working on radar counter-measures, passive and active jamming. This work flowed into work on communication theory, the study of the transfer of information, as statistically based applied physics. He did his graduate work at Harvard, then taught there, but in 1955 shifted to a career in consulting. His career has centered on noise and signal communication theory, including work lately on scattered channels and models of interference (IEEE)
  • Middleton, David (2007) (IEEE)
  • Millar, Julian Z. - pioneer in electronics and the chief architect of Telex, became fascinated by amateur radio as a boy in high school. He taught himself Morse code and purchased his first radio set in 1915. Millar graduated from the University of Illinois in 1923, and despite his interest in talking movies, took a position with Western Union. Millar spent his entire career with Western Union, interrupted only by his service with the Signal Corps during WWII. After the war, Millar resumed his duties with Western Union in their Radio Research Division. He became assistant vice president in 1952 and retired from Western Union in 1965 (IEEE)
  • Mills, Judith - Mills worked as a programmer for Hepsworth’s the Tailors doing financial computing using COBOL. After teaching at Wakefield College, she joined General Electric as a systems developer (IEEE)
  • Milojicic, Dejan - IEEE Fellow, established researcher with a full career in industry, and is a long-term IEEE Computer Society volunteer. As a Computer Society Board of Governors member, he participated in developing the Computer Society 2011 Strategic Plan. He is the founding editor in chief of Computing Now and an IEEE Internet Computing editorial board member. He was appointed first Special Technical Communities chair, and served as past chair of the Computer Society Technical Committee on Operating Systems and on many program committees (ICDCS, CLOUD, and EDOC, among others). An IEEE-CS, ACM, and Usenix member for many years (IEEE)
  • Milstein, Laurence - had heavy involvement in IEEE’s Communications Society and Information Theory Society, worked at Hughes Aircraft (1968-74), RPI (1974-76), and UCSD (1976 to present). His research has largely been on spread spectrum communication and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). These technologies largely had military application (preventing jamming, hiding signals in noise) until about 1990, but have since acquired greater use in commercial wireless technology. CDMA is one of two digital cellular telephone technologies in widespread use in the United States. Milstein has largely been a theoretician (IEEE)
  • Minter, Jerry B. - helped to start Measurements Corporation in 1939. After the war, Minter and his company began working with television, including the Model 90 signal generator and later with developments in television color. He also became involved with connectors, and in the 1960s Minter worked on medical instrumentation which involved videotaping output from surgical microscopes. Minter has twenty-six patents, six of which are for recent work in aviation, another field he was involved in (IEEE)
  • Mintz, Max - worked in robotics at the CSL and the GRASP Lab, focusing on control theory and decision-making under uncertainty (IEEE)
  • Miskimins, Jennifer - Senior Consulting Engineer with Barree & Associates, a consulting firm specializing in stimulation and well performance optimization. Prior to joining the company in 2012, she was an Associate Professor in the Petroleum Engineering Department at the Colorado School of Mines, where she taught classes in completions and stimulation for over ten years and was the founder and director of the Fracturing, Acidizing, Stimulation Technology (FAST) Consortium. Dr. Miskimins still holds a part-time appointment at the university (SPE)
  • Mitra, Sanjit - graduated with his Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Utkal University in 1953. He then proceeded to the University of Calcutta, where he received his Master of Science degree in Radio Physics and Electronics in 1956. Moving to California to pursue more graduate work in computer engineering, Mitra earned a second master’s degree and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley. He then spent brief periods of time working at Bell Labs before devoting himself to his present fruitful academic career. Mitra was an EE professor at Cornell University from 1962 to 1965, and then with the University of California, Davis before moving to his present career position at the University of California, Santa Barbara (IEEE)
  • Mitsui, Toshio - graduated in Physics at the Hokkaido University, under the guidance of Prof. Furuichi. His area of research was on domain observations in Rochelle Salt. His research continued at the Pennsylvania State University (1956) with Prof. Pepinsky, Dr. Jona, and Dr. Okaya. His main scientific interests were on crystal symmetry and structure, using neutron diffraction at Brookhaven. These were early days of ferroelectrics, with new compounds being discovered at a rapid pace, as extended at MIT with Profs. Von Hippel, Newnham, and Westphal. Upon his return to Hokkaido University, he published his seminal book on “The Introduction to the Physics of Ferroelectrics” and completed ferroelectric data for Landolt-Bӧrnstein. In 1969, he moved to Osaka University, leaving ferroelectrics for the exciting field of biophysics (IEEE)
  • Moll, John - during World War II, Moll joined the war effort by working at RCA on magnetrons for radar jamming. Moll returned to Ohio State University for his doctorate in electrical engineering, which he received in 1952. During his long career, Moll worked at Bell Labs, Fairchild, Hewlett Packard and taught at Stanford. He took part in both device fabrication and research, building upon his interest in semiconductors, and worked with junction transistors, integrated circuits, solid-state switches, crystals, silicon, MOS and gallium arsenide. Moll is also famous for the Ebers-Moll Equations and p-n-p-n switch theory (IEEE)
  • Molnar, Andrew R. - A pioneer in computer-assisted education, Andrew Molnar earned his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Maryland in 1959, after taking a year off from his studies in 1956 to work on the design team for the Pratt & Whitney J-75 turbojet engine. Following a brief period in which he developed command evaluation systems for System Development Corporation, Dr. Molnar joined the faculty of American University in 1961 as Professor of Research at the Center for Research and Social Systems. In 1966, he joined the U.S. Office of Education as Acting Director for Higher Education Research, where he oversaw the development of computer-assisted instruction technologies. Joining the National Science Foundation’s Office of Computing Activities (OCA) in 1970, Dr. Molnar helped direct the continued development of CAI technologies, the deployment of internetworking for higher education and the development of university curricula. (IEEE)
  • Mondada, Franceso - spent his career at the the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne. His work has led to at least two commercial successes: the Khepera robot for laboratory applicatons and the E-Puck for educational applications (IEEE)
  • Montgomery, Carl - Senior Engineer with NSI Technologies located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He is recognized within the industry as one of the leaders, and most active professionals, in well stimulation and completions. He has extensive experience in the techniques, products and engineering practices of hydrocarbon well stimulation, sand control and completion practices. He also has considerable experience in cementing, conformance control, perforating strategy, and formation damage. Carl has helped set the standard for well stimulation within the industry and worked with others to pioneer non-conventional techniques for the design and implementation of stimulation of oil and gas wells (SPE)
  • Moore, Gordon Earl - IEEE Life Fellow, explains his involvement with the integrated circuit conception at Fairchild (IEEE)
  • Moose, Louis F. - Worked for the MIT Rad Lab magnetron group on X-band and/or 3-cm magnetron areas, and did application work for magnetrons and all X-band systems (IEEE)
  • Moreau, Roland - began his career with Exxon Company, U.S.A. as a Project Engineer at the Bayway Refinery in New Jersey in 1981. Since that time, he has held various technical, supervisory and managerial assignments for Exxon, and then ExxonMobil, in the Upstream production, development, and research organizations. Prior to ExxonMobil, Roland also worked for five years in the naval nuclear industry. Roland received his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1975, followed by an MBA in Finance from Fairleigh Dickinson University in 1984 (SPE)
  • Mori, Fusao - An electrical engineer who has worked in energy research and development (IEEE)
  • Morris, Dorothy - SWE Fellow, began her career in the engineering field as an administrative assistant in 1950 after graduating with a degree in business and accounting from Concordia Junior College. She returned to college to study engineering and in just eight years became Vice President and General Manager of Colvin Laboratories, Inc. Morris was also General Manager, Treasurer, and Vice President of Victory Engineering Corporation and went on to establish her own consulting firm, Morris Associates (SWE)
  • Morse, A. Stephen - From 1967 to 1970, he served a two year term of active duty (plus an additional year) with the Office of Control Theory (OCTA) at the NASA Electronics Research Center. After leaving the NASA lab in 1970, he came to Yale University where he is presently the Dudley Professor of Engineering. Morse served as a visiting scientist at the University of Toronto, as well as took part in several sabbaticals and leaves. including at Caltech, Australia, Osaka, and Florence (IEEE)
  • Morton, Pamela "Pam" - Morton started off as a civil servant, working as a researcher at the Laboratory of the Government Chemist, and a project leader at the Ministry of Technology. Her work as an educator at Greenwich University was recognized with the Peugeot/Talbot Council for Industry and Higher Education Partnership Award. While working in the Cabinet Office of the Women’s National Commission, she spearheaded a campaign to integrate women into scientific industries (IEEE)
  • Moura, José M. F. - 2019 IEEE President and IEEE Life Fellow, is the Philip L. and Marsha Dowd University Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and the U.S. National Academies Navy Study Board, corresponding member of Portugal Academy of Sciences, and Fellow of U.S. National Academy of Inventors, IEEE, and American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). (IEEE)
  • Mueller, Charles W. - A pioneer in solid-state electronics, he worked in RCA's tube department (IEEE)
  • Müller‎, K. Alex - studied physics at the ETH Zürich and finished his thesis in 1960 in the group of Prof. Busch with a work on the double perovskite SrTiO3. This compound was intensively investigated by him, and he achieved major success with breakthrough discoveries in this field. The following two years he joined the Batelle Institute in Geneva working in spin resonance. Meanwhile the IBM research center in Rüschlikon was founded where he was offered a position as scientific member to explore the field of ferroelectricity where he performed brilliantly. During a two years residence at IBM in the United States he developed interest in superconductivity which he focused on in the following years. The Nobel Prize award in 1987 crowned this work but did not finalize his scientific activities which were centered on the exploration of its origin (IEEE)
  • Mulligan, James - 1971 IEEE President, Mulligan spent much of his career as a faculty member and chair of the Electrical Engineering Department at New York University. Mulligan played an important role in implementing the AIEE/IRE merger, and then as IEEE President, he worked to meet the professional and technical needs of members, such as working with other engineering society presidents on the issue of jobs and job training for unemployed engineers (IEEE)
  • Mumma, Robert - attended the electrical engineering program at Purdue for two years (1922-24), before deciding to leave and become a teacher. He received his teaching certificate from Otterbein College in Ohio, and taught high school in both Florida and Ohio. Mumma returned to work in the electronics field, however, after he received a tutorial from the head of the electrical engineering department at Miami University of Ohio in high frequency AC theory. He got a position at General Motors Radio, where he worked in Joe Desch’s department making test equipment. After that company folded, Mumma worked for police radio in Dayton, Frigidaire, and finally NCR, where he worked under Desch in the Electrical Research Department. He was involved in many projects there, including an electronic counter using gas thyratrons, tube design, standardized magnetic printing on bank checks, and magnetic tape. He sat on a committee that standardized characters. Mumma was also involved in the war effort at NCR, both under the NDRC and later the Navy which put the whole department onto the Ultra project in 1942 (IEEE)
  • Muroga, Saburo - Developed minimum-gate design and the Transduction Method for logic-design automation (IEEE)
  • Murphy, John - 2011 SME President, Executive Director of the McGowan Institute and as a Research Professor in the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh. His academic interests are primarily related to process and workplace health and safety. Prior to joining the University, Professor Murphy served as the Research Director of the Pittsburgh Research Center of the U.S. Bureau of Mines from 1978 until 1997. Under his direction, the Center conducted research pertaining to mine health and safety, as well as other studies that were directed toward new mining technology and mine environmental issues (AIME)
  • Murphy, Robin - Worked on disaster robots, dating from the 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing. Her robots were the first to be used for the emergency response phase of a disaster when the 9/11 World Trade Center attack (IEEE)
  • Murray, Richard - worked in robotics on manipulation and grasping, non-holonomic motion planning, and locomotion at CalTech (IEEE)
  • Musick, Nancy - Special Projects Manager (Technical Activities) for the Society of Petroleum Engineers in Houston, Texas and is responsible for overseeing the SPE Technical Reports and for facilitating the activities of Subject Matter Expert (SME) committees / taskforces focused on dissemination and discussion of technology. She is a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin with BS degree in Petroleum Engineering. Nancy completed more than 18 hours of graduate study in Environmental Engineering at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Currently, she is pursuing a MSE in Project Management from the University of Texas at Austin (SPE)
  • Musmann, Hans - received his Ph.D. in the communications field from the Technical University of Braunschweig. He has worked with tunnel diodes, microwaves, satellite communications, computer and facsimile transmission, and computer-generated images. After obtaining the doctorate, Musmann began focusing on facsimile transmission and source coding, digitizing facsimile images. In the1970s he participated in fax standardization, and also in reducing cost and time factors in fax transmission. Musmann then concentrated on satellite communication of video and audio signals, including the transmission of moving images. In 1972 he founded the Institute for High Frequency Science, which researched innovations in communications technologies, including video transmission techniques for satellites (IEEE)

