Milestone name

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See my remarks about use of the term "first" under the citation discussion. Dave

Djkemp20:25, 8 November 2014
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Mike S. Just to reiterate; the use of the word "first" in the title and citation is fraught with risk. See the list of milestones at http://ethw.org/Milestones:List_of_Milestones

Notice the infrequent us of "first"

Djkemp (talk)01:34, 31 January 2016
 
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Mike, it was good to chat with you on the phone today. It is encouraging that you feel that content can be added here to the discussion and within the proposal itself to demonstrate that this was indeed the "first". That newspaper clipping in the proposal does support this. Regards Dave

Djkemp (talk)17:23, 4 May 2016
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Dave: The reference documents confirm that this event was indeed the first time that a real rescue and life save had been accomplished using satellite position location information. I have added the following text to the 'What features set this work apart' section:

This event is considered to be the first operational save using satellite position-locating data. The COSPAS and SARSAT satellites were the first to be equipped with transponders for 121.5MHz, 243MHz which are the ELT frequencies for aviation use. The COSPAS satellite had only been activated for a few days before the event and the system was still officially in its research/checkout phase, The incident in the citation was the first recorded real incident. The supporting documents confirm the event as a 'first'. The first maritime save/rescue occurred one month later involving a capsized yacht in the Atlantic ocean.

Mikestott (talk)17:43, 4 May 2016
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Hello Mike, David Kemp was correct in flagging the very cautious use of the word 'First' in any of the IEEE Milestones, and mainly to do with previous experiences we had had to deal with at the History Committee level. That said, the additional information offered does help define better the real milestone intent. From my perspective ' Space Technology' can be read a number of ways, ie being a HF Radio afficionado, I'd see ionosphere and the ancient use of 500KHz cw and 2182 SSB, and here, Space Technology comes across as 'Artificial Satellites'.. maybe thats a better focussed name to consider ?

Regards,

David Burger, Chair IEEE Milestones sub-committee 2016 Sydney, Australia.

k3hz (talk)05:24, 28 September 2016