Difference between revisions of "Cooke and Wheatstone's Electric Telegraph"

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<p>'''''This article is a stub. You can help the GHN by expanding it.''''' </p>
 
<p>'''''This article is a stub. You can help the GHN by expanding it.''''' </p>
  
[[Image:Wheatstone.gif|thumb|left|Charles Wheatstone]]
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<p>[[Image:Wheatstone.gif|thumb|left|Charles Wheatstone]] </p>
  
 
<p>London, England. On 12 June 1837 William Fothergill Cooke and [[Charles Wheatstone|Charles Wheatstone]] received a patent on electric telegraphy; this was the first English patent for an electric [[Telegraph|telegraph]]. On 4 September the first message was sent on a line Cooke and Wheatstone built from London (Euston Station) to Camden Town. Also on 4 September S.F.B. Morse demonstrated electric telegraphy over a distance of 1700 feet at New York University. </p>
 
<p>London, England. On 12 June 1837 William Fothergill Cooke and [[Charles Wheatstone|Charles Wheatstone]] received a patent on electric telegraphy; this was the first English patent for an electric [[Telegraph|telegraph]]. On 4 September the first message was sent on a line Cooke and Wheatstone built from London (Euston Station) to Camden Town. Also on 4 September S.F.B. Morse demonstrated electric telegraphy over a distance of 1700 feet at New York University. </p>
  
<p>[[Category:Communications]] [[Category:Telegraphy]]</p>
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<p>[[Image:Cooke and Wheatstone electric telegraph.jpg|thumb|center|A Cooke and Wheatstone electric Telegraph from 1837, now in the London Science Museum.]]</p>
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[[Category:Communications]]
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[[Category:Telegraphy]]

Revision as of 14:05, 11 January 2012

This article is a stub. You can help the GHN by expanding it.

Charles Wheatstone

London, England. On 12 June 1837 William Fothergill Cooke and Charles Wheatstone received a patent on electric telegraphy; this was the first English patent for an electric telegraph. On 4 September the first message was sent on a line Cooke and Wheatstone built from London (Euston Station) to Camden Town. Also on 4 September S.F.B. Morse demonstrated electric telegraphy over a distance of 1700 feet at New York University.

A Cooke and Wheatstone electric Telegraph from 1837, now in the London Science Museum.