N

  • Nagle, Troy - 1994 IEEE President and an IEEE Life Fellow, is an academic who started out in digital signal processing at Auburn and later moved into biomedical engineering at North Carolina State. As IEEE President, he confronted a failed upgrade of the Institute’s computer systems and accepted the resignation of IEEE’s Executive Director (IEEE)
  • Nagpal, Radhika - known for her work in biologically inspired multi agent systems, including swarm robotics and bio inspired robot design, decentralized collective algorithms, and global to local abstraction as well as Biological Multi-Agent systems, including models of multicellular morphogenesis and collective insect behavior (IEEE)
  • Nakahara, Tsuneo - A communications engineer and long-time employee at Sumitomo Electric, where he served in several positions including as executive vice president (IEEE)
  • Nakajima, Heitaro - A communications engineer at Sony and NHK who worked on the development of digital audio recording and CD technology (IEEE)
  • Nakajima, Shigeru - Worked with magnetrons for communications and medical applications (IEEE)
  • Nebeker, Frederik - long-time Senior Research Historian at the IEEE History Center at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ, his dissertation research formed the basis of his first book, Calculating the Weather: Meteorology in the 20th Century, which was published in 1995. Other books include From 0 to 1: An Authoritative History of Modern Computing edited,(2002) and Dawn of the Electronic Age: Electrical Technologies in the Shaping of the Modern World, 1914 to 1945 (2009). (IEEE)
  • Nelson, Brad - spent his career in robotics, focusing on control, manipulation, micro-positioning, and micro/nanorobotics, conducting research at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Illinois, Minnesota (IEEE)
  • Nicoud, Jean-Daniel - worked in robotics, moved from academia at Lausanne to form a private company (DIDEL) (IEEE)
  • Nieberding, John "Jack" - Worked in the Westinghouse software development section and was involved in many projects, including NASA Goddard contracts, AWACS and Peace Shield (IEEE)
  • Nilsson, Nils - IEEE Life Fellow, spent the first half of his career at SRI and the second half at Stanford. In both places, much of his work focused on Pattern Recognition and AI (IEEE)
  • Nishi, Kazuhiko - started his own company, ASCII Publishing Corporation in 1977 (now ASCII Corporation) (IEEE)
  • Nishitani, Takao - IEEE Fellow, produced pioneering DSP (digital signal processing) and ADPCM (Adaptive Differential Pulse Code Modulation) technology as an employee at NEC during the 1970s and 1980s. The DSP chip he developed revolutionized microprocessing and the computer industry in the 1980s and 1990s. As professor at Tokyo Metropolitan University, IEEE volunteer, and leader in the Signal Processing Society Tokyo Chapter, Professor Dr. Takao Nishitani has bridged the academy and industry to promote industrial signal processing research (IEEE)
  • Noll, A. Michael - Professor Emeritus of Communication and former Dean at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. Before joining the Annenberg School in 1984, Noll had a varied career in basic research, telecommunication marketing, and science policy. In addition, he is an early pioneer in the use of digital computers in the visual arts. In the early 1970s, Noll spent two years in Washington as a Technical Assistant to the President's Science Advisor at the White House. From 1977 to 1984, he worked in the AT&T Consumer Products and Marketing Department and he spent nearly fifteen years performing basic research at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, New Jersey (1961-1975). (IEEE)
  • Noonan, Shauna - Completions Technology Manager for ConocoPhillips in Houston. She has worked on artificial lift projects and technology development worldwide at ConocoPhillips and previously Chevron for 22 years. She has chaired many industry artificial lift forums and authored / co-authored over 20 papers on the subject of artificial lift. She was the chair of the ISO standard committee for PCPs and is the current chair of the ISO standard for ESPs. She is the 2012 – 2015 Technical Director for Production and Operations on SPE’s International Board of Directors and chair of the SPE Artificial Lift Conference and Exhibition for North America (SPE)
  • Nourbakhsh, Illah - worked in robotics, focusing on artificial intelligence and planning, and was involved with the Book Store Project and the automated highway system project (IEEE)
  • Noyce, Robert N. - After getting his degree from MIT, he started working with Bill Shockley and later established Fairchild with several people from Shockley. He was a physicist at Fairchild when the concept of the integrated circuit was conceived. (IEEE)
  • Nunnally, Herb - Began in the Westinghouse Field Engineering and Services Department and became marketing manager of FE&S and then for the Communications Division. He worked on various projects such as Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO), Communications Technology Satellite and teleconferencing (IEEE)

O

  • O'Connor, Cyril T. - President of the International Mineral Processing Council since 2006, held the Anglo American Platinum Chair in Minerals Processing from 2008-2012, was Vice-President of the International Zeolite Association, is a member of the Executive of the Academy of Engineering of South Africa, and is CEO of the South African Minerals to Metals Research Institute (AIME)
  • Oh, Jun Ho - worked in industrial automation and his research on control and humanoid robots (IEEE)
  • Ohl, Russel S. - A graduate of Pennsylvania State College, Ohl enlisted in the Army during World War I and conducted license service tests for military aircraft radios. After the war, he continued electrical research in batteries and vacuum tubes. He went to work for the AT&T Company and then for its subsidiary Bell Laboratories, building unipotential tubes and a new portable radio receiver. His subsequent projects were in quartz crystal research, high frequency control, interference reduction, and building semiconductors. (IEEE)
  • Okamura, Allison - worked in robotics, focusing on manipulation, planning, and sensory feedback and haptics (IEEE)
  • Okoshi, Takanori - A communications engineer who has worked on projects in optoelectronics and holography, planar circuits, and optical fiber communication (IEEE)
  • Olson, Harry F. - Known for his contributions to musical sound reproduction, he worked in acoustic research at RCA for 40 years (IEEE)
  • Oman, Henry - worked with Allis Chalmers on the propulsion machinery for submarines and Destroyer Escorts during the war, received a Master’s degree at Oregon State University while working at Boeing on the changing of the fusible resistance link point-by-point as it approached melting temperatures, limiters, and did graduate work at Illinois Tech. He was fundamental in establishing the Power Electronics Society, which has been responsible for the power electronics now all over airplanes. This society grew out of Oman’s initiative to form a conference to discuss the creation of an inverter that would make a.c. out of d.c. with solid-state parts. He also played a role in forming the Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference. Oman also worked on B-52 bombers and atomic-powered airplane, the Rail Garrison Peacekeeper, tested electromagnetic radiation emitted from transmission lines, was the secretary of the Engineering Society of Milwaukee and editor of Milwaukee Engineering, wrote for the Advanced Battery Technology magazine, and worked on battery-powered electric bicycles (IEEE)
  • O'Neal, Russell D. - Worked for the MIT Rad Lab test equipment group on X-band radar, oscilloscopes, and microwave corner reflectors (IEEE)
  • O'Neil, Thomas J. - joined Cleveland-Cliffs in November of 1991 as Senior Vice President-Technical with responsibility for Cliffs' research, engineering, and technical support for business development. In November of 1994, he was named Executive Vice President-CCI Operations and Technology with responsibility for Northshore Mining Company in Minnesota and corporate-wide technical and related services. From 2000 until his retirement in 2003, he served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Cleveland-Cliffs Inc and also as President of The Cleveland-Cliffs Iron Company and Cliffs Mining Company (IEEE)
  • O'Neill, Eugene - received his bachelors in engineering in 1940 and his masters of electrical engineering in 1941, both from Columbia University. He then worked at Bell Labs for the rest of his career. During World War II he worked on airborne radar systems. After the war he worked on the L-3 coaxial system until the early 1950s. He then worked on microwave radio systems; transoceanic submarine cables in the mid 1950s the time-assignment speech interpolation terminal system (TASI) in the late 1950s, which increased capacity by using high-speed switching to use a channel only when a person is talking; and the Telstar project, an early communications satellite, in the early 1960s (IEEE)
  • Onural, Levent - Dr. Onural joined IEEE while in Buffalo and created the IEEE Turkey Section in 1989, shortly after returning to Turkey. He served as director of IEEE Region 8, which is comprised of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, from 2001 through 2002. In 2005, he was the first person from outside of North America to be nominated to run for IEEE President, although he did not win the election. Dr. Onural is currently Professor and Dean of Engineering at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey, where he has taught since 1987. (IEEE)
  • Oppenheim, Alan - IEEE Life Fellow, his principal research interests have been in the field of digital signal processing have focused on nonlinear dynamics and chaotic signals; speech, image, and acoustic signal processing; and knowledge-based signal processing (IEEE)
  • Ortega, Vincente - went into telecommunications engineering and got his degree from Madrid in 1967, along with a Masters in Electrical Engineering from Stanford in 1969, conducted research on microwave electronics, particularly integrated circuits for radio receivers and radio transmitters (IEEE)
  • Osborne, Basil - joined the Radio Division of the National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, in 1947, working on the electron content of the ionosphere, setting up an out-station at Singapore in 1948, and publishing papers on subjects including the disintegration of the equatorial F region after sunset. He continued ionospheric research from 1952 to 1954 as a Lecturer in physics at the University of Malaya. In 1954 he joined Ultra Electric, and published papers on color television chrominance circuits; and was later with J. H. Owen Harries in Bermuda, working on color television projection displays. (IEEE)

