Difference between revisions of "Milestone-Proposal:Mercury Spacecraft MA-6"

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{{ProposalEdit|a1=Mercury Spacecraft MA-6|a2a=Boeing Bldg 100, St. louis, MO|a2b=St. Louis Section|a3=February 20, 1962|a4=Mercury Spacecraft MA-6, with Col John Glenn as pilot, was the first United States manned orbital flight Its systems epitomize the field of interest of the IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Systems Society. Its electronics included Navigation and control instruments; auto pilot; rate stabilization and control, manual proportional control system and Fly-By-Wire (FBW)manual-electrical system.|a5=This is the second manned spaceflight.  The first was USSR Yuri Gargarin's spaceflight.  This one is set apart by the electrical and electronic systems invented by the McDonnell engineers, some being members of IRE and then subsequently IEEE.|a6=When the design began, there had not been a manned spaceflight.  The electrical and electronics systems had to be able to operate in a new environment-the vacuum of space, the weightlessness of orbital flight, and the rigors of launch and recovery-and the had to be man-rated|a7=The milestone plaque will be mounted at the entrance of the Boeing Prologue Room at Bldg 100. This will provide public access to view the plaque.Inside the Prologue Room, there is an exact replica of the Mercury Spacecraft MA-6 that Col. John Glenn piloted thru 3 earth orbits. The Mercury Spacecraft were designed, developed, and tested in nearby Bldg 1 at the St. Louis Airport. The Prologue room is open to the public during the summer months.|a8=Yes|a9=There is a visitors parking lot next to Bldg 100 where the public may park and walk to the site of the milestone plaque. Boeing provides periodic patrols of the area.  The Prologue Room (site of Mercury Capsule MA-6 ) is inside the secure area of Bldg 100|a10=Boeing|a11=Yes|a12=The St. Louis Section and the AES Society St. Louis Chapter. St Louis Section Chair is Tyria Riley (314-545-6376).  AESS Past President is Jim Leonard (314-777-1932)|a13name=Tyria Riley|a13section=St. Louis Section|a13position=Section Chair|a13email=tyria.riley@boeing.com|a14name=Jim Leonard|a14ou=AES Society|a14position=Past President|a14email=j.leonard@ieee.org|a15Aname=Jim Leonard|a15Aemail=|a15Aname2=|a15Aemail2=|a15Bname=Bob Becnel|a15Bemail=|a15Bname2=Bob Becnel|a15Bemail2=|a15Cname=Jim Leonard|a15Ctitle=Senior Technical Fellow|a15Corg=Boeing|a15Caddress=PO Box 516, StL MO 63316|a15Cphone=314-777-1932|a15Cemail=j.leonard@ieee.org}}
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{{ProposalEdit|a1=Mercury Spacecraft MA-6|a2a=Boeing Bldg 100, St. louis, MO|a2b=St. Louis Section|a3=February 20, 1962|a4=Mercury Spacecraft MA-6, with Col John Glenn as pilot, was the first United States manned orbital flight. This established the United Statesfoundation for future spaceflight, eventually resulting in the landing on the moon of humans.|a5=This is the second manned spaceflight.  The first was USSR Yuri Gargarin's spaceflight.  This one is set apart by the electrical and electronic systems invented by the McDonnell engineers, some being members of IRE and then subsequently IEEE. Its systems epitomize the field of interest of the IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Systems Society. Its electronics included Navigation and control instruments; auto pilot; rate stabilization and control, manual proportional control system and Fly-By-Wire (FBW)manual-electrical system.|a6=When the design began, there had not been a manned spaceflight.  The electrical and electronics systems had to be able to operate in a new environment-the vacuum of space, the weightlessness of orbital flight, and the rigors of launch and recovery-and the had to be man-rated|a7=The milestone plaque will be mounted at the entrance of the Boeing Prologue Room at Bldg 100. This will provide public access to view the plaque.Inside the Prologue Room, there is an exact replica of the Mercury Spacecraft MA-6 that Col. John Glenn piloted thru 3 earth orbits. The Mercury Spacecraft were designed, developed, and tested in nearby Bldg 1 at the St. Louis Airport. The Prologue room is open to the public during the summer months.|a8=Yes|a9=There is a visitors parking lot next to Bldg 100 where the public may park and walk to the site of the milestone plaque. Boeing provides periodic patrols of the area.  The Prologue Room (site of Mercury Capsule MA-6 ) is inside the secure area of Bldg 100|a10=Boeing|a11=Yes|a12=The St. Louis Section and the AES Society St. Louis Chapter. St Louis Section Chair is Tyria Riley (314-545-6376).  AESS Past President is Jim Leonard (314-777-1932)|a13name=Tyria Riley|a13section=St. Louis Section|a13position=Section Chair|a13email=tyria.riley@boeing.com|a14name=Jim Leonard|a14ou=AES Society|a14position=Past President|a14email=j.leonard@ieee.org|a15Aname=Jim Leonard|a15Aemail=j.leonard@ieee.org|a15Aname2=|a15Aemail2=|a15Bname=Bob Becnel|a15Bemail=bob.becnel@boeing.com|a15Bname2=Henry Brownlee, Jr|a15Bemail2=henry.t.brownlee-jr@boeing.com|a15Cname=Jim Leonard|a15Ctitle=Senior Technical Fellow|a15Corg=Boeing|a15Caddress=PO Box 516, StL MO 63316|a15Cphone=314-777-1932|a15Cemail=j.leonard@ieee.org}}

Revision as of 15:24, 11 November 2009

This Proposal has not been submitted and may only be edited by the original author.