P

  • Pal, Yash - born in 1926 in Jhang, in modern-day Pakistan. His studies at the Lahore campus at the University of the Punjab were interrupted due to partition, and he earned his MSc degree in physics from the reconstituted Delhi campus of Panjab University in 1949, and later earned a Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Much his career was spent at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, where he was a member of the Cosmic Rays group (IEEE)
  • Palshoj, Jorgen - educated in Copenhagen, Denmark, Jorgen Palshøj accumulated experiences by working with Lego. He started his career at Bang and Olufsen as advertising manager in 1965. In the company, Palshøj took responsibility for international advertising and was involved in product and graphic design. Currently, he is Director of Corporate Identity at Bang and Olufsen, and he coordinates the communication and design in the company (IEEE)
  • Pape, John - served on the staff of the IEEE Communications Society for more than eighteen years, retiring as Director of Marketing and Creative Services. His publications and marketing career included working for Springer Verlag, Methuen Publishing Ltd., S. Karger, and the American Society of Civil Engineers (IEEE)
  • Pappas, George - worked in robotics at RPI and UC Berkeley (IEEE)
  • Parker, Alice C. - IEEE Fellow “for contributions to design automation in the areas of high-level synthesis, hardware descriptive languages, and design representation.” (IEEE)
  • Parker, Lynne - a faculty member at the University of Tennessee, served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy as Assistant Director of Artificial Intelligence (IEEE)
  • Parkinson, Brad - Marconi Fellow and an IEEE Life Fellow, was program manager of what would become the Global Positioning System (IEEE)
  • Parks, Tom - majored in electrical engineering for his bachelors at Cornell, and while there he worked at the Cornell Aeronautical Lab in Buffalo on magnetic amplifiers and designing circuits, developing an early interest in analog signal processing. Parks went to GE in Ithaca to work on telemetry, and later returned to Cornell for his masters and PhD working with Hans Schuessler and Jim Thorpe. After graduation, he was hired at Rice University and while there he began studying digital filters. His interest in number theory transforms came with a stint at the Lincoln Labs under Ben Gold in 1973, while in the 1980s Parks did consulting work for the Schlumberger in Houston where he became acquainted with acoustic well logging and associated signal processing. He returned to Cornell to teach in 1986, where he continued his work from his time at Rice on time frequency analysis, but also work on multi-rate systems (IEEE)
  • Parsons, Sue - SWE Life Fellow, after receiving her bachelor's degree from the University of Minnesota, Sue Parsons began her aerospace career at Douglas Aircraft and later Northrop Grumman. Wanting a more solid understanding of the business, she completed an MBA from California State University, Long Beach. Parsons' career pivoted to contracts management in the early 2000s, and she is currently a contracts director managing defense programs at CGI Federal Inc (SWE)
  • Paté-Cornell, Elisabeth - After completing her degrees, she accepted a faculty position at MIT in the Department of Civil Engineering, where she initiated several research projects on risk analysis and seismic engineering and activity. She later returned to Stanford University in 1981 to be an Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management (IEEM) before becoming Professor in 1991 and the Department Chair in 1997. She also accepted a visiting professor position at Georgia Institute of Technology during her sabbatical year, and one at New York University in the Department of Finance and Risk Analysis. Currently she holds the position of Professor andformer department Chair (from 2000-2011), of the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University. She is also Senior Fellow of the Stanford for International Studies. (IEEE)
  • Patel, Kumar - grew up in India, where he received his B.E. in telecommunications from the College of Engineering in Poona, India in 1958. He then was accepted to Stanford University, where he received his engineering masters degree and Ph.D. in 1959 and 1961, respectively. In 1988 he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the New Jersey Institute of Technology in acknowledgment of his pioneering career. After completing his doctorate degree, Patel joined Bell Laboratories, where he made numerous seminal contributions in many fields, including nonlinear optics, gas lasers, molecular spectroscopy, laser surgery, and pollution detection. His experiments with the carbon dioxide laser led directly to that laser's use in industrial applications, scientific applications developing newer laser technology, medical applications such as gynecological surgery and tumor removal, and remote probing applications such as Doppler radar, pollution gauging, and military uses (IEEE)
  • Paulraj, Arogyaswami - Developed multiple input-multiple output (MIMO) antenna technologies for wireless communications (IEEE)
  • Paxton, Harold W. - TMS Fellow, TMS Past President, U.S. Steel University Professor (Emeritus) of Metallurgy and Materials Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in 1947 and 1948 from the University of Manchester and his Ph.D. in 1952 from the University of Birmingham. In 1953 he became Assistant Professor of Metallurgical Engineering at Carnegie Institute of Technology, subsequently Carnegie Mellon University, and became Head of the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science and Director of the Metals Research Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon in 1966. He was Visiting Professor of Metallurgy and Materials Science at Imperial College, London, in 1962-63 and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1970 and served two years as the first Director, Division of Materials Research, National Science Foundation 1971-1973 (AIME)
  • Payton, Fay Cobb - Professor (with Tenure) of Information Technology/Analytics at North Carolina State University and was named a University Faculty Scholar for her leadership in turning research into solutions to society’s most pressing issues. She is on rotation as a Program Director at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the Division of Computer and Network Systems (IEEE)
  • Peck, Maryly Van Leer - SWE Fellow, first woman to graduate with a degree in chemical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 1951, and the first woman to receive an M.S. and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Florida. She began her career in the aerospace industry as a research engineer, working for the Washington, D.C. Naval Research Laboratory and Rocketdyne Corporation in California. Peck lived on the island of Guam for 11 years, where she became the first woman dean of the College of Business and Applied Technology at the University of Guam and founder and dean of what is now the Community College of Guam. In 1982, she became the first female president of Polk Community College, and later became its President Emeritus (SWE)
  • Peden, Irene - SWE Fellow, IEEE Fellow, joined the faculty of the University of Washington in 1962 and served terms as Associate Dean of the College of Engineering and Associate Chairman of the electrical engineering department in addition to teaching and research, later becoming Professor Emerita of Electrical Engineering. She graduated in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado in 1947 and earned both a M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. In the 1990s, Peden served two years as Director of the Division of Electrical and Communications Systems at the National Science Foundation. Her research interests cover several fields: applied electromagnetics, radio science, antennas and subsurface remote sensing. In 1970, Peden was the first woman engineer or scientist to conduct field research in the Antarctic interior (SWE)
  • Pedersen, Aage - IEEE Fellow, in 1949 Pedersen took a study tour of Holland and England, and won a two-year scholarship to the University of Liverpool, where he studied electrical discharges with high voltage equipment. In 1953 he returned to Denmark and taught at the Technical University. In 1956 Pedersen went to work for the English Electrical Company, which was then England's largest manufacturer of power equipment, and oversaw high voltage transformer testing. Pedersen then accepted a job offer from ASEA, and moved to Sweden to work on rotating high voltage machines and research epoxy insulation of generator windings. In 1961 he returned to the Technical University in Copenhagen to teach applications of physics to power engineering, and continued consulting for ASEA (IEEE)
  • Pedersen, Gunnar - in Denmark, he worked for the Telegraph Administration and built short wave radio transmitter which would connect Denmark and the United States. Pederson became Bureau Chief in the General Directory in 1942. After World War II, he became involved in many international activities, including his participation in the 1947 conference in Atlantic City and the ’48-’49 Mexico City conference. In 1954, Pedersen became the Technical Director for the Post and Telegraph Service of Denmark, which was involved in all the public radio stations. As a radio expert, he ran the technical side for Denmark Radio and took charge of the studio engineering for radio broadcasting. From 1960 to 1975, he served as General Director of the Post and Telegraph Service (IEEE)
  • Pelton, Arthur D. - Professor Emeritus in the Dep’t.of Chemical Engineering and co-director of the Center for Computational Thermochemistry at Polytechnique Montréal in Montreal, Canada. He is a co-founder of the FactSage thermodynamic database computing system (AIME)
  • Peng, Syd S. - Charles E. Lawall Chair of Mining Engineering emeritus, Department of Mining Engineering, West Virginia University (WVU), Morgantown, WV, U.S.A., from 1970 to 1974, he worked for the U.S. Bureau of Mines, Twin Cities Research Center in charge of rock physics research. He joined WVU in 1974. In 1978 he was appointed as chairman of the Mining Engineering Department, a position he held until September 2006. He served again as interim chair in 2015. He retired from WVU in 2013 (AIME)
  • Penzias, Arno - Although his primary work has always been in research and management at Bell Labs, he has held appointments at Princeton, Harvard College Observatory, and Stony Brook. He was hired by Bell in 1961, became a radiophysics department head in 1972, and was named director of the Radio Research Laboratory in 1976. With coworker Robert Wilson, he won the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of the background radiation of the universe. At the time of this interview in 1980, Penzias was Executive Director of Bell Labs (IEEE)
  • Peppas, Nicholas - A chemical and biomedical engineer who has taught at Purdue University and the University of Texas at Austin and is a leading researcher in biomaterials and delivery (IEEE)
  • Perry, Vincent - vice president-geology of The Anaconda Company. He has been with the company for more than 45 years during which time he has been responsible for the development of many important mines and geological techniques. Under his leadership, Anaconda has projected its capability to produce copper at the rate of one million tons per year in the early 1970's, a 50% increase over five years. Anaconda's growth has also included further development in such basic metals as uranium, molybdenum, beryllium and others (AIME)
  • Petritz, Richard - In 1949, he worked briefly with his advisor Arnold Segert at Los Alamos. In 1950, he became a professor of engineering at Catholic University in Washington, DC. He left CUA in 1958 to become a research director at Texas Instruments in Dallas. After ten years at TI, he left and formed a venture capital group called New Business Resources that focused on businesses in the semiconductor industry. NBR founded Mostek, among others; Petritz served as first president of Mostek. After NBR disbanded, Petritz went on to form NMOS, jointly owned by the British government and the private sector. After Thorn-EMI bought out Britain's share, he helped form Simtek, which specializes in high-end memory chips (IEEE)
  • Pfeifer, Rolf - worked in artificial intelligence, locomotion, cognitive robots and AI and bio-robotics (IEEE)
  • Phillips, Carolyn - SWE Fellow, SWE 1974-76 president, her first position was with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, working for two years as a reactor engineer on the Safety Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power. In 1962, Phillips became the only woman engineer in the Division of Industrial Hygiene of the New York State Department of Labor, during which time she also earned her Master's in civil engineering from New York University. She was a student at NYU's Institute for Environmental Medicine and School of Engineering in the 1970s, working toward a Ph.D. While there, Phillips served as Assistant Research Scientist at the Institute, conducting various studies and working on health and environmental projects. She then moved on to a long career at Shell Oil Company as an Industrial Hygienist, retiring in a management position (SWE)
  • Pickholtz, Raymond - worked at RCA on color TV receiver design (1954-57); worked at ITT Laboratories on spread spectrum radio systems for aerospace applications (1957-61); returned to graduate school at Brooklyn Polytechnic (1961-66); taught at Brooklyn Polytechnic (1966-72); consulted at IBM starting ca. 1967-68; taught at George Washington University (1972-). His research has been in data networking; modems; satellite communications; spread spectrum; spread spectrum multiple access/code division multiple access; fading channels; scattering; frequency hopping; and developments in digital radio (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) (IEEE)
  • Pierce, John (Part 1) - Made many important contributions to microwave and communications technology, including in microwave electron tubes and communications satellites (IEEE)
  • Pierce, John (Part 2) (IEEE)
  • Pierce, John (Part 3) (IEEE)
  • Plante, Kenneth - Worked as a Westinghouse engineering manager and then chief engineer for the Electronic Warfare Division. Projects he worked on include B70, ULCER, Pod programs, RWRs and ALQ-165 (IEEE)
  • Plunkett, Elizabeth - SWE Fellow, successful engineer in the aviation and astronautical fields. She attended the University of Washington and began working for the Boeing Company her sophomore year. Plunkett stayed with the company her entire 37-year career, beginning as a draftsman and working her way up to Engineering Technical Laboratory Manager, where she oversaw two laboratories that provided experimental test facilities for all commercial airplanes. For several years she worked as a research analyst and test director for aeroelastic models of hypersonic orbital and space flight systems during the very beginning of the U.S. space program (SWE)
  • Pollard, Ernest - Worked in the MIT Rad Lab indicator's group and on the Steering Committee and was able to convince the Navy that navigational microwave radar was possible (IEEE)
  • Poloujadoff, Michel - French electrical engineer who was instrumental in the establishment of electrical engineering programs in France, Tunisia and Egypt. He spent a one-year fellowship at Harvard where he worked on the Aiken computer, returned to France to complete his doctorate. After serving in the French Air Force he commenced a lengthy teaching career at the University of Grenoble (IEEE)
  • Poston, Steve - professor emeritus at Texas A&M University with over 45 years’ experience in the petroleum industry. His vast career includes reservoir engineering and decline curve analysis, teaching, and consulting in the US, Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and Russia, member of SPE and has served on numerous committees including the committee on rewriting the seven-volume Petroleum Engineering Handbook. He co-authored many technical papers and presented over 41 at various university and technical meetings. He is also co-author of Overpressured Gas Reservoirs with Robert R. Berg and Analysis of Production Decline Curves with Bobby D. Poe Jr. (SPE)
  • Pound, Robert - A MIT Rad Lab section chief of microwave mixers and converters in the RF group who developed broadband stub support for coaxial transmission lines (IEEE)
  • Pourcelot, Léandre George - began his professional career in 1963 as a researcher at INSA, Lyon, where he developed the first European ultrasonic Doppler velocimeter. In 1968, he joined the Faculty of Medicine in Tours, France, where he was assistant, associate, and then full Professor. He also was director of the Group of Public interest GIP “Ultrasound” and of the INSERM research Unit 316, co-founded several industrial companies, as well as the French Society for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (1972) www.sfaumb.fr, the French Doppler Club (1975) and more recently (2004) the Planiol Foundation (IEEE)
  • Poveromo, Joseph J. - received his Ph.D. in 1974 at the Center for Process Metallurgy, State U. of New York/Buffalo after receiving a BS Chem. Eng. from Rensselaer Poly in 1968. In 1968-69 he worked for Sinclair Oil as a process engineer in Harvey, Illinois. After receiving his Ph.D. he then joined Bethlehem Steel’s Homer Research Laboratories where he worked from 1974 through early 1993; advancing to the position of Research Consultant. In 1993 he established his consultancy, Raw Materials & Ironmaking Global Consulting. From 1993 through 2008 his principal client was the Quebec Cartier Mining Company, for whom he served as Director Technology-International. Currently, he consults for steel, iron ore, other natural resource, technology provider, financial and consultancy companies on a global basis (AIME)
  • Preece, Betty - SWE Fellow, upon graduation she worked as an engineer for General Electric and then as a project engineer/section chief of surveillance systems for the Air Force Missile Test Center at Cape Canaveral during the early years of the aerospace program. She went on to serve as editor of the Indian River Engineer for the Institute of Radio Engineers in the early 1960s, and thereafter worked in academia upon earning an M.S. in Science Education. Preece served as a high school physics teacher and adjunct faculty at the Florida Institute of Technology for over 20 years. (SWE)
  • Pritchard, Margaret - SWE Life Fellow, served SWE in numerous capacities, including as national archives committee chair, and most recently, on the national level as Region J director during FY02-03. She was involved in the planning and execution of the first International Conference of Women Engineers and Scientists, which SWE hosted in 1964 in New York, and enthusiastically attended subsequent ICWES meetings across the globe. Now retired, for many years she was an international consultant with her own firm, specializing in the areas of wastewater treatment, pollution control, and energy conservation. She was instrumental in establishing SWE’s “Over the Hill” tradition at the annual conference, and rarely missed a gathering (SWE)
  • Proakis, John - IEEE Life Fellow, is emeritus and Research Professor at Northeastern University and his research is in the areas of digital communications and digital signal processing (IEEE)
  • Proebster, Walter - educated in at the Technical University in Munich. After completing his Ph.D., Proebster went to work for the IBM Research Laboratory in Zurich. From 1962 to 1964 he was director at the research laboratory in Yorktown as Director of Experimental Machines. He then became head and later director of the IBM Development Laboratories of Germany in Böblingen. At the time of the interview, Proebster was Extraordinaius Professor at the Technical University in Munich teaching computer science (IEEE)
  • Pugh, Emerson W. - 1989 IEEE President, and worked for IBM for twenty-five years in the following positions: research scientist, product development manager, and corporate executive (IEEE)
  • Purcell, Edward - Worked on MIT Rad Lab RF and systems research and on a counter-mortar radar and was head of the Fundamental Developments group (IEEE)

R

  • Rabiner, Lawrence - "co-op" at Bell Labs at Whippany and Murray Hill, N.J. between 1962 and 1964, where he worked on digital circuitry, military communications, and the study of binaural hearing. He subsequently became a regular staff member of the Laboratories. His Ph.D. thesis and some of his early work at Bell Laboratories was in the field of speech synthesis and since 1967 he has worked on digital filter design, spectrum analysis, implementation of digital systems, random number generators, and other aspects of signal processing. (IEEE)
  • Rader, Charles - IEEE Fellow, accepted a position at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory in 1961, where he has been since that time. He began his early forays in electrical engineering through his early interest in artificial intelligence and speech processing. Overall, his research has focused on speech bandwidth compression digital signal processing, and space-based radar systems. One of his major accomplishments was as a leader of the team that helped build the LES-8 and LES-9 communications satellites launched in 1976. (IEEE)
  • Rajchman, Jan - Did extensive work on computer memory and was involved in Project Lightning. He was also the director of RCA's computer research laboratory. (IEEE)
  • Rambo, William - An electrical engineer who served as a director of Stanford Electronics Laboratories and as Associate Dean of Engineering. (IEEE)
  • Ramo, Simon - In 1936, he took a job at General Electric in Schenectady, NY to work in the new field of microwaves, first in the engineering lab and then in the GE research lab. While at GE he taught a series of courses on electricity and magnetism theory. Out of these lectures came his textbook, Fields and Waves, now in its fifth edition. During the war, he worked on radar. After the war, he moved to Hughes Aircraft where he worked on guided missile systems. (IEEE)
  • Ramsay, Edwin Douglas Shearman (IEEE)
  • Ramsey, Norman F. (1991) - worked on magnetrons under Rabi at the MIT Rad Lab and on developing hardware suitable for X-band or 3 cm radar in the advanced development group. (IEEE)
  • Ramsey, Norman F. (1995) (IEEE)
  • Ranade, Madhu G. - General Manager of Raw Materials Supply & Strategy for Steel Dynamics, beginning January 2021. Madhu was responsible for running the mini-mill in Columbus, Mississippi as its VP & GM from 2013 through 2020. Prior to joining Columbus, Madhu was with ArcelorMittal and its predecessor companies for over 30 years. He started his career at Inland Steel in East Chicago, Indiana. He progressed through technical, operational, managerial and leadership roles, becoming Vice President of ArcelorMittal S. A. Madhu’s unique distinction is that he successfully ran two major integrated steel plants for ArcelorMittal - Indiana Harbor and Burns Harbor (now with Cliffs), and then the Columbus mini-mill for Steel Dynamics. Madhu has extensive experience in all aspects of the steel business – and in building strong, durable teams for achieving record safety, operational and financial results. Madhu holds a master's degree in Materials Science and Mineral Engineering from the University of California – Berkeley, and a bachelor's degree in Metallurgical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology - Mumbai. (AIME)
  • Rao, C.R. - IEEE Life Fellow, is a mathematician, statistician, and professor emeritus at Pennsylvania State University and Research Professor at the University at Buffalo. He spent more than forty years at the Research and Training School at the Indian Statistical Institute, and he discovered the Cramér–Rao bound and the Rao–Blackwell theorem. (IEEE)
  • Raphael, Bertram - Known for his contributions to artificial intelligence, including inventing the A* Search Algorithm and contributing to the development of Shakey the Robot (IEEE)
  • Ratner, Buddy - Researcher at the University of Washington who focused on topics involving blood compatibility with biomaterials (IEEE)
  • Read, Wally - 1996 IEEE President, Read, a power engineer and former president of the Canadian Electrical Association, was the second of three IEEE Presidents from Canada. In the 1980s, Read was responsible for two of the first three IEEE Milestones recognizing events in his native Newfoundland. As IEEE President, he pursued the dual goals of increasing international membership and achieving greater recognition for IEEE members from industry (IEEE)
  • Rechtin, Eberhardt - systems engineer whose communications and systems architecting skills have been focused on deep space and national security applications throughout his career. While doing his doctoral work, Rechtin worked on ballistic missile and communications technology at JPL and developed an integrated, coded phase lock system in 1957-1958. In 1967 he became director of the Advance Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and significantly changed its funding patterns while redefining its operations and defending its existence during the Vietnam War. After becoming Assistant Secretary of Defense for Telecommunications, Rechtin brought his communications and systems experience to Hewlett-Packard in 1973 and helped manage their development of "smart systems." In 1977 Rechtin became president and CEO of the Aerospace Corporation, where he worked to move Aerospace into the satellite mission business. As president and CEO, Rechtin identified himself as Aerospace's chief architect and strategist and, through his applications of systems architecting, shaped Aerospace's research and funding operations and improved the company's reputation significantly. Finally, in 1987 Rechtin became a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Southern California (IEEE)
  • Rediker, Robert - career was largely at MIT, at its Lincoln Lab and as a regular professor. His research was on circuits, transistor circuits, transistors, gallium-arsenide transistors (he patented the first p-n junction in gallium arsenide), and semiconductor lasers. His research was very important for LEDs, transmitting TV by laser, the technology behind CDs. He retired in 1991, worked for a medical laser company until 2000, doing imaging to detect prostate and breast cancer, and finally retired in 2000. (IEEE)
  • Rehm, Bill - World renowned for his work in well control, Bill Rehm developed well control and pressure measurements from electric logs. He wrote the first manual accepted by the US Minerals Management Service (MMS) on well control for drillers and supervisors and also wrote five manuals on well control for drilling contractors that were accepted by the US Geological Survey. In addition, he taught well control courses for many operators and drilling contractors and conducted the first introductory well control school for the MMS. Contributing to some of the most technologically significant advancements in the industry in recent years, Rehm has worked in the area of high-pressure operations and directional drilling, developed slimhole and slick horizontal drilling tools, and developed math models for the turning radius and performance of the tools. A recognized expert in underbalanced drilling, Rehm developed some of the original plans for underbalanced drilling in the Austin Chalk, and created new drilling motors as well as other mechanical equipment and software. (SPE)
  • Reid, John M. - Known as a pioneer of biomedical ultrasound imaging. He also a Life Fellow of the IEEE and a teacher at Drexel University (IEEE)
  • Reinish, Gloria Brooks - SWE Fellow, first woman to receive an undergraduate degree, a master's degree (both in electrical engineering), and a doctorate (in bioengineering) from Columbia University. She began her career in industry, working for Bell Labs and Sperry Gyroscope. Reinish turned to academia while completing her Ph.D. and began teaching both electrical and biomedical engineering at Fairleigh Dickinson University in 1961, becoming a full professor in 1976. She served as the first woman chairperson of the electrical engineering department and as chair of the bioengineering program for a number of years in the 1970s and 1980s (SWE)
  • Reisman, Sorel - directed the international, higher education consortium, Merlot, and is a professor emeritus of information systems at California State University, Fullerton. He has held management positions at IBM, Toshiba, and EMI. He is an IEEE senior member and served as the vice president in charge of the Computer Society Publications Board. Reisman has served as vice president of the Electronic Products and Services Board and as a member of the Transformation and Planning and Membership Committees (IEEE)
  • Remshardt, Rolf - earned a Diplom-Ingenieur degree and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Technical University in Stuttgart, Germany. He began working as a Development Engineer, designing integrated circuits and semiconductor chips, for IBM Germany in 1967. During his nearly thirty years with the firm, Remshardt held several development and management positions (IEEE)
  • Rench, Carl - Rench, Bob Mumma, and Joe Desch worked with each other in a variety of engineering, research, and management roles in the next several decades. Desch was not much present the first few years: his work on the Bombe project during World War II had led him to a nervous breakdown (both from the innate strains of the work and from the particular hassles of dealing with one Navy Captain Ralph Meader). Desch did not ever again seek out positions with high management responsibility, perhaps to avoid another nervous breakdown. Rench and Desch worked together in NCR’s attempts to design a programmable electronic accounting machine. Desch was influential in trying to steer NCR towards computer research—failing to get them to do their own research in the 1940s, succeeding in getting them to buy Computer Research Corporation (CRC) in the 1950s, and eventually in getting them to realize that CRC technology was not up to snuff, and that they would have to use other companies’ computers for some NCR devices. Desch was influential in NCR strategic decisions until ca. 1960, when Bob Chollar, whom Desch did not much care for, took over. Desch then withdrew from his strategic advisor role, though he continued to act as a mentor and advisor to Rench as he made the transition into management roles. In the 1960s Desch did continuing research, establishing an NCR leadership role in thermal printers (IEEE)
  • Richter, Kurt - IEEE Life Fellow, “for contributions to the theory and application of computational electromagnetics.”, 1991-1992 IEEE Region 8 director, founding chair of IEEE Austria section
  • Riener, Robert - worked in robotics, with a focus on simulation and control, medical applications, and prosthetics (IEEE)
  • Ries, Heidi - Following completion of her M.S., she began teaching at Norfolk State University, where she helped organize school-wide assessment plans, establish the Center for Materials Research, and develop the Graduate science program. Leaving Norfolk State for the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), Ries began her current role as Dean for Research, managing and facilitating faculty work, and establishing new research centers. She served briefly as Interim Dean for the Graduate School of Engineering and Management, earning her the 2013 Air Force Exemplary Civilian Service Award (IEEE)
  • Robertson, Randal - Worked on Luis Alvarez’s bombing systems and later edited a volume of the MIT Rad Lab technical series (IEEE)
  • Robinson, Denis M. - Worked as the British liaison at the MIT Rad Lab (IEEE)
  • Robinson, Enders - From 1952 to 1954, Dr. Robinson was director of the MIT Geophysical Analysis Group and he developed the first digital signal filtering methods to process seismic records used in oil exploration. The available computer, the MIT Whirlwind digital computer, was not powerful enough to make this research work commercially feasible at the time. Professor Norbert Wiener of MIT took an active interest in this work which represented the first successful application of his recently developed theory of prediction and filtering of time series. In 1954, Dr. Robinson received his Ph.D. in geophysics from MIT. He then worked in the oil industry both as a geophysicist and as an economist In 1958, Dr. Robinson joined the mathematics faculty at the University of Wisconsin at Madison where he became acting director of the computer science department. In 1960, the University of Wisconsin granted a fellowship to Dr. Robinson to work in Uppsala, Sweden under Professor Herman Wold and Professor Harold Cramer, earlier developers of time series analysis. Dr. Robinson stayed in Sweden from 1960 to 1964 as Deputy Professor of Statistics at Uppsala University. With the advent of transistorized computers in the 1960s, digital methods became economically feasible for use in oil exploration. In 1965, six geophysicists and Dr. Robinson formed Digicon Inc. which was one of the first companies to process seismic records by computers. From 1970 to 1983, Dr. Robinson divided his time between the oil exploration industry and universities (IEEE)
  • Robinson, Leon - enjoyed a thirty-nine year career at Exxon and made contributions in many technology areas such as: mud cleaners, explosive drilling, drilling data telemetry, subsurface rock mechanics, and drilling and hydraulic optimization techniques, tertiary oil recovery, on-site drilling workshops, world-wide drilling fluid seminars and rig site consultation. He has received thirty-four US patents and twenty-three international patents pertaining to these areas. Currently, he is a consultant, Chairman of the IADC Technical Publications Committee writing the encyclopedia of drilling, Chairman of an API task group involved with API RP 13C, member of API task groups addressing issues with drilling fluids and hydraulics, and on the AADE Conference planning committee (SPE)
  • Rochester, Nathaniel - Worked in the MIT Rad Lab RF components group and was in charge of diodes (IEEE)
  • Rodriguez-Ibabe, Jose M. - Chair of CEIT (Centre for Technical Research) since 2017 and is a senior researcher in the same organisation. He is an industrial engineer holding a Master of Metallurgy and a PhD in Industrial Engineering from the ESII School of Industrial Engineering at the University of Navarre in San Sebastián. His research training began when he conducted his doctoral thesis under the direction of Professor Gil Sevillano. His thesis looked at the mechanical properties of steels (fatigue and brittle fracture) and drew on fracture mechanics, which was a novel approach at the time (AIME)
  • Rohde, Ulrich - attended universities of Munich and Darmstadt, studying electrical engineering and radio communications, and received a PhD in electrical engineering (1978), an Sc.D. (hon., 1979) in radio communications, Dr.-Ing. Degree from the University in Berlin (2004), and Dr.-Ing. habil. degree from the University of Cottbus (2011). He is Chairman of Synergy Microwave Corp., and President of Communications Consulting Corp (IEEE)
  • Rollefson, Ragnar - Worked in MIT Rad Lab R&D on anti-jamming/countermeasures and on what became the Airborne Early Warning and Control System (AEWACS). He later served as the Army Chief Scientist (IEEE)
  • Rollman, Richard - went to Iowa State for his Bachelors in Electrical Engineering and Masters in Spectral Radiometric Response. He worked at the Radiation Laboratory during World War II, the moved to Dumont Laboratories after World War II. There he worked on TV, TV cameras, and the development of quality control for TV mechanical parts and electronics. With Scott Hill and Jerry Steen, he was a leading figure in getting the IRE Group on Reliability formed. He later consulted for the Pentagon, and ended his career working for Bell Labs in the field of transmission engineering. At Bell he also dealt with quality control issues, particularly in the switching system (IEEE)
  • Rosen, Harold - moved the to the California Institute of Technology for graduate school, while he worked part-time for Raytheon, working on anti-aircraft guided missiles and radars. In 1956 Rosen completed his PhD atook a position at Hughes Aircraft. After the Soviets launched Sputnik in 1957 Rosen became involved in the Geosynchronous Communication Satellite Program, a career that lasted from 1959, until his retirement 1993 (IEEE)
  • Rosen, Paul - graduate of Tufts University, was head of the ground equipment satellite group at Lincoln Laboratory. While at the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (AFCRL), which later became Lincoln Laboratory, he worked on the SAGE (Semi Automatic Ground Environment) program. He also designed a modem that depended on amplitude alone, which was adopted by Bell Labs (IEEE)
  • Rosenfeld, Azriel - pioneer in the field of signal processing and Computer Vision as well as a founder in the field of Digital Geometry. A self-described theoretician, Rosenfeld originally specialized in the field of physics before changing emphasis to concentrate on discrete mathematics. At the University of Pittsburgh he was on the committee that initially designed degree programs in computer science and was the first professor in the university to teach courses on pattern recognition, artificial intelligence, and image processing (IEEE)
  • Ross, Ian - President Emeritus of the Bell Laboratories. He joined Bell Labs in 1952 becoming involved in the development of a wide variety of semiconductor devices. In 1959, he became Director of the semiconductor laboratory at Murray Hill, New Jersey, and three years later was named Director of the Semiconductor Device and Electron Tube Laboratory in Allentown, Pennsylvania. In 1964, he was appointed Managing Director of Bellcom, a Bell Systems subsidiary that was formed to provide systemes engineering to NASA's Project Apollo (manned flight to the moon.) He became President of Bellcom in 1968. In 1971 he returned to Bell Labs as Executive Director of the Network Planning Division and was promoted to Bell Labs Vice President in 1973, Executive Vice President in 1976 and President in 1979. He retired in 1992. He was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 1973, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 1982, the Engineering Academy of Japan in 1988 and the Royal Academy of Engineering in 1990. (IEEE)
  • Roth, Bernie - worked in robotics on force control manipulation, and at Stanford University (IEEE)
  • Rowell‎‎, John M. - joined Bell Laboratories in 1961 after carrying out his graduate studies at Oxford University, Oxford, England. With P. W. Anderson, he made the first observation of the Josephson effect and demonstrated the magnetic field sensitivity of the Josephson current. He held the first patent granted for logic applications of the Josephson effect. With W. L. McMillan, he developed tunneling spectroscopy, which determines in detail the electron-phonon interaction that causes superconductivity, at least in the low-Tc materials. In a collaboration with J. Geerk, M. Gurvitch, and M. Washington, he invented the niobium/aluminum Josephson junction process that is now the basis of all low-Tc digital electronics and magnetic sensors. He held a series of management positions at Bell Laboratories and in 1983 he joined Bell Communications Research (Bellcore) as Assistant Vice President of the Solid State Science and Technology Laboratory. He joined Conductus, a start-up superconducting electronics company, in 1989 as Chief Technical Officer (IEEE)
  • Royden, George T. - pioneer in wireless communication, received his degree from Stanford University. While attending Stanford, Royden worked part-time at Federal Telegraph. He took a full-time position with Federal upon graduation. At the end of WWI, he took a position with the Navy at Mare Island (IEEE)
  • Ruoff, Carl - worked in robotics research at Caltech and JPL and was involved in projects such as the Sojourner rover (IEEE)
  • Russell, Reginald - the focus of this interview is Russell's tenure as IEEE Region 8 Director. Russell held the office in 1973 and 1974. He starts by telling how he came to be Director, explaining that he became involved in Region 8 affairs as a representative of the UKRI Section. In the remainder of this interview, he talks about his experiences as Director. Russell concentrated on membership east of the Iron Curtain during his term, and he discusses his efforts to expand IEEE activity in the Communist countries at length. Here he shares memories of his trips to the Soviet Union and Poland in these years. He also speaks about chairing the Region 8 Committee and serving on the IEEE Board of Directors (IEEE)
  • Ryder, John Douglass - Served as the head of the electrical engineering department at the University of Illinois and as the Dean of Michigan State University. He was also the IRE president in 1955 and was the first editor of Spectrum (IEEE)
  • Rypinski, Chandos - Rypinski's early love of amateur radio and experimenting with radio equipment determined the rest of his pathbreaking career. A graduate of Cal Tech, Rypinski contributed a great deal to the U.S. military effort throughout World War II, especially with his work in radar. Rypinski learned and taught others to operate and maintain the 584 anti-aircraft radar, and prepared synchronized plotting boards to calculate enemy flight trajectories. These inventions helped achieve U.S. successes in the Iwo Jima and Okinawa military campaigns (IEEE)

S

  • Saad, Theodore - Began in the MIT Rad Lab theoretical division and switched to the microwave components division (IEEE)
  • Saba, Shoichi - President and chief executive of Toshiba (IEEE)
  • Saby, John - worked at the GE Electronics lab on semiconductors and transistors, and was involved in the effort to make a commercially manufacturable transistor. In 1956 he transferred to the Lamp Research Lab, and worked there until his retirement in 1982, in research and administrative positions (IEEE)
  • Sachs, Murray - Founding Director of the Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Institute whose primary research area is the neural processing of speech (IEEE)
  • Sadoway, Donald R. - After a year of postdoctoral study at MIT as a NATO Fellow, Dr. Sadoway joined the faculty in 1978. The author of over 150 scientific papers and holder of 19 U.S. patents, his research is directed towards the development of rechargeable batteries for grid-level storage and environmentally sound technologies for the extraction of metals (AIME)
  • Salisbury, Ken - worked on robotics projects, such as the Stanford (Salisbury) Hand and Barrett arm (IEEE)
  • Samaniego-Verduzco, Fernando - Emeritus Professor of Petroleum Engineering at the School of Engineering, National University of Mexico (UNAM), 1991 President of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Mexico Section. (AIME)
  • Sammet, Jean - Designer of COBOL, FORMAC, and first woman president of the ACM (IEEE)
  • Sandretto, Peter - graduated from Purdue University in 1930 and worked for Bell Labs in aviation radio from 1930 to 1932. In 1932, he left Bell Labs for a position with United Airlines, where he worked until 1942. He was commissioned into the Air Force in 1942, where he was assigned as assistant chief of the radar division. Near the end of the war, Sandretto was assigned as countermeasures officer to the Seventh Air Force in the Pacific. After the war, he became director of Aviation for International Communications Labs (IEEE)
  • Sasaki, Tadashi - Has led major accomplishments in the miniaturization and power optimization of small electronics, making the commercialization of liquid crystal display (LCD) technology possible (IEEE)
  • Saunders, Robert - 1977 IEEE President, Saunders spent his career at the University of California, first at Berkeley and then at Irvine. First as head of the IEEE Educational Activities Board, and later as IEEE President, he advocated IEEE activities in continuing education. (IEEE)
  • Schaal, Stefan - worked in robotics at MIT and with the ERATO project in Japan (IEEE)
  • Schafer, Ron - one of the first engineers to work with digital signal processing and his theories expanded the concept and applications of the cepstrum beyond the original work done by Tukey and Bogert. Schafer was later recruited by Bell Laboratories where he worked on the application of homomorphic signal processing ideas to the problem of Format Analysis in speech. Schafer's Digital Signal Processing collaboration with Alan Oppenheim was published in 1975 (IEEE)
  • Scharf, Louis - coauthored the books, Statistical Signal Processing: Detection, Estimation, and Time Series Analysis, Addison-Wesley, 1991, Statistical Signal Processing of Complex-Valued Data: The Theory of Improper and Noncircular Signals, Cambridge University Press, 2010. His coauthored book, A First Course in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1990, was republished by Connexions in 2008 (IEEE)
  • Scheinman, Victor - a leader in the research, development, and industrial applications of robotic arms (IEEE)
  • Scherer, Harold - spent his career working in engineering and management positions at several electric utility companies, including Public Service Electric in New Jersey, American Electric, and Commonwealth Electric in Massachusetts (IEEE)
  • Schilling, Donald - Professor of electrical engineering at Brooklyn Poly until 1969, professor at City College of New York, 1970-1992, then worked full-time at his company, SCS, until 1996, when he founded a new company, Golden Bridge Technologies (IEEE)
  • Schips, Kurt - joined Bosch, where his father worked, in 1952. While working on an additional degree in economics, Schips rose through Bosch ranks, starting first as a patent attorney and eventually serving as a senior executive vice president on the management board (IEEE)
  • Schleimann-Jensen, Johan - awarded his first patent in 1926 and received two patents for advances in radio tube design in 1935. An attempt to finance his own tube factory led him first to Sweden and then to America in 1936, where he worked for Sylvania until 1939. He returned to Sweden to start a tube factory for Ericsson in 1939 and continued in that factory until 1948, becoming managing director in 1945. From 1949 to 1959 he headed his own small research lab with a focus on tubes for military applications. In 1959 he went back to work for Sylvania at Mountain View, CA, and remained there until 1964. He then worked on surge arrestors for Svensk Electronar (IEEE)
  • Scholl, Fran - mechanical engineering consultant and project manager at the consulting firm Affiliated Engineers and a member of the Society of Women Engineers. Aubree Osborn is an organizational development manager at Affiliated Engineers (SWE)
  • Schreiber, William F. - went to work for Technicolor corporation where he was contracted to build a television-based simulator that could be used for printing color film. Following his years at Technicolor, he moved to MIT as an associate professor where he remained until he retired. Honored as a Bernard Gordon professor, he attempted to introduce practicality to MIT’s science-based curriculum (IEEE)
  • Schroeder, Manfred - received his Vordiplom in mathematics and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Goettingen in 1951 and 1954, respectively. In 1954 he went to work for Bell Labs, where he researched microwave and acoustic relationships and focused on speech acoustics. Schroeder built speech synthesizers, experimented with bandwidth compression and adaptive predictive coding of speech for telephone communications systems. In 1963 he became Bell Labs' Director of Acoustics and Speech Research, and in 1969 he accepted a full professorship in physics at the University of Goettingen, where he spent half his time and shared the other half with Bell Labs (IEEE)
  • Schuessler, Hans Wilhelm - IEEE Fellow, General Chairman of the first conference on Signal Processing in Germany, organized for the NTG in 1973, the 2nd European Signal Processing Conference (EURASIP) in 1983 and the International Symposium on Signals, Systems, and Electronics (URSI) in 1989, all in Erlangen (IEEE)
  • Schwan, Herman (1992) - Helped build the institutional basis in several organizations for biomedical engineering and was a winner of the IEEE Edison Medal (IEEE)
  • Schwan, Herman (1999) (IEEE)
  • Schwartz, Mischa - professor at Brooklyn Poly from 1953 to 1973 (head of the EE department 1961-66, established a telecommunications group there, and since then has been a professor at Columbia (helping found the Center for Telecommunications Research (CTR) in 1985, and serving as hits director until 1988). His research included coincidence detection and sequential detection through the mid-1960s; then, with the development of SABRE, SAGE, and ARPANet, he switched focus to computer networks, particularly performance analysis and queuing theory. He worked on setting standards for networks with the CCITT, CCIR, ISO, and NRC. He has been involved with the IEEE and its Information Theory Group and Communication Society for much of his career, including stints as president of the Communication Society (IEEE)
  • Schwartz, Richard - aerospace engineer and executive who played a pioneering role in the development of Navstar GPS, the satellite-based navigation system (IEEE)
  • Scott, Alex - served The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) as its Executive Director from 1973 until 2008. He earned his bachelor's degree at the Virginia Military Institute and his master's degree in Personnel and Counseling Psychology at Rutgers University. In 1970 he joined the staff of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) at its New York City headquarters (AIME)
  • Scott, Catherine - Worked as a secretary for Kenneth Bainbridge and later for Glen Giddings in the Directors Office of the MIT Rad Lab (IEEE)
  • Scott, James F. - After six years in the Quantum Electronics Research Department at Bell Labs he was appointed professor of physics at Univ. Colorado (Boulder), where he also served as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research. He was Dean of Science and Professor of Physics for eight years in Australia (UNSW, Sydney, and RMIT, Melbourne), Professor of Ferroics in the Physics Department at Cambridge University, and since 2015 Professor of Chemistry and Physics at Univ. St. Andrews (IEEE)
  • Seaborn, True H. - H. True Seaborn’s tenure as an IEEE Computer Society senior staff member began in the summer of 1973, when he succeeded John Kirkley as editor and publisher of Computer magazine. Seaborn played key roles in launching IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications and IEEE Micro magazines in 1981, followed by IEEE Design & Test of Computers and IEEE Software in 1984, and finally IEEE Expert (now called IEEE Intelligent Systems) in 1986. (IEEE)
  • Sears, Ray - communications engineer best known for his invention of the coding tube and barrier grid storage tube at Bell Labs (IEEE)
  • Seely, Samuel - Worked as a project manager of the SCR-582 at the MIT Rad Lab, as head of a mission to Australia and as the person who prepared the Hansen lectures for print (IEEE)
  • Seifert, Franz - mentored numerous doctoral and habilitation students to become leaders in industry and academia in the field of electronics engineering, especially in the areas of (i) spread spectrum techniques, (ii) surface acoustic wave devices and their applications, and (iii) numerical modeling of fields and waves (IEEE)
  • Semiatin, Lee - Senior Scientist in Materials Processing and Processing Science, and research leader of the Metals Processing Group, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. In this position, he is responsible for formulating and leading the Air Force research and development program in the processing of metals and associated modeling and simulation techniques. He assists other AFRL directorates and Air Force system program offices in solving processing problems for aircraft and space systems (AIME)
  • Seo, Jung Uk - Seo joined the new Agency for Defense Development. After thirteen years with this agency, Seo taught as a professor at Seoul National University professor before accepting a governmental appointment on the digital switching system development project. At the Korean Telecommunications Agency, Seo managed Time Division Exchange and emphasized quality assurance and quality management. In the early 1990s Seo served a two year appointment as a Vice Minister of Science and Technology, followed by a government appointment as president of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (IEEE)
  • Severin, Hans - senior professor and researcher specializing in microwave physics at Ruhr University-Bochum in Germany. A graduate of the University of Goettingen, Severin served on the faculty there from 1943 to 1957, with a brief interruption in 1955-1956, when he accepted a one-year research position at RCA Laboratories in Princeton New Jersey. Severin headed up the microwave department of Philips Research Labs in Hamburg between 1956 and 1965 and served as professor of physics at the University of Hamburg in 1960. Severin left Phillips and Hamburg 1965, when he was appointed to the engineering faculty at Ruhr University-Bochum. He served as director of the university's Institute of High Frequency and Microwave Technique until his retirement in 1985 (IEEE)
  • Shaffer, Trey - Senior Partner with ERM based in Houston, Texas, USA. He is ERM’s Global Upstream Oil & Gas Sector Leader. He helps clients with a broad range of sustainability, environmental and safety challenges. Prior to joining ERM in 2003, Trey was the Director of Downstream Services for Boots & Coots International Well Control (SPE)
  • Shanahan, Betty - electrical engineer and former executive director of the Society of Women Engineers. She received an electrical engineering degree from Michigan State University in 1978. She and her husband were both hired at Data General, where Shanahan was the only woman engineer working on the company’s Eagle minicomputer project. After twenty-four years in development, engineering management, and marketing for the electronics and software industries, she was hired in 2002 as the executive director and CEO for the Society of Women Engineers, of which she has been a member since her freshman. Shanahan retired from SWE at the end of 2013, but returned to alma mater as a consultant for the vice president of administrative services at Michigan State University (SWE)
  • Shanesy, Carol - Shanesy got her start as a researcher for IBM, leaving briefly to work at Rand Corporation on programming projects for the New York City Fire Department. Shanesy returned to IBM as a Systems Engineer in their Public Sector, continuing her municipal programming work for New York City (IEEE)
  • Shannon, Claude E. - pioneer in information theory, Shannon was the recipient of the Alfred Noble Prize of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers for his work in switching theory. He received the Morris Liebmann award of the Institute of Radio Engineers in 1949 for his communication theory work. Yale University awarded him an honorary Master of Science degree in 1954, and in 1955, Dr. Shannon received the Stuart Ballantine medal of the Franklin Institute for work in communication theory. He was the author of approximately thirty-five technical papers, and held several patents. He was co-author, with Warren Weaver, of The Mathematical Theory of Communication, and co-editor, with John McCarthy, of Automata Studies (IEEE)
  • Shapiro, Gustave - IEEE Life Fellow, worked as an electrical wireman, a Test Department troubleshooter at Air King Radio, and then joined the Signal Corps laboratory during World War II. During the war he shifted from being a technician to an engineer, though without a degree. He joined the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) after the war and stayed until he retired in 1977. He was involved with electronic miniaturization programs while at the NBS (IEEE)
  • Sharkey, Noel - Director of the Centre for Connection Science at the University of Sheffield. Sharkey is best known for his appearances on television as an expert on robotics as well as his more than 150 scientific articles and books. He has appeared in more than 300 episodes of BBC's television series Robot Wars, Techno Games, and co presenter of Bright Sparks (IEEE)
  • Sherwin, Chalmers - Worked in the MIT Rad Lab indicators group and then in the circuits section after it split (IEEE)
  • Shima, Masatoshi - An electronics engineer who made important contributions to the development of the microprocessor (IEEE)
  • Shimano, Bruce - worked at the Stanford AI Lab and moved to industry when he joined Unimation and founded Adept Technologies (IEEE)
  • Shinoda, Ken'ichi - An electrical engineer at the Fuji Electrical Company who contributed to the development of manganese and alkaline batteries (IEEE)
  • Shipp, Karen - Shipp turned to computer software in mid career, and after earning a degree from North London Polytechnic, spent most of her career as a software developer at Open University, Milton Keynes (IEEE)
  • Shirai, Yoshiaki - mechanical engineer and university professor, who has worked on hand posture recognition, image processing, and sensors for surgical training (IEEE)
  • Shirley, Dame Stephanie (Steve) - In 1962, Dame Shirley founded Freelance Programmers Ltd., a software company that outsourced its work to women programmers with dependents. Her philanthropic organization, the Shirley Foundation, has supported charities dealing with autism and advanced emerging technological fields. In addition, she is one of the founding members of the British Computer Society (IEEE)
  • Shoemaker, Robert S. - Consulting Metallurgist for the Mining and Metals Division of the Bechtel Corporation, served as a Director of AIME. He has served as Director of the Society of Mining Engineers (SME) of AIME, as Chairman of its Program Committee and as Chairman of the Mineral Processing Division. He is also a past Chairman of the San Francisco Section of AIME (AIME)
  • Showers, Ralph M. - began researching radio interference at the Moore School during WWII. In addition to teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, he was active within IRE, serving as chair of Committee 27 Radio Frequency Interference (IEEE)
  • Shriver, Bruce - IEEE Fellow, 1992 IEEE Computer Society president, held a number of teaching and research positions, beginning at the University of Aarhus in Denmark for two years. He then joined the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (ULL) in 1973 where he served for 11 years before joining IBM’s T. J. Watson Research Center in 1984 (IEEE)
  • Shull, Robert D. - joined the National Bureau of Standards, where he initially set up the rapid solidification facility that led to the discovery of "quasicrystals" in 1980. Shull was also part of the collaboration that prepared the first thin films of a high TC superconductor by the laser ablation process (AIME)
  • Shutt, Elsie - Founded in 1958, Shutt’s company Computations, Inc. pioneered the “cottage industry” of freelance women programmers working from home with dependents. Before starting CompInc., Shutt worked as a programmer on ENIAC and at Honeywell (IEEE)
  • Siciliano, Bruce - worked in robotics, and was involved with RoManSy and with the development of the Handbook of Robotics (IEEE)
  • Siegwart, Roland - worked in robotics at Stanford, EPFL, and ETH (IEEE)
  • Siewiorek, Daniel - IEEE Life Fellow, worked on the design of nine multiprocessor systems, including the Cm* Project, and contributed to the dependability design of over two dozen commercial computing systems (IEEE)
  • Silver, Arnold - best known for his role in the Invention of the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device, better known as the SQUID, while working at the Ford Motors Scientific Lab. He later continued his work at superconducting electronic devices as a scientist and administrator at the Aerospace Corporation and TRW (IEEE)
  • Silver, Douglas B. - An economic geologist from the University of Arizona (UA), Doug began his career in 1980 as an exploration geologist for The Anaconda Minerals Company. There, he was one of the principal discoverers of the Silver Creek molybdenum deposit in Colorado that led to his promotion on Anaconda’s newly-formed acquisition team. Thereafter, he began his twenty-year practice as a technical and economic consultant to the global minerals industry, primarily under the banner Balfour Holdings, but also with Noranda, Bond International Gold, and Pincock Allen & Holt (AIME)
  • Simmons, Reid - from a position a Carnegie-Mellon spent many years working on robotics projects for NASA, and in more recent years has worked extensively on human-robot social interactions (IEEE)
  • Simons, Barbara - Simons started off as a researcher at IBM where her work on clock synchronization won her an IBM Research Division Award. As president of the Association for Computing Machinery she was involved in shaping technology legislation (IEEE)
  • Sims, Michael - worked in space robotics, focusing on artificial intelligence and human-robot interaction (IEEE)
  • Sipress, Jack - involved with the development of digital transmission, particularly the T1-T4M systems. He spent two years working on satellite systems, particularly American Bell International, trying to set up a satellite system for the Shah of Iran. In 1978 he went to work on Bell Labs’ fiber optic system, particularly its installation in submarine cables (IEEE)
  • Skillman, William - Skillman played a leading role in the development of Westinghouse pulse Doppler radar systems (IEEE)
  • Skolnik, Merrill - joined MIT’s Lincoln Lab in 1955, working on radar. At the same time he taught a course on radar at Northeastern University, the basis for his 1962 book The Instruction of Radar Systems and became Superintendent of the Radar Division of the Naval Research Laboratory in 1965 (IEEE)
  • Slater, Kenneth F. - joined the Radar Research & Development Establishment in Malvern, moved from the Army Radar Division to Air Defense, and participated in building the Blue Yeoman system there. In 1962, Slater was promoted to Senior Principal scientific officer and in 1965 he participated in installing an air defense system for Saudi Arabia (IEEE)
  • Slater, Lucy - A mathematician, Slater worked on hypergeometric functions and Roger-Ramujan identities using some of the first computers. She helped develop early computer operation systems, and eventually turned her research to economic theories and computing, creating econometric computer programs in conjunction with the British government (IEEE)
  • Sloan, Martha - 1993 IEEE President and an IEEE Life Fellow, spent her career on the faculty of Michigan Technological University. She was both the first female IEEE President and IEEE Treasurer. As IEEE President, she led the American Association of Engineering Societies Engineers Week (IEEE)
  • Smanko, William - Held Westinghouse management positions in Military Requirements, Marketing for Corporate Market Research, Defense Company, the Systems Development Division and Ground Radars. Projects he worked include AWG10 Pulse Doppler, F15 bid and UKADGE (IEEE)
  • Smith, Chester - worked as an engineer for the Army Signal Corps during WWII. An early member of the EMC Society, he helped to develop national standards for controlling interference effects (IEEE)
  • Smith, George E. - shared the 2009 Nobel Prize for physics with Willard Boyle and Charles K. Kao, his research included the charge-coupled device (CCD), the picture phone (integrating photolithography and silicon arrays), the electron beam machine, X-ray lithography, far UV lithography, and simulations of devices via the Cray computer (IEEE)
  • Smith, George F. - worked at Hughes Aircraft Company in 1952. He first worked in the storage tube department, where he made measurements of the secondary emission properties. He then rose to management positions at the Hughes Research Laboratories—he was in charge first of Exploratory Studies, then of many other departments. Most notably, he managed the department which included Ted Maiman, who had just produced the world’s first laser (IEEE)
  • Smith, Philip H. - took a job with Bell Telephone Laboratories, where his first assignment was in the radio research department at the Deal Beach Radio Station. During his career, Smith's work focused primarily on antenna design, both for broadcasting and radar. He is well known for his creation of the Smith Chart for finding complex impedance (IEEE)
  • Smith, Raymond L. - joined the faculty of the Michigan College of Mining and Technology (now Michigan Technological University) as a professor and head of the Department of Metallurgical Engineering. Under his leadership as chairman, the department quickly rose to national prominence. After six years at Michigan Tech, he became the University's sixth president in 1965, a position he would hold for the next fourteen years (AIME)
  • Snelling, Richard - spent his career at Southern Bell and ended as Executive Vice President for Southern Bell and Bell South (IEEE)
  • Snyder, Allan Whitenack - had a varied career also saw him working at Yale Medical School to work on photoreceptors, anthropological travel in the Pacific, Physiological Labs at Cambridge, his work on What Makes a Champion and a current position at the Institute for Advanced Studies at the Australian National University in Canberra. Snyder has contributed greatly to telecommunications with his work on optical waveguide theory and optical fiber telecommunications, and is a recipient of the Marconi Prize (IEEE)
  • Snyder, Joel - 2001 IEEE President, Snyder had a varied career during which he worked in industry, taught, and ran his own consulting firm. He spent much of his presidential year coping with financial issues (IEEE)
  • Solomon, Alva Matthews - worked as a research engineer and consultant for Rochester Applied Science Associates and Paul Weidlinger Consulting Engineer, during which she carried out fundamental research on the mechanical behavior of materials and wave propagation in solids, extending nuclear weapons' effects on structures. Solomon held a number of offices in the Society of Women Engineers and received the SWE Achievement Award in 1971. She was also a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the New York State Society of Professional Engineers, and served on the board of directors of the Engineers Joint Council from 1964-1965 (SWE)
  • Spangler, Jack - Worked on many important Westinghouse projects such as BOMARC, Typhon, SPADE, Deep Submergence Program, and a meteorological satellite (IEEE)
  • Speer, John - joined the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) faculty after 14 years of research and research management in the steel industry (AIME)
  • Spilker, James - IEEE Life Fellow, in 1963, Ford Aerospace hired Spilker as a director, and he designed and implemented the payload for the world’s first military satellite communications system. In 1973 Spilker co-founded Stanford Telecommunications Inc. and sold it in 1999. Between 2001-05 he was an adjunct professor of engineering at Stanford University. In 2005, he co-founded the Stanford University Center for Position, Navigation and Time, and became the co-founder and executive chairman of AOSense Corporation in 2006 (IEEE)
  • Spitzer, Cary - joined NASA’s Langley Research Center (their oldest research complex) in 1962, working there until his retirement in 1994. At Langley he worked until 1969 on wind tunnel (heat transfer instrumentation); from 1969 to 1978 on surface material experiments for the Viking unmanned mission to Mars; from 1978 to 1985 in an avionics planning office; and from 1985 to 1994 on the Advanced Transport Operating System Office (ATOPS), a research airplane that NASA used to test the Microwave Landing System (MLS), the Global Positioning System (GPS), automatic landing systems, digital date exchange, and runway traction experiments (IEEE)
  • Squire, Jon - Squire spent much of his career at Westinghouse as a software engineer, writing the programs for the embedded computers in radar systems (IEEE)
  • Staehlin, John - Worked in the Westinghouse Antenna Advanced Development section on projects such as AWACS, APQ-72, AWG-10, B-1B, DIVADS, F-22, EAR and GATOR (IEEE)
  • Steele, Earl - worked for General Electric at their Electronics Park (1951-56), working on how to make semiconductor transistors; for Motorola (1956-60), working on germanium transistors, and their jump to silicon integrated circuits; Hughes Aircraft, their Autonetics division of North American Aviation (1960—ca. 1970?), working on their shift from diodes to transistors, lasers, and simulating the effect of radiation on circuits in charge of Minuteman missiles’ guidance and control; and then to the University of Kentucky as a professor in their Electrical Engineering Department, working on hybrid micro-electronic circuits, (IEEE)
  • Steels, Luc - a long-time professor at the University of Brussels, is best known for his work on employing language for human-robot interactions. Among other things, he played a central role in the development of Sony's AIBO robotic dog (IEEE)
  • Stein, Karl Ulrich - worked in memory performance and thin magnetic film, and in the 1960s with integrated circuits. Stein was also involved with using a symmetrical amplifier and symmetrical design of memory array, leading to patents in Germany and the United States. He later moved to working with microelectronics and microcomputers in the early 1970s in the PC market and automotive industry in areas like engine control, dashboard and fuel consumption. Stein also took part in the basic development of Siemens’ components group, was general manager of Heimann, a small Siemens affiliate, Werk für Diskrete Halbleiter of Seimens and Central Lab (IEEE)
  • Stern, Arthur (1993) - 1975 IEEE President, Stern was an engineer and executive with GE, Martin-Marietta, and Magnavox. Before and during his presidential term. Stern played a central role in solving many of the integration problems that persisted after the 1963 merger that created IEEE (IEEE)
  • Stern, Arthur (2009) (IEEE)
  • Stever, H. Guyford - taught radar school for the U.S. armed forces and became the radar liaison officer to London. Later served as the President of Carnegie-Mellon University, Director of the National Science Foundation and as Science Advisor to the President of the United States (IEEE)
  • Stewart, Pat - Stewart began working with computers while at Barclay’s Bank, where she was instrumental in the company’s transition to the decimal system. She spent the bulk of her career at the Computing Service Department at Cambridge University, where she taught computer courses to the faculty (IEEE)
  • Stokes, Irving - entered the civil service in August 1940, working of the Army. At Ft. Monmouth, he worked on radar development, focusing on radar receivers. He helped developed the American version of IFF (Identification Friend or Foe) and PPI (Plan Position Indicator). He collaborated with other radar labs, including the MIT Rad Lab and the Naval Research Lab. After the war, he joined RCA to work on ICBM early warning systems and the FPS 60. In 1959, he moved to Glendale, California to become chief engineer at Space Electronics Corporation. There he worked on survivable communications and cryptocoding techniques (IEEE)
  • Stone, Ellery W. - licensed ship-to-shore operators and transmitted Naval signals from California. His postwar broadcasting experiences eventually led him to become President of the Federal Telegraph Company and then Vice-President of the International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation (IEEE)
  • Stotz, William - worked at Bendix, where he was involved with ground radar and surveillance radar systems for the military. Stotz also worked at IBM with the SAGE Computer system (IEEE)
  • Strauss, Bruce P. - IEEE Fellow, received his ScD (Materials Science), from M.I.T., and an MBA, from the University of Chicago. He has varied experience in materials and devices for large scale applications of superconductivity primarily at the Department of Energy national laboratories and industry (IEEE)
  • Strauss, Simon David - In 1941, he joined the Reconstruction Finance Corp. and subsequently became a Vice President and Director of Metals Reserves Company, the government corporation that handled war-time procurement of some 87 strategic metals and minerals. After the war, Simon Strauss joined ASARCO Incorporated, where he rose to the position of Vice Chairman in 1977 (AIME)
  • Strelbisky, Michael J. - AIST Fellow, his career spans more than 30 years with Tallman Technologies Inc. starting off as Plant Engineer and progressing to his current position as company President (AIME)
  • Stroke, George Wilhelm - became a full professor at the University of Michigan in 1963, and did a great deal to found the field of optics in electrical engineering, and also the field of holography. He was at Michigan till 1967 (working on deconvolution, deblurring images), at SUNY Stony Brook till 1978 (still working on holography, imaging atoms in a crystal, a.k.a. crystallography), and he came to Germany in 1978 to work for MBB, Deutsche Aerospace, consulting. After 1963 he worked as a consultant to Richard Perkin at the Perkin-Elmer Corporation. He is proud of his work campaigning to get a Nobel Prize for Dennis Gabor for his pioneering work in holography (IEEE)
  • Strong, Ralph - Strong spent much of his Westinghouse career working on BOMARC. Later, he worked on several projects including the Gemini Rendezvous Radar and modifications on the radar system of the B-57 bomber (IEEE)
  • Strong, Virginia Powell - Worked on high burn-out crystals and was one of a small number of female technical staff at the MIT Rad Lab (IEEE)
  • Strull, Gene - An administrator at Westinghouse, serving as the head of the Molecular Electronics Division, the general manager of the Advanced Technology Division, and Vice President for Technology (IEEE)
  • Sturley, Kenneth - began his career at Marconi and eventually became principal of the Marconi College engineer training program. He left Marconi after World War II to set up an engineer training program at the BBC. In 1963 he left the BBC's training program and became the BBC's Chief Engineer at World Service, which involved considerable international work including a professorship at Ahmadu Bello University in Nigeria in 1968 (IEEE)
  • Sugano, Shigeki - spent his career at Waseda University in Japan, where much of his work has concentrated on realizing the Japanese concept of "kokuro," mind, ffection, emotion and intelligence combined, in humanoid robots (IEEE)
  • Sugano, Takuo - his research has included germanium bipolar transistors, electron transport through the surface inversion layer (the channel of the MOS transistor), silicon dioxide films, silicon oxidization, etc. He has co-edited a book, Competitive Edge: Semiconductor Industry in the US and Japan, intended to keep commercial competition from turning into national rivalry. He spent most his career as a professor at the University of Tokyo, and since his mandatory requirement at age 60 has split his time between Toyo University and the government-sponsored Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (IEEE)
  • Sugiyama, Takashi - joined Yokogawa Electric Works in 1947 and by 1978 was appointed Executive Vice President. In the late 1970’s Yokogawa began to foray into the medical systems industry under a contract with the American company, GE. By 1982 this contract was declared a formal joint venture between GE and Yokogawa, creating the new Yokogawa Medical Systems (YMS) (IEEE)
  • Suits, Guy - A research physicist and later Vice-President and Director of Research of GE. During WWII, he headed Division 15 in Electronics of the NDRC. (IEEE)
  • Sukhatme, Gaurav - Faculty at University of Southern California, director of Research for the USC Computer Science Department, director of the USC Robotic Embedded Systems Lab, and co-director of the USC Robotics Research Lab (IEEE)
  • Sullivan, Leo - Worked in the MIT Rad Lab fire-control division, focusing on the SCR-584 (XT-1 originally). He also did maintenance and operations training for the device (IEEE)
  • Suran, Jerome - 1979 IEEE President, Suran retired after thirty years at GE, and then became a professor at the University of California, Davis. As IEEE President, he tried to balance the somewhat divergent interests of U.S. and non-U.S. members (IEEE)
  • Svensson, Len - After spending the first part of his career working on radar systems, he played a leading role in the design and production of the lunar TV camera that was used by the Apollo 11 astronauts to send moving images back to Earth (IEEE)

T

  • Taber, Margaret - SWE Life Fellow, began working in academia as an instructor in Electrical-Electronic Engineering at Cuyahoga Community College and went on to become an assistant, associate, and full professor as well as Chairperson of Engineering Technologies at the college. In 1976, Taber received an Ed.D. from Nova Southeastern University and in 1979 she became both an Associate Professor at Purdue University and an Educational Consultant and Writer for the Cleveland Institute of Electronics. She was the only woman faculty member of the University's Department of Electrical Engineering Technology, was made full professor from 1983-2000, and became a Professor Emerita in 2000 (SWE)
  • Tachikawa, Keiji - worked for NTT since 1962, working largely in digital microwave and satellite technology. He is proudest of his methodology of systems design for digital microwave technology, and for his development of three visions for NTT: the Integrated Services Digital Network vision (1979), the VI&P (multimedia) vision (1990), and the MAGIC (mobile multimedia) vision (1999) (IEEE)
  • Tanenbaum, Morris - began work at Bell Laboratories in 1952, in the Chemical Physics Department. He worked on the chemical composition of transistors. Ca. 1954, at William Shockley’s prompting, he began work on silicon crystals as possible transistors. With the invaluable collaboration of the technician Ernie Buehler, he made the world’s first silicon transistor in January 1955 (IEEE)
  • Tape, Gerald F. - Worked on radar information display, relay radar, and synthetic trainers at the MIT Rad lab. He then transferred to the British branch of the Rad Lab, where he worked on integrating radar and bombing systems and on devising a recognition microwave radar system (IEEE)
  • Taylor, Patrick R. - ASM Fellow, registered professional engineer with over 42 years of experience in mineral processing and extractive metallurgy engineering, research, teaching and consulting. He has worked or given invited presentations in Canada, Mexico, Peru, Venezuela, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Colombia, Brazil, India, England, Turkey and Egypt. He is experienced and trained in pyrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, and mineral processing (AIME)
  • Taylor, Russ - IEEE Life Fellow, has spent much of his career developing robots for surgical applications, first at IBM research and then at Johns Hopkins (IEEE)
  • Teal, Gordon K. - recipient of the IEEE Medal of Honor and member of the National Academy of Engineering. Gordon Teal's contribution to solid state electronics, the monocrystals of germanium and silicon that opened up the field to practical use and commercial viability, guarantees him a high place in the history of technology (IEEE)
  • Teare, Benjamin R. Jr. - Electrical Engineer who worked at GE, Yale University, and as the head of the electrical engineering graduate program at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. He was actively involved in AIEE and was crucial to the merger with IRE (IEEE)
  • Teets, Richard - Executive Vice President of Steel Dynamics, Inc. and Chief Operating Officer for all of the company’s steelmaking divisions. He began his career in the late 1970s as a mechanical engineer for J&L Steel, which later became LTV. In the late 1980s, he joined Nucor, where he supervised the construction of the first thin-cast slab steel plant, which was one of the first large-scale mini-mill plants in the United States (AIME)
  • Terman, Lewis - 2008 IEEE President, IEEE Life Fellow, worked for IBM for forty-five years, retiring from the company’s research division in 2006. During his IEEE presidency, he aimed to expand activities in China, and in the humanitarian sector (IEEE)
  • Thomas, Helen - Worked on preparing a history of the MIT Rad Lab. She would later work as Editor of Publications at the MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (IEEE)
  • Thomas, Leonard Sr. - researched interference reduction for the Navy during WWII before joining the Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Center at the Department of Defense. He was the first U.S. representative to the International Special Committee on Radio Interference and is an IEEE Fellow (IEEE)
  • Thome, Richard - spent his career working in both industry and academia. In industry, his projects included the design and fabrication of superconducting and conventional magnetic systems. Later, at MIT he taught both undergraduate and graduate courses on electromagnetic systems design. Then he established a consulting firm, providing advice on research, management, and the business development in superconducting and conventional electromechanical systems for applications and in mechanical and electrical engineering (IEEE)
  • Thompson, Patricia - after a thirty-one-year career at IEEE, Patricia A. Thompson retired as an Administrator for Customer Operations, part of the IEEE Global Meetings, Conferences & Events Department in Technical Activities (IEEE)
  • Thoren, Bertil - spent his career at the Ludvika High Voltage and Short Circuit Laboratory, his work consisted primarily of testing the breaking capacity of circuit breakers and fuses. By 1954 he became the manager of the high-power laboratory, where he stayed until the middle of the sixties, when he moved to the Power Systems Consulting Department at Västerås (IEEE)
  • Thorpe, Chuck - IEEE Life Fellow, worked chiefly at Carnegie-Mellon, is a long time leader in the development of autonomous land vehicles, better known as self-driving cars (IEEE)
  • Tietjen, Jill (2008) - SWE Life Fellow, president and CEO of her consulting firm, Technically Speaking, Inc. and CEO of the National Women's Hall of Fame. Prior to that, she spent more than 20 years as an engineer in industry, and three years as the director of the Women in Engineering Program at the University of Colorado at Denver. She received a B.S. in applied mathematics with a minor in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, and an MBA from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (SWE)
  • Tietjen, Jill (2011) (SWE)
  • Tilbury, Dawn - Faculty at University of Michigan and reliability and interface issues with the US Army Tank Automotive Command (IEEE)
  • Tinney, William - Widely regarded as the father of modern computer solutions for electric power networks, Tinney was elevated to IEEE Fellow in 1976, “for contributions to the application of digital computers to solve large power network problems.” (IEEE)
  • Tirrell, Matthew - His main research has been in polymer surface properties and he has been a Sloan and a Guggenheim Fellow (IEEE)
  • Toland, Daniel - started work with IEEE in 1989 in Field Service, what is now the contact center. In 1991 he began supporting the Regional Activities Board, and later the Life Members Committee, until 1996. From April 1996 to November 1997 he was involved with IEEE Technical Activities before moving back to the Regional Activities. In 1999 he became the primary staff support person for the Life Members Committee, a position he held until 2011 (IEEE)
  • Tomash, Erwin - joined Telemeter Magnetics in 1956, a Los Angeles-based company. Soon he became the company's president and oversaw Telemeter Magnetics' design of core memories for computers. In 1962 he left Telemeter Magnetic, which had been bought by Ampex, and co-founded a new company, Dataproducts Corporation (IEEE)
  • Torras, Carme - Research Professor at Spanish Council of Scientific Research and author of several novels (IEEE)
  • Tortolani, Michelle - SWE Life Fellow, engineering manager at Northrop Grumman Electronics Systems in Maryland. Prior to that, she was vice president of repeater engineering and operations at Sirius XM Radio Inc. and led development and manufacturing of accessories for digital satellite receivers at WorldSpace Corporation. She is a graduate of Boston University, having received bachelor and master degrees in electrical engineering in 1982 and 1987 (SWE)
  • Totten, Charles A. - spent 37 years of service at Bethlehem Steel, promoted to Senior Supervisor in 2002 (AIME)
  • Townes, Charles H. (1992) - 1964 Nobel prize recipient in physics, was a pioneer in the field of laser theory. He received the IEEE Medal of Honor in 1967 "For his significant contributions in the field of quantum electronics which have led to the maser and the laser." (IEEE)
  • Townes, Charles (1991) (IEEE)
  • Treptow, Arno - worked at AEG in connection with the university and got a job offer from AEG in 1958 when he finished his university study. Arno Treptow was engaged in circuit breakers development at AEG's research and development department and also got in contact with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in Genf. After several years' work, he changed over to manufacturing. Moving through rapidly, Treptow joined in 1985 the board of management of the whole company (IEEE)
  • Trivedi, Nikhil C. - 2010 SME president, SME Fellow, served as vice president of research and development and chief technology officer of Pfizer Minerals Inc. and Minerals Technologies Inc. from 1987 to 2001. Additionally, between 1994 and 2001, he established and built up a powerful technical group in Finland to support the company’s European businesses. Following his retirement in 2003 from Minerals Technologies Inc., Nikhil established IDEKIN INTERNATIONAL, a firm specializing in developing technology transfer opportunities and providing optimizations for chemical and mineral processes. (AIME)
  • Tudor, Edward - president of Regency Electronics, formerly I.D.E.A., when it produced the first transistorized radio, TR-1, in 1954. I.D.E.A. had been formed by three engineers who, like Tudor, had worked at RCA; they left to pursue ideas relating to film sound that RCA had rejected (IEEE)

U

  • Uchiyama, Masaru - IEEE Life Fellow, received a Ph.D. in mechanical Engineering from the University of Tokyo in 1977. His research interests include robotics, flow measurement, intelligent systems, automatic control and their application to aerospace engineering. (IEEE)
  • Uenohara, Michiyuki - A communications engineer known for his work in semiconductors at Bell Labs (IEEE)
  • Ungerboeck, Gottfried - Electrical engineer known for his work in communications and as the inventor of Trellis Coded Modulation (IEEE)

V

  • Vadasz, Leslie - After completing his undergraduate degree in engineering physics at McGill University, Vadasz took a job at Transitron. In 1964 he left for Fairchild Semiconductor, where he developed MOS technology and learned about silicon gate. In 1968 he left Fairchild to found Intel with former colleagues Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andrew Grove. There, he pioneered silicon gate MOS technology, which would lead to the creation of the first microprocessor (IEEE)
  • Valentinuzzi, Max - IEEE Life Fellow, set up the Department of Bioengineering at University of Tucumán. His research has included impedance microbiology and the application of deconvolution to physiology (IEEE)
  • Valia, Hardarshan Singh - After teaching for a short period at Case Western Reserve University and Oberlin College, he entered the industrial world in 1979 as a research engineer at Inland Steel Co.’s research and development laboratories in East Chicago, Ind., USA. His initial work began with improving blast furnace performance/operation by finding ways to improve coke strength after reaction (CSR) with CO2, which resulted in the development of a CSR predictive model. The model is successfully used to predict CSR from coal properties and helped increase CSR, resulting in performance and operation improvements at the No. 7 blast furnace. (AIME)
  • Valley, George E. - joined the faculty of MIT as a professor of physics in 1946. His work on the use of digital computers for air defense led to the formation of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, of which Valley was a leader from 1949 to 1957. Valley then served as Chief Scientist of the Air Force, 1957-58. In 1969 he established the Experimental Study Group, a residential community for beginning MIT students which celebrated its fortieth anniversary in 2009 (IEEE)
  • Van Brussel, Hendrik - IEEE Life Fellow, a professor in Mechatronics and Automation at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven who worked on involving cutting dynamics, structural dynamics, computer-integrated manufacture, and micro- and precision engineering (IEEE)
  • Van Domelen, Mary - started her career with Halliburton and has worked in the USA, Europe and Africa. Prior to Continental, she worked for Maersk Oil and Chesapeake in horizontal drilling and completion operations (SPE)
  • Van Duzer, Theodore (1991) - spent his long career at the University of California-Berkeley developing superconducting devices and circuits. He was also the founding editor of the IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity (IEEE)
  • Van Duzer, Theodore (2014) (IEEE)
  • Vanderslice, Thomas - In 1980, Dr. Thomas A. Vanderslice was President and Chief Operating Officer at GTE. (IEEE)
  • Vanier, Jacques - His research work was oriented towards the understanding and the application of quantum electronics phenomena. He has been a consultant for several companies engaged in the development of atomic clocks. Jacques has also been very active on the academic circuit, giving lectures and conferences at numerous Universities, National Institutes and Summer Schools around the world. He has written more than 120 publications and is the author of review articles and books on masers, lasers and atomic clocks (IEEE)
  • Vannucchi, Guido - In 1960 he joined Telettra as a planner until, in 1970, he was appointed director of the Transmission Laboratory. In 1982 he became Vice-Director and in 1984 Director General of the company. From 1990, when Telettra was sold by FIAT to the ALCATEL group, he acted as strategic consultant to various Italian communications companies. He also promoted the Collana Scientifica Telettra, in which numerous important scientific and educational works were published, many of which he edited (IEEE)
  • Veatch, Ralph - president of Software Enterprises Inc., an engineering consulting firm. Dr. Veatch worked in the Research Department of Amoco Production Company for twenty-three years. Retiring in 1993 as supervisor of the Hydraulic Fracturing and Well Completions and Production Operations groups, he has authored or coauthored 25 technical papers and 12 books, and holds several patents. During his career he served on numerous advisory committees for the American Petroleum Institute, Completion Engineering Association, Gas Research Institute, Los Alamos National Laboratory, National Petroleum Council, and U.S. Department Of Energy (SPE)
  • Veloso, Manuela - Carnegie Mellon University faculty member who became the Herbert A. Simon Professor in 2006. Veloso discusses her career in robotics, focusing on her activities at Carnegie Mellon University (IEEE)
  • Veruggio, Gianmarco - Founder of the CNR-IAN Robotlab at Naval Automation Institute in Genoa, the association Scuola di Robotica, whose work is heavily involved in roboethics (IEEE)
  • Vester, Ben - Started in the Westinghouse Air Arm Division, where he working on the BOMARC radar, and later became manager of Electrical Design and then General Manager of Aerospace (IEEE)
  • Vig, John - 2009 IEEE President, IEEE Life Fellow, and Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, was employed at the Electronic Components Laboratory at Fort Monmouth, NJ, USA, and worked as a physicist, electronics engineer and program manager, he performed and led research aimed at developing high-accuracy clocks, sensors and low-noise oscillators. During his presidency, he focused on issues such as open access publications, the value of IEEE volunteers, the question of who membership is for, diversity, the 125th IEEE Anniversary, and IEEE's role in creating and preserving history (IEEE)
  • Villard, Oswald Garrison - Director of the Radio Science Laboratory, technical advisor to the Naval Research Advisory Committee, and contributor to the field of military electronic systems (IEEE)
  • Viterbi, Andrew - IEEE Life Fellow and an Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) member, did theoretical and practical work on digital communications, including the development of the Viterbi algorithm. He co-founded Qualcomm, which developed the OmniTRACS system and the Eudora e-mail program. (IEEE)
  • Vogel, Fred - After WWI, Vogel joined the Westinghouse Company's Electrical Testing Laboratories, where his work in transformer design initially focused on research and development of insulation materials. Vogel was also a professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IEEE)
  • Vogelman, Joseph - became head of the instrument development branch at the Air Force Laboratory at Ethantham, New Jersey. Later, in the early 1950s, he became chief scientist of the General Engineering Laboratory at the Rome Air Development Center in New York. At Rome he also served as head of Electronic Warfare and eventually as Director of Communications. In 1959 he left the Air Force and went into private industry, serving first as vice president of research and development at the Capehart Corporation and then as head of electronics research and development at the Chromalloy American Corporation. In 1973 he resigned from Chromalloy and became an independent consulting engineer, working primarily with the medical profession (IEEE)
  • Vogt, Guilfred Guil - started working full-time at the Bendix Radio Division in 1955. Although the division experienced a series of mergers, sales, and changes in the next decades, Vogt remained there for the duration of his career. He worked on several projects over the years, focusing mainly on military radar systems. (IEEE)
  • Volpe, Richard - Served as lead engineer for the Rocky-7 rover, the manager for the Mars Regional Mobility and Subsurface Access in JPL's Space Exploration Technology Program Office in 2001-2004. Volpe discusses his career in robotics, focusing on his research at CMU and work at JPL (IEEE)
  • Volz, Richard - President of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society from 2006-2007 and associate computing center director at the University of Michigan, where he worked between 1964-1989 (IEEE)

W

  • Wade, Glen - Wade worked at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Stanford (where he receoved his PhD in 1954), GE, Raytheon, Harvard, and Cornell. Wade's career at UC Santa Barbara began in 1966, and he consulted at Zenith from 1954 to 1974. His professional service includes editoriships at the Journal of Quantum Electronics (1963-65), Transactions on Electron Devices (1961-71), and Proceedings (1977-80) (IEEE)
  • Wagner, Charles - spent most of his career at Westinghouse, where he worked on high voltage electric equipment and computers for automation and design applications. Wagner traveled extensively, both as a Westinghouse engineer and a representative of the IEEE and other service organizations (IEEE)
  • Wah, Benjamin - Fellow of the IEEE, ACM and AAAS, made fundamental contributions to nonlinear optimization. He has developed the mathematical foundation and the algorithms for solving large-scale discrete, continuous, and mixed constrained optimization problems whose functions are not necessarily in closed form (IEEE)
  • Waldron, Ken - Stanford University Professor (Research) who discusses his career and contributions in robotics, focusing on his graduate research and his work at Ohio State and Stanford (IEEE)
  • Walker, Hal - led a team that adapted a ruby laser for measuring the distance from the Earth to the Moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Walker, successfully directed a laser beam, from the Lick Observatory in California, at an 18 inch wide reflector mirror that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin had set up on the Moon’s surface (IEEE)
  • Wallmark, J. T. - In 1947-1948, a stipend from the Swedish-American Foundation put Wallmark in residence at the RCA laboratories in Princeton, NJ, where he submitted multiple patents and participated in development of beam tubes for high frequency applications. Wallmark's award-winning work on the electron beam tube was published in his 1953 dissertation (IEEE)
  • Wanakule, Prinda - Wanakule conducted her graduate studies at the University of Texas at Austin, ultimately completing a doctorate in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Supported by a National Science Foundation graduate and postdoctoral research fellowships, she researched disease-responsive polymeric delivery systems for pulmonary pharmaceuticals. In her postdoctoral work, she applied her technical background to another interest of hers, curriculum design to build children's interest in science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. After completing her post-doctoral fellowship in 2013, she joined the staff of the The Tech Museum of Innovation / The Tech Interactive in San Francisco, becoming the Director of Experience Development & Prototyping in 2016 (SWE)
  • Warner, Chris - As an educator, Warner has taught computer science courses at ICL, South Bank, Open University, Kingston University, and Reed Connections (IEEE)
  • Webb, Josephine - SWE Fellow, in 1942 she joined Westinghouse Electric Corporation as a Design Engineer, and in 1946 became Director of Development for the Facsimile Development Laboratory at the Alden Products Company where she designed an eighteen-inch full newspaper size fax machine. Following a brief tenure with Foxboro Instrument Company, Webb co-founded Webb Consulting Company with her husband. She also took a position in 1977 with North Idaho College where she began development of a Computer Center and worked on several government grants for enhancing the campus and its educational programs (SWE)
  • Weber, Ernst (1988) - Weber spent his career at Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, beginning as a visiting professor of Electrical Engineering and ultimately becoming President of what had become the Polytechnic University of New York (1957-1969). A member of both AIEE and IRE, and a past president of IRE, he was chosen by the merger committee to be the first president of IEEE. As the first IEEE President, he was most concerned with creating an integrated system out of the separate systems of the two predecessor organizations (IEEE)
  • Weber, Ernst (1991) (IEEE)
  • Webster, Roger - Webster conducted war-related research at Harvard's Radio Research Laboratory and at Caltech, where his work on an altitude sensor for bomb detonation contributed to the Manhattan Project. After World War II, Webster took employment with the Stancil-Hoffman Corporation, a Hollywood, California, manufacturer of tape recorders. He began working at Texas Instruments (then General Instruments Incorporated) in October 1951. During his first three years with the corporation, Webster worked on aspects of the magnetic airborne detector, a device used by the Navy to detect submarines. His radio technology experience on the Manhattan Project led to Webster's assignment to TI's Regency radio project in 1954 (IEEE)
  • Weimer, Paul K. - Helped produce the Image Orthicon television camera tube and a solid-state camera tube (IEEE)
  • Weinschel, Bruno - 1986 IEEE President, Weinschel spent most of his career as an electrical entrepreneur, owning his own company that specialized in passive microwave components. After selling his company, he became IEEE President. As IEEE President, he saw the beginning of IEEE electronic publishing, with the distribution of abstracts via CD-ROMs (IEEE)
  • Weiss, Herbert - Worked in the MIT Rad Lab receiver group, where he made a lightweight, stable receiver. He also did systems programs work, helped assemble an American version of the British Oboe navigational system and worked on Project Cadillac (IEEE)
  • Weiss, Max - largely credited with shaping the Aerospace Laboratories during their formative years in the early 1960s. He first joined Aerospace in 1961, after spending nearly 10 years at Bell Labs and 2 years at Hughes Aircraft (IEEE)
  • Welkowitz, Walter - Worked extensively in instrumentation and started up a biomedical engineering program within Rutgers University’s Electrical Engineering Department (IEEE)
  • Wheeler, Harold A. (1985) - best known for his Neutrodyne invention and his development of Automatic Volume Control (IEEE)
  • Wheeler, Harold A. (1991) (IEEE)
  • Whinnery, John - From 1937 to 1946 Whinnery worked with the General Electric Company, focusing on waveguide discontinuities, microwave tubes, and radar applications. In 1952 Whinnery began directing Berkeley's Electronics Research Laboratory, and four years later he became the Chairman of the EE department. From 1959 to 1963 he was Dean of the College of Engineering at Berkeley (IEEE)
  • White, Edwin Lee - joined the Naval Aircraft Radio Laboratory. Leaving NRL, White spent three years as an administrative radio engineer with the Signal Corps. He then joined the Federal Radio Commission as a senior engineer, remaining with the FRC, and its successor, the FCC, until his retirement as chief of the Safety and Special Radio Services Bureau in 1955 (IEEE)
  • White, Marvin - worked Westinghouse, where he conducted research into electron beam scanning, solid state imaging, complementary MOS (CMOS) transistors, and MNOS transistors, which can be used as Nonvolatile Semiconductor Memory, and which eventually evolved into sonos, semiconductor flash memory and storage memory, and smart cards (IEEE)
  • White, Richard M. - IEEE Fellow, worked as a research scientist in the microwave division at GE labs in Palo Alto, CA, where he rediscovered the the photoacoustic effect (originally discovered by Alexander Graham Bell in 1880), before returning to academia in the 1960s in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Department at the University of California at Berkeley (IEEE)
  • White, Stanley A. - worked on R&D of inertial navigation systems, components and devices at Autonetics, the electronics division of North American Aviation. In 1961 he returned to Purdue on educational leave and taught full time for 2 years. In 1963 he was selected as a North American Aviation Science-Engineering Fellow and completed his Ph.D. in electrical engineering in 1965. Back at NAA, White worked on aircraft, missile and spacecraft guidance, navigation, flight-control and communications systems and a variety of other projects, remaining with the company after its merger with Rockwell (IEEE)
  • Whitney, Eugene - IEEE Fellow, Westinghouse's Manager of Waterwheel Generator and Synchronous Condensor Engineering for twenty-three years. His design projects include the Grand Coulee Dam and Niagara Falls hydrogenerators. He retired from Westinghouse in 1975 and began independent consulting as well as consulting for Westinghouse on a part-time basis (IEEE)
  • Whitney, Telle - Whitney got her start in Silicon Valley designing computer chips and software. After holding senior management positions at Actel, Malleable Technologies, and PMC Sierra, she joined the Anita Borg Institute for Women and Technology where she is currently president (IEEE)
  • Whittaker, Red - spent his career at Carnegie-Mellon, where he has long been a principal in its Robotics Institutes. Among his achievements was the design and a deployment of a robot used in the clean up of the failed Three Mile Island Nuclear Reactor (IEEE)
  • Widrow, Bernard - IEEE Fellow, co-author of two major engineering texts, Adaptive Signal Processing (with S. D. Stearns, 1985), and Adaptive Inverse Control (with E. Walach,1994) (IEEE)
  • Wiener, Jim - served as IEEE's general counsel for over twenty years, until leaving corporate practice in 1987 (IEEE)
  • Wiesner, Jerome - Worked at the MIT Rad Lab to make a transmit-receive switch for X-band and later became project engineer for System Cadillac (IEEE)
  • Wilbur, Silvia - A researcher at University College London, Wilbur was involved in the ARPANET project. After teaching at the University of East London and Queen Mary College, she worked on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, developing video-conferencing technology. She also ran Women Into Computing workshops to introduce girls to computer science (IEEE)
  • Wilcox, Brian - employee of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Wilcox was involved in several robotics projects for planetary exploration, including the Mars Rover Sample Return and nanorover (IEEE)
  • Wilcox, George - In 1950 Wilcox took over the Westinghouse International's Special Projects Operation, and he became the international company's Executive Vice President in 1953. In 1955 he became the president and CEO of Westinghouse's Canadian company. Wilcox was promoted to Executive Vice-President of Westinghouse as a whole in 1963 (IEEE)
  • Willbanks, Emily - Devoting her research to defense projects, Willbanks worked at Pratt and Whitney Aircraft before joining Los Alamos. Her projects included designing weapons systems and maintaining storage systems (IEEE)
  • Willhite, G. Paul - Ross H. Forney Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering at the University of Kansas where he has taught petroleum and chemical engineering courses since joining the faculty in 1969. His research program includes studies on waterflooding, surfactant and polymer flooding, water control using gelled polymer systems and carbon dioxide miscible flooding. He is the Co founder of the Tertiary Oil Recovery Project at KU and served as Co Director from 1974-2009 (SPE)
  • Williams, Jan - SWE Life Fellow, manager at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SWE)
  • Williams, Kimball - spent most of his career at Eaton Corporation where he became the principal engineer, overseeing their EMC Laboratory. His work with IEEE includes serving as president of the EMC Society (IEEE)
  • Williams, Michael - professor of computer science at the University of Calgary, 2007 IEEE Computer Society president (IEEE)
  • Wilson, Alexander M. - retired Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Utah International Inc., has been involved in the mining industry for thirty-nine years. In his various roles as Director, President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, he led the transformation of Utah from a construction company into one of North America's most successful mining concerns (AIME)
  • Winfield, Alan - Associate Dean (Research) and Hewlett-Packard Professor of Electronic Engineering at the University of West England, Bristol (IEEE)
  • Winston, Arthur - 2004 IEEE President, IEEE Life Fellow, had a career spanning both industry and applied education. As IEEE President, he championed IEEE as a global organization (IEEE)
  • Wirsing, Penny - SWE Fellow, initially became a project engineer at Rockwell before transitioning to a career in environmental management at Mobil, ExxonMobil and at Torrance Refining Company LLC, FY19 president of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE)
  • Wolff, Irving - joined RCA in 1924, working in the Technical and Test laboratory of the acoustics department. Here, he was involved in loudspeaker development as well as sound recording work for the film industry. In the early 1930s, he shifted his interests to microwave development and was instrumental in RCA's development of microwave aviation navigational equipment. He retired from RCA in 1959 (IEEE)
  • Wonham, Murray - involved with several control research groups in the United States, including the Control and Information Systems Laboratory at Purdue University, the Research Institute of Advanced Studies (RIAS), Brown University's Department of Applied Mathematics, and NASA's Electronics Research Center. In 1970, he became a faculty member at the University of Toronto in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Systems Control (IEEE)
  • Woodall, Roy - Director of Exploration with Western Mining Corporation Ltd., and is a Director of Western Mining Corporation Holdings Pty. Ltd. He joined the company in 1953 as a geologist, after obtaining his B.Sc. in Geology from the University of Western Australia. On a study leave at the University of California. he completed his M.Sc. in Mining in 1957. He returned to Western Mining in 1962. becoming Chief Geologist in 1967, Exploration Manager in 1968, and assumed his present position in 1978 (AIME)
  • Wouk, Victor - invented a new form of compact high voltage power cords for providing power supply, and founded a company, Beta Electric, to sell them. They were used for test equipment for making TVs. He sold the company to Sorenson and Company in 1956, then went to work for Sorenson as the chief engineer of their power supply section. He then invented the use of thyristers for use in off-line switching regulators—his most significant power conditioning achievement, as they are now used in all electronic equipment (IEEE)
  • Wray, Diane - Wray started programming for the Electricity Board before joining the Civil Service. She worked first for the Social Security Department before joining Securities, and helped enforce technology security standards in both offices (IEEE)

X

  • Xiao, Jing - Faculty at the University of North Carolina Charlotte and former program director of the robotics and human augmentation program at the National Science Foundation (IEEE)

Y

  • Yamamura, Sakae - A Nikola Tesla Medal winner who is known for his work on magnetic field driving of electrical arc, his work on analytical theory of the linear induction motor, his development of spiral vector theory, and his work on numerically controlled machine tools (IEEE)
  • Yamanaka, Takashi - executive with the Yokogawa companies, presents a detailed account of the Yokogawa Electric Corporation’s operational policies (IEEE)
  • Yim, Mark - Founder of Virtual Technologies, Yim also worked at Xerox PARC on modular reconfigurable robots. He is currently the Gabel Family Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering (IEEE)
  • Yoshida, Susumo - An electrical engineer at Sony who made a significant contribution to the development of the Trinitron television display tube (IEEE)
  • Young, David M. Jr. - Known for his work in numerical analysis, he also established the Computation Center at University of Texas and was the founding director of the Center for Numerical Analysis (IEEE)
  • Yuta, Shinichi - worked in several positions at the University of Tsukuba since his entry, including dean of the College of Engineering Systems, the chairman of the Institute of Engineering Mechanics and Systems, vice president for research, international affairs, and industrial incorporation, director of the Industry Relations and Technology Transfer Office (IEEE)

Z

  • Zadeh, Lotfi - Professor Emeritus at UC Berkeley, he is well known for his work on fuzzy sets (IEEE)
  • Zajc, Baldomir - joined the Faculty of Electrical Engineering in Ljubljana as Assistant, was elected Assistant Professor in 1976, Associate Professor in 1981 and Full Professor in Electronics and integrated Cicuit Design in 1985. His personal research has been focused mostly on electronic circuit theory and integrated circuit design. He has published more than 120 papers in national and international journals and conferences, more than 20 research reports for state and industrial projects and international projects such as COST, Copernicus, Tempus, ACTS and he was involved in preparation of the Fifth Framework (IEEE)
  • Zetterberg, Lars - received his licentiate degree in 1954 and a scholarship to the University of Chicago where he worked on statistics, after which he went to Bell Labs for three months. Upon returning to Sweden, Zetterberg went back to FOA and worked on developing army communications on the battlefield, also pursuing his PhD and developing Swedish air force defense in air traffic control. After becoming tired of military work, Zetterberg worked a brief stint at SAAB, was at the University of Southern California for four months working with Irving Reed, and eventually went back to KTH as a professor from 1965 until his still active retirement in 1990 (IEEE)
  • Zimbalatti, Anthony - worked for the Army Signal Corps at Fort Monmouth before joining the private sector. He worked at Sperry and Grumman, and was a founding member of the Radio Frequency Interference Society (IEEE)
  • Ziv, Jacob - IEEE Life Fellow, is best known for developing the Lempel-Ziv algorithm for data compression with his colleague, Abraham Lempel. The Lempel-Ziv Data Compression Algorithm was designated as an IEEE milestone in 2004 (IEEE)
  • Zlatuška, Jiří - In 1994, he became professor of informatics at the Faculty of Science of Masaryk University and in the same year, he founded the Faculty of Informatics at Masaryk University and served as its first dean until 1998. From 1998 till 2004, he served as the rector of the university. While in that position, he introduced comprehensive electronic Information system as an effective backbone of the university (IEEE)
  • Zuse, Konrad - German pioneer in computer development. In 1934, when he was a student at Zuse began constructing mechanical computers and then relay computers. During World War II, Zuse founded a company, the Zuse Engineer Bureau. After the war, he received contracts from Remington Rand in Switzerland to build relay computers, and soon expanded into making computers for European companies and universities (IEEE)
  • Zworykin, Vladimir - A director of electronic research at RCA and an honorary vice president. He was a pioneer of television technology and invented the Iconoscope (IEEE)